Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

130 rear spacing with 126 axle?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

130 rear spacing with 126 axle?

Old 02-07-11, 09:45 AM
  #1  
cosmo23
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
cosmo23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Collins, CO
Posts: 20

Bikes: 1983 Fuji Touring Series IV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
130 rear spacing with 126 axle?

I have been building up a 1983 Fuji Touring Series IV bike, assuming it still had the original 126 rear dropout OLN spacing. I just finished building a set of wheels on Campy high flange hubs with a 126 axle (134 total length).

But when I stuck in on the bike I realized for the first time (doh!) that at some point in the past someone had cold set the frame spacing to 130.

Would love to hear what others suggest as the best option. I could:

1) Use the 126 rear axle in the 130 spacing, as the QR skewer keeps things snug, and stay with the six speed Suntour freewheel I have now. Problem--without the skewer in, the stays spring back to 130 and the axle doesn't want to stay in place on its own.

2) Steal a 130 Campy axle from another hub I have. Then the axle matches the dropout. However, I've heard bad things about running a freewheel hub spaced 130, due to breakage--is that true whether I have a six-speed or eight-speed freewheel on the hub?

Would love to hear your take if you have experience with something similar. Thanks!

Mitchell

Last edited by cosmo23; 02-07-11 at 09:45 AM. Reason: typo
cosmo23 is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 09:52 AM
  #2  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 27,342

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 144 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1944 Post(s)
Liked 729 Times in 460 Posts
I don't think I would just put a 126 into a 130 spaced frame it may cause tracking problems.

could you possibly add a 2mm spacer to each side of your current setup?
__________________
Bianchis '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, '93 Reparto Corse SBX

Others but still loved; '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape SLX Bertoni "Speckled Trout"
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 10:25 AM
  #3  
cosmo23
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
cosmo23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Collins, CO
Posts: 20

Bikes: 1983 Fuji Touring Series IV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
I don't think I would just put a 126 into a 130 spaced frame it may cause tracking problems.

could you possibly add a 2mm spacer to each side of your current setup?
I actually have all the proper spacers and the axle for 130 spacing, taken from another a Campy hub. I could definitely respace the rear wheel for 130. My concern was the potential axle breakage I've read about using a freewheel with 130 spacing; however, if I kept a 6 speed freewheel, would that mean less dish, less unsupported axle and thus less chance of breakage?

Also wanted to know where the issues with 'tracking problems' come in; is that because pulling the dropouts in from 130 to 126 will cause slight variations in how the wheel is centered each time I remove/reinstall it?
cosmo23 is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 02:10 PM
  #4  
rogerstg
Fred-ish
 
rogerstg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 1,800
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cosmo23 View Post
Also wanted to know where the issues with 'tracking problems' come in; is that because pulling the dropouts in from 130 to 126 will cause slight variations in how the wheel is centered each time I remove/reinstall it?
IMO, too slight to notice. People do the opposite all the time - 126 to 130 without realigning the dropouts. It's an even bet that your bike did not have it's dropouts realigned when it was coldset to 130
rogerstg is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 02:31 PM
  #5  
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Posts: 17,415
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 437 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Tracking problems?
Grand Bois is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 02:35 PM
  #6  
Sirrus Rider
Velocommuter Commando
 
Sirrus Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 2,676

Bikes: '88 Specialized Sirrus, '89 Alpine Monitor Pass, two '70 Raligh Twenties, '07 Schwinn Town & Country Trike, '07 Specialized Sirrus Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Liked 19 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by rogerstg View Post
IMO, too slight to notice. People do the opposite all the time - 126 to 130 without realigning the dropouts. It's an even bet that your bike did not have it's dropouts realigned when it was coldset to 130
+1 I just did a 130 spaced Axle into a 126 frame with no issues. Other than being a little snug going in and the chain being awfully close to the chain stay while on the smallest cog I couldn't tell the difference.
Sirrus Rider is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 02:48 PM
  #7  
Lenton58 
Senior Member
 
Lenton58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Sendai, Japan: Tohoku region (Northern Honshu))
Posts: 1,672

Bikes: Vitus 979, Simplon 4-Star (Romani), Woodrup Giro, Gazelle AB, Dawes Atlantis

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 4 Posts
Just what I'd do — my 2 cents: Take it to a good mechanic, or a framemaker. Have it cold set it back to 126 . ANY one who is qualified to do this will align the stays relative to the triangle and use a set of "bells to realign the drop outs. Then the same person will push in your 126 hub wheel assembly and check how it pops in and drops out of the drop outs. Lots of C&V people may be doing this themselves, but I take my bikes to a frame maker — just to check them out before I build on them regardless of whether or not I need any cold setting. Paying him is a lot cheaper then buying the bells, and he knows exactly what he is doing. He is quick and the cost is very reasonable. (Besides my giant bench-vise is still on the other side of the Pacific — dammit).
__________________
Vitus 979, Simplon 4 Star, Gazelle Champion Mondial, Woodrup Giro, Dawes Atlantis

Last edited by Lenton58; 02-07-11 at 02:59 PM.
Lenton58 is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 03:04 PM
  #8  
Bianchigirll 
Bianchi Goddess
 
Bianchigirll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Shady Pines Retirement Fort Wayne, In
Posts: 27,342

Bikes: Too many to list here check my signature.

Mentioned: 144 Post(s)
Tagged: 2 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1944 Post(s)
Liked 729 Times in 460 Posts
Originally Posted by Grand Bois View Post
Tracking problems?
well perhaps that is not quite the correct worl but I thought perhaps just using it like it currently is he may have trouble keep the wheel straight.
__________________
Bianchis '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, '93 Reparto Corse SBX

Others but still loved; '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape SLX Bertoni "Speckled Trout"
Bianchigirll is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 03:16 PM
  #9  
GrayJay
Senior Member
 
GrayJay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: EagleRiver AK
Posts: 1,245
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
If you are content with the current 6-speed FW, I would put all 4mm of extra axel spacing on the non-drive side of the hub and re-dish the wheel. This will help to equilize the spoke tension side-to-side for a stronger rear wheel and will help to slighlty reduce threat of axel breakage on the drive side by carrying more of your weight on the non-drive side. Axel breakage on the non-drive side is not a problem, it will still be a much shorted distance than the axel span on the drive side.
Other than interchangeability with other 126mm wheels, there would be no advantage (and some disadvantage) to cold setting back to 126mm. Might be a good idea to confirm that the previous cold-set to 130mm was done right and the frame is in alignment and the rear dropouts are parallel.
GrayJay is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 03:17 PM
  #10  
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,633

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1051 Post(s)
Liked 463 Times in 335 Posts
Originally Posted by rogerstg View Post
IMO, too slight to notice. People do the opposite all the time - 126 to 130 without realigning the dropouts. It's an even bet that your bike did not have it's dropouts realigned when it was coldset to 130
Ditto ... I've got a couple of bike with 130mm wheels stuck in 126mm dropouts. I wouldn't hesitate to go the other way.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: https://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 03:51 PM
  #11  
SJX426 
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 7,744

Bikes: '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '90 De Rosa Professional, '91 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Mentioned: 55 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 987 Post(s)
Liked 623 Times in 393 Posts
What is the impact with chain line for the different configurations? I would think the worst case is the 4mm on the non-drive side as it would move the chain line 2 mm to the drive side. 2/2 sounds better to me.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 06:11 PM
  #12  
NukeouT
Senior Member
 
NukeouT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 446

Bikes: 1996 LeMond Yellow Jersey, 2013 Soma Saga, 1980 Zebrakenko Wind, 1980 Nishiki Ultimate

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by GrayJay View Post
Other than interchangeability with other 126mm wheels, there would be no advantage (and some disadvantage) to cold setting back to 126mm. Might be a good idea to confirm that the previous cold-set to 130mm was done right and the frame is in alignment and the rear dropouts are parallel.
If you are using a 126 I would coldset back to it because that's what your frame was built for. Plus steel can be cold set back and forth quite a couple times before the process becomes a problem for the frame. Just check that you do the job right, and everything lines up after.

I'm no expert mechanic but that's what I'd do.
NukeouT is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 06:48 PM
  #13  
cosmo23
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
cosmo23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Collins, CO
Posts: 20

Bikes: 1983 Fuji Touring Series IV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by rogerstg View Post
IMO, too slight to notice. People do the opposite all the time - 126 to 130 without realigning the dropouts. It's an even bet that your bike did not have it's dropouts realigned when it was coldset to 130
That's what I was thinking at first, but the more I think about it, the more I think that putting a 126 OLN axle in a 130 drop out would cause significant problems. When you go the opposite way (130 axle in 126 dropouts) the steel is going to stretch equally in both directions; but when you pull it in 4 mm, it's going to be awfully difficult to finesse the QR nuts so that each side pulls the dropout in exactly 2mm.

I also like the idea of going to a 130 axle but keeping the six speed freewheel exactly where it is on a 126 axle, and putting 4mm of spacers on the non-drive side. Correct me if I'm wrong but it seems this approach would

1) not increase the length of unsupported axle and thus the likelihood of breakage, and
2) actually decrease the dish compared to a standard 126 axle with 6-speed freewheel

I'll check the dropout alignment. I should also mention that I've laced my wheels, but not yet tensioned and trued them, so this is the time to make my final decision!
Thanks!

Last edited by cosmo23; 02-07-11 at 06:49 PM. Reason: typo
cosmo23 is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 07:40 PM
  #14  
GrayJay
Senior Member
 
GrayJay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: EagleRiver AK
Posts: 1,245
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by SJX426 View Post
What is the impact with chain line for the different configurations? I would think the worst case is the 4mm on the non-drive side as it would move the chain line 2 mm to the drive side. 2/2 sounds better to me.
A 2mm shift in chainline is absolutly nothing. There are a lot of MTB bikes running around with 135mm spacing that have far more chain angularity and they do fine. I wouldnt worry about the chainline at all unless it was previously shifted over too far.
GrayJay is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 07:44 PM
  #15  
Reynolds 
Passista
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 7,206

Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaña pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 718 Post(s)
Liked 361 Times in 211 Posts
One of my bicycles has a 130 frame with a 126 hub. I put a 4 mm spacer on the left side, re-centered the cones (to get the same free axle lenght at each side) and redished the wheel - never had a problem. It's a cassette hub, though.
Reynolds is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 08:15 PM
  #16  
conspiratemus1
Used to be Conspiratemus
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Hamilton ON Canada
Posts: 1,494
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 285 Post(s)
Liked 236 Times in 157 Posts
The way to go is exactly that: 4 mm of spacers on the left side, then re-centre the rim on the axle. Leave the frame as is. It gives you all the advantages and there is no downside. Axle breakage is not a concern because you are not increasing the unsupported distance from the right-side hub bearing to the dropout (because you are not making the freewheel any "deeper.") Your right-side axle nut needs to be 3 - 3.5 mm clear of the outer face of the smallest cog, no more. This will give enough clearance for the chain without making that unsupported distance any longer than it has to be, and it also minimizes dish.

I've been running 6- and 7- speed freewheels in 130mm rear ends for years now. It works. Your wheels will thank you.
conspiratemus1 is offline  
Old 02-07-11, 09:52 PM
  #17  
cosmo23
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
cosmo23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Collins, CO
Posts: 20

Bikes: 1983 Fuji Touring Series IV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by conspiratemus1 View Post
The way to go is exactly that: 4 mm of spacers on the left side, then re-centre the rim on the axle. Leave the frame as is. It gives you all the advantages and there is no downside. Axle breakage is not a concern because you are not increasing the unsupported distance from the right-side hub bearing to the dropout (because you are not making the freewheel any "deeper.") Your right-side axle nut needs to be 3 - 3.5 mm clear of the outer face of the smallest cog, no more. This will give enough clearance for the chain without making that unsupported distance any longer than it has to be, and it also minimizes dish.

I've been running 6- and 7- speed freewheels in 130mm rear ends for years now. It works. Your wheels will thank you.
Thanks! That was exactly the answer I had arrived at, but it's good to hear it works in practice! I'll swap axles tonight so I can get the wheels finished....
cosmo23 is offline  
Old 02-08-11, 05:50 PM
  #18  
old's'cool 
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,360

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 31 Posts
Originally Posted by cosmo23 View Post
That's what I was thinking at first, but the more I think about it, the more I think that putting a 126 OLN axle in a 130 drop out would cause significant problems. When you go the opposite way (130 axle in 126 dropouts) the steel is going to stretch equally in both directions; but when you pull it in 4 mm, it's going to be awfully difficult to finesse the QR nuts so that each side pulls the dropout in exactly 2mm.
That's an interesting comment. What are the physics you are using to make that distinction between squeezing and expanding the rear triangle?
__________________
Geoff
"There is no Fail without Try" - Yoda Simpson
old's'cool is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 01:10 PM
  #19  
cosmo23
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
cosmo23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Collins, CO
Posts: 20

Bikes: 1983 Fuji Touring Series IV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by old's'cool View Post
That's an interesting comment. What are the physics you are using to make that distinction between squeezing and expanding the rear triangle?
Well, I'm no physicist! It just seems that if you're pressing something larger (130 OLN axle) into something smaller (126 dropout) The metal of the chainstays is likely to 'give' equally on both sides. Bu if you're 'pulling' the 130 dropout in to touch the sides of a 126 OLN axle, doesn't seem like the two sides would necessarily pull together at the same rate, even if you're careful to give each side of the QR skewer an equal, opposite turn as you tighten. Just seems like more opportunity for 'drift' of the rim in relation to the center of the dropout.

By the way, I notice that you're in Ft. Collins, too. Howdy, neighbor!
cosmo23 is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 03:04 PM
  #20  
91MF
i'll probably break it
 
91MF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,669
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
my giant cadex is 130 with a 126
my cdale sr600 is 128 with a 130
i put a 120 in a 126 before too.
no issues.

edit: also the above 'physics' make no sense. the QR is just floating in the hollow axle, when you tighten it, the 'pull' from either side is equal.
91MF is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 03:35 PM
  #21  
canopus 
Senior Member
 
canopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kingwood, TX
Posts: 1,352

Bikes: 1985 Cannondale SR300, 1985 Cannondale ST400, 1984 Trek 760, 1984 Trek 610, 1984 Trek 720, 1981 Trek 710, 1979 Trek 710, Gary Littlejohn Cruiser, BMX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 58 Post(s)
Liked 52 Times in 40 Posts
Split the difference, insert a 2mm washer on the Non drive side and call it a day. Leave the frame alone. You never know when you might get a good deal on a 130mm phil hub allowing you to use that 8 spd freewheel you have laying around.
__________________
1984 Cannondale ST
1985 Cannondale SR300
1980 Gary Littlejohn Cruiser
1984 Trek 760
1981 Trek 710
Pics
canopus is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 05:27 PM
  #22  
cosmo23
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
cosmo23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Ft. Collins, CO
Posts: 20

Bikes: 1983 Fuji Touring Series IV

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by 91MF View Post
my giant cadex is 130 with a 126
my cdale sr600 is 128 with a 130
i put a 120 in a 126 before too.
no issues.

edit: also the above 'physics' make no sense. the QR is just floating in the hollow axle, when you tighten it, the 'pull' from either side is equal.
Well, you're probably right! Like I said, I'm no physicist. I think I will go with a 130 axle, though, and try various spacer combos until it all looks right. Thanks everyone for your insights!
cosmo23 is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 07:02 PM
  #23  
old's'cool 
curmudgineer
 
old's'cool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago SW burbs
Posts: 4,360

Bikes: 2 many 2 fit here

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 238 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 31 Posts
Originally Posted by cosmo23 View Post
By the way, I notice that you're in Ft. Collins, too. Howdy, neighbor!
Howdy to you to!
Actually, I'm in the process of moving to Michigan, and already spending most of my time there. I guess I'll update my location once I've got my bikes in Michigan.
__________________
Geoff
"There is no Fail without Try" - Yoda Simpson
old's'cool is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 07:29 PM
  #24  
Lenton58 
Senior Member
 
Lenton58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Sendai, Japan: Tohoku region (Northern Honshu))
Posts: 1,672

Bikes: Vitus 979, Simplon 4-Star (Romani), Woodrup Giro, Gazelle AB, Dawes Atlantis

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 4 Posts
I have read some comments here about drop-out alignment. And, so here is mine. I will try not to belabor the point:

Rear drop-outs need to be checked for alignment — even if you have not cold-set the stays. You can argue and burn me, but this is instruction from decades past by an old-school, Czech racing mechanic and ex-racer — a much-missed friend. And I've seen this proven in his workshop. Unaltered, seemingly unblemished machines can have misaligned drop-outs. I've seen it on my own bikes in recent years.

So what? What does it mean? Well a lot of folks will say something like nothing to fret about. I say, OK, you are right. And from now on you never need to worry about what hubs you are mounting. Any cheap set will do. And you may as well overlook the $15 toothpaste tube of boutique grease to overhaul your hubs.

It just makes sense to mount the axles in aligned drops to reduce even the slightest lateral stress on the bearings. If not, you may be forcing the skewer, or the axle nut, to pull the shoulder of the drop-out into a parallel conformance with the locknut and washer on the axle. It is fractionally incremental, but those are the tolerances any bearing is subject to. Consult 'Barnett's' manual if you are incredulous . I may be a fumbler, but to me this is basic mechanics.
__________________
Vitus 979, Simplon 4 Star, Gazelle Champion Mondial, Woodrup Giro, Dawes Atlantis

Last edited by Lenton58; 02-09-11 at 07:35 PM.
Lenton58 is offline  
Old 02-09-11, 08:00 PM
  #25  
rogerstg
Fred-ish
 
rogerstg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 1,800
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The term "specious accuracy" comes to mind. IOW, just because you can measure it and adjust it does not mean it had an effect.
rogerstg is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.