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-   -   Raleigh Colt non-Brooks saddle choices? (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/726355-raleigh-colt-non-brooks-saddle-choices.html)

LisaG 04-09-11 05:40 AM

Raleigh Colt non-Brooks saddle choices?
 
Hello, all--so I've picked up a pretty little Raleigh Colt for myself, and, being an utter newbie, am slowly going about the business of refurbishing. I've got it cleaned up and I've neutralized the rust that remained (very little--and almost none on the frame--mostly on the fenders and rack). I'm going to replace the tires with schwalbe delta cruisers in cream. I've also found a vintage Raleigh front brake that I'm going to clean up and put on, to help with the not-the-greatest coaster brake (it's not the horrible TWC, but the somewhat less horrible SC3, as this is a 1974.

The saddle is the vinyl Wrights saddle that came with it, with a crease down the middle and a tear on one corner, but I long for a Brooks. However, I don't have the $$ for a Brooks--and the other fixes are putting a strain already on my tiny budget. I'd like a B-66 someday (like those springs), but thought that until my budget improves, I'd buy a cheap vinyl vintage springer saddle on e-bay and recover it in leather. I'd prefer to keep the Wrights as-is in storage, just because it's the original saddle, and if someday I part with the Colt (although now, I can't forsee that), I'd have the original to put back on.

Any thoughts? How will the cheap-saddle-recover thing work, if others have done it? And is there a huge difference in the construction among those old spring saddles? Or is there a less expensive substitute to a Brooks that I might be able to save up for?

Any thoughts would be appreciated. Oh, and here's a pic of my Colt, before it was cleaned up.

http://s1112.photobucket.com/albums/...t=IMG_0785.jpg

ftwelder 04-09-11 05:57 AM

Nice bike, welcome. There are lots of used wrights and brooks saddles all over the place that with a little love can be made attractive and comfortable. Home-based bike sellers/flippers will often trade their brooks for one of those gawdy spenco blob saddles as casual buyers don't like original saddles.

cb400bill 04-09-11 06:05 AM

Looks like a fun bike.

http://i1112.photobucket.com/albums/...y/IMG_0785.jpg

Maybe something like this $25 retro saddle from Nashbar will work for you till you get your Brooks.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_503503_-1___

http://www.nashbar.com/images/nashba...-NCL-ANGLE.jpg

katezila 04-09-11 06:13 AM

I have a really fantastic affordable leatherette saddle made by bell on my Schwinn Collegiate. I've gone 30+ miles on this in one ride and been surprisingly comfortable the whole time.
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4146/...c1ba52156e.jpg
I bought mine last June at a K-Mart I think? I know they sell them at Wal-Mart and they were listed on Sear's website when I was looking to buy one too.

Neat bike! Love those frame locks. Congrats on your first foray into the exciting, frustrating, and addictive world of bicycle repair and restoration. Those cream tires will look beautiful!

clubman 04-09-11 06:20 AM

If your mattress saddle is comfortable (& they often are), ride it while you look for a nice, sprung Brooks, Wrights, Lycetts etc. You won't be devaluing anything by using it.

LisaG 04-09-11 11:24 AM


Originally Posted by ftwelder (Post 12481120)
Nice bike, welcome. There are lots of used wrights and brooks saddles all over the place that with a little love can be made attractive and comfortable. Home-based bike sellers/flippers will often trade their brooks for one of those gawdy spenco blob saddles as casual buyers don't like original saddles.

I actually have a couple Wrights on my watch list on ebay. I find that the Brooks saddles get bid up pretty high, even the beat up ones--I'm thinking that if I go this route, the Wrights are still more affordable as they aren't quite as much in demand (or so it seems).

LisaG 04-09-11 11:27 AM

That saddle from Nashbar looks pretty good--I'm wondering if it rides OK for shorter distances (I'm mostly going to be peddling around town, or a short distance down a lfairly flat local bike trail). It does look nice, though.

LisaG 04-09-11 11:51 AM

[QUOTE=katezila;12481144]I have a really fantastic affordable leatherette saddle made by bell on my Schwinn Collegiate. I've gone 30+ miles on this in one ride and been surprisingly comfortable the whole time.
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4146/...c1ba52156e.jpg
I bought mine last June at a K-Mart I think? I know they sell them at Wal-Mart and they were listed on Sear's website when I was looking to buy one too.


--I did a quick search of Wal-Mart and Amazon, but couldn't find one that looks like yours. I tried Sears--but they don't have images of half of their bike products. Do you recall the model name?

Oh, and your bike is verrry priiiiitty! :love: Although my first choice was a Raleigh Colt, my second choice was a 3-speed Schwinn Breeze or Collegiate. (almost all other Raleighs are too big for me.) Love that old American style too--and those shiny shiny fenders. Also, I see you name your bikes. I'm trying to think of a good name for mine--something solid and English . . . Beatrice? Millie? I'm sure something appropriate will come to me.

LisaG 04-09-11 11:58 AM


Originally Posted by clubman (Post 12481158)
If your mattress saddle is comfortable (& they often are), ride it while you look for a nice, sprung Brooks, Wrights, Lycetts etc. You won't be devaluing anything by using it.


I haven't yet had the opportunity to do a long ride--just hopped on to try it out (don't have the front brake on yet plus weather's been bad) and have been cleaning it up--though I think, for the look of it, a brown saddle actually works better with that olive green. But that is one possible strategy, certainly.

Amesja 04-09-11 02:29 PM

You can often find the vinyl Brooks "Mattress" saddles for next to nothing -sometimes with a complete parts bike attached...

Tears and splits are easily fixed with vinyl cement if you clean the vinyl well with acetone first and use a bit of scrap vinyl on the inside as a bandage. It'll be as strong a new if you get the mating parts clean and let it all dry for 24 hours before sitting on it.

katezila 04-10-11 10:16 AM


Originally Posted by Amesja (Post 12482670)
Tears and splits are easily fixed with vinyl cement if you clean the vinyl well with acetone first and use a bit of scrap vinyl on the inside as a bandage. It'll be as strong a new if you get the mating parts clean and let it all dry for 24 hours before sitting on it.

Wow! I've got a red vinyl chair I need to fix and I will absolutely be trying this. Learn something useful every day here!

Thank you Lisa! Naming bikes is half the fun! I like to ride mine for a bit and let them find their own name. Cricket was originally going to be named Clementine before I started riding her more. :)
The saddle's from the Bell Cruisin line. They made a slight variation at one point where they took off the silver bash trim (it's only painted plastic anyhow) It appears that Sears and K-Mart have them out of stock but I found a lot of listings on ebay! They also made a little matching round saddle bag perfect for stashing a phone, some tools, and any other small incidentals.
It's no Brooks, but it'll get the job done. And once you get that fancy sprung leather you'll have a back up winter and wet weather saddle that still looks good.
http://shop.ebay.com/?_from=R40&_trk...All-Categories

chris902 04-10-11 10:24 AM

The VO sprung saddles are both on special:
The one for townbikes:
http://store.velo-orange.com/index.p...e-model-8.html

Sprung touring saddle:
http://store.velo-orange.com/index.p...g-touring.html

$65 each.

Amesja 04-10-11 10:46 AM

I find that I tend to use boring name for bikes. Bikes just don't have the same personality to me that more complex mechanical self-propelled vehicles. Engines give a vehicle more personality.

Cars, motorcycles, boats get human names while bikes are often given plain names like Mombike, Rootbeerbike, Chrome-dome, Old Creaky, etc.

As for saddles, I'm also converting my Ross Mt. Hood to E3S or Dutch-type seating/bars arrangement and am looking for an upright saddle that is more all-weather than a Brooks and less likely to get stolen. I'm not against the cost of the Brooks as I really like it but wish they made a vegan alternative (I don't care about the veganality aspect other than leather is not as weather-proof) using something synthetic. One of the things I looked at was the Electra sprung saddle. But I fear it is too cushy and not as firm and comfy as the Brooks B66 I have on my Sports.

snarkypup 04-10-11 10:40 PM

Veloria's recent post on Vegan saddles:

http://lovelybike.blogspot.com/2011/...c-saddles.html

When in doubt, check Lovely Bicycle!

Amesja 04-11-11 07:10 AM

It seems like she came to the same conclusion as me: "Now, as far as saddles for upright bicycles go, I am not really sure what to tell you. I have not found a good vegan alternative to a sprung leather saddle, so these are more like "the lesser evil" suggestions."

Too bad there isn't some way to effectively water-proof a Brooks by encapsulating it somehow.

The problem with saddles is that most consumers want some over-stuffed sofa that really doesn't work for real riding :( What I want is a brooks made of some sort of leather-like substance that is weather proof so I don't have to worry about it while at the same time having similar stiffness properties. I've had fantasies of taking some sort of super-stiff kevlar-reinforced auto/truck tire sidewall and cutting it to fit a Brooks frame and riveting it on.


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