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Can I re-anodize my rims?

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Can I re-anodize my rims?

Old 03-04-11, 09:14 PM
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bike sloth
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Can I re-anodize my rims?

Hey all,

I just swiped an '87 Schwinn Super Sport from the swap meet in Dudley, MA. The rims are heat treated Rigida SX100's with what I'm assuming is a black anodized finish, though I don't know if the black color is a byproduct of the heat treating. The braking surface has slightly worn down to bare, shiny aluminum in a few spots, mainly where the spokes connect.

If these rims are anodized in the first place, can I spruce them up with a little spot or full re-anodizing? I'm vaguely familiar with the process, but don't know how it works on something that is already anodized.

I think Rigida rims are pretty rad and I'd like to keep them, but they kind of look a little dumpy with the worn spots. If there's no realistic solution I'll either: 1) deal with it and use them, or 2) get new rims, probably Velo-Orange's PBP rims.


Thanks dudes and dudettes...
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Old 03-05-11, 06:36 AM
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ftwelder
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No, usually not. You would need to know the alloy of aluminum and remove all foreign parts like the eyeletts and pins that hold the rim splice. You can remove the anodizing you have and polish the rims.

Colors in anodizing are from a dye used in the process. All rims are heat treated and the process does discolor metal but not in an attractive way.
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Old 03-05-11, 09:01 AM
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Bummer, though I was sort of expecting it. Oh well. Thanks, man!
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Old 03-05-11, 12:19 PM
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Why not just clean the brake surfaces up with fine sand paper? I am not suggesting sanding away much, just enough to create a uniform appearance. Try to eliminate high spots and keep the inside circumference as uniform as possible. I have even removed the anodized surface on the bead of the rim. You can achieve reasonable results through this process.

When sanding, use a solid block to sand with. Use wet/dry sand paper. Set up a system and move frequently from spot to spot. Do not go crazy. Do not press hard. And, check the results of your efforts, every few strokes. Finish with very fine wet/dry paper.

This does take a little time but the results are usually worth it.

As for anodizing the rims again - why bother? They will just look crappy after a single season anyway.
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Old 03-07-11, 08:17 PM
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I like your ^ idea with the sanding. I think I may try out a light, fine bead blasting as an alternative and then do the block sanding on the brake surface. Get it real even-like all over.

No matter what I want to keep these rims now. I took the tires and rim tape off and they're some really nice, double wall, double eyelet jobs. Way nicer than the VO rims I had been thinking of.
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Old 03-07-11, 09:22 PM
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At some point I would worry about weakening of the flanges from erosion.
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