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-   -   Let's see some C&V guitars! (https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vintage/729969-lets-see-some-c-v-guitars.html)

RobE30 06-01-11 10:48 AM

Ok, I'm a little late but that is how I do things. From left to right, 1978 Les Paul standard (Christmas gift from my wife), late 80's Epiphone Beatle bass, mid 60's Harmony Rocket that was previously altered so I made it mine by adding a Gretsch Filtertron neck pickup, clear pickguard (homemade), Bigsby tremolo and Grover tuners, Hondo bass from late 70's (POS but it works), late 40's Harmony archtop (on the couch) and a late 90's Strat that I swapped pickups etc on. Missing from the picture is my 2006 Martin D-15 (friends mom works in their advertising department so she got me a great deal)
http://i677.photobucket.com/albums/v...uitar003-1.jpg
http://i677.photobucket.com/albums/v...uitar002-1.jpg

My drums, mishmash of mid 60's Gretsch and Rogers accented w/ vintage Zildjan cymbals. My neighbors hate me:D

BigPolishJimmy 06-01-11 11:24 AM


Originally Posted by bigbossman (Post 12620161)
No music theory at all.

Manual control of my hands - that's proving to be a tough one in regards to hitting the appropriate string/fret combinations. This could be because I'm left handed and trying to play a right hand guitar, or it could just be because I'm inept and have little stubby sausage-like fingers.

Musical judgement? What's that? :) I just want to play some simple blues chords, and maybe a passable Folsom Prison Blues. :D


Just wanted to say that EVERY beginning guitarist feels this way. It's natural. Practice, Practice, Practice.

It is not like riding a bike, more like building a wheel, then building another one with a different lacing pattern, then building yet another one with a different pattern, then tearing down and rebuilding a SA hub, then doing it again and again until you no longer need to look at the instructions or think about what you're doing. Your hands know the parts without you having to look at them. your hands know the tension of the spokes without a tension meter. Not impossible, it just takes time to get good.

bigbossman 06-03-11 09:38 PM


Originally Posted by BigPolishJimmy (Post 12724039)
Just wanted to say that EVERY beginning guitarist feels this way. It's natural. Practice, Practice, Practice.

It is not like riding a bike, more like building a wheel, then building another one with a different lacing pattern, then building yet another one with a different pattern, then tearing down and rebuilding a SA hub, then doing it again and again until you no longer need to look at the instructions or think about what you're doing. Your hands know the parts without you having to look at them. your hands know the tension of the spokes without a tension meter. Not impossible, it just takes time to get good.

True dat. I am having a real hard time commanding the fingers to do the right thing. It's coming along......... slowly. :0

BUT!!!! Lookee what I fished off the local CL for $100 - an early Korean made 1989 Squier that looks like it's never been played. Maybe not a high-zoot collectible guitar, but damn damn damn is it nice to look at. I'm in love with it.

All original, good nut, honey maple neck, one small stress crack, no finger wear on the fret board. And it is RED. I just have to learn how to play this thing.

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t...2/redstrat.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t...redstrat-5.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t...redstrat-4.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t...redstrat-3.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t...redstrat-2.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t...redstrat-1.jpg

http://i162.photobucket.com/albums/t...2/P1000819.jpg

RobbieTunes 06-03-11 10:03 PM

Nice. Friend of mine played gigs at Opryland on a Montgomery Wards clone of a strat for years.
We have never figured out how he got the buzz out, but he used to fix TV's, too, so we figured it was something about the frequency, Kenneth.

ColonelJLloyd 06-03-11 10:05 PM

http://www.microwaves101.com/encyclo.../danrather.gif

auchencrow 06-03-11 10:36 PM

Disregarding the frequency Kenneth - I have not shied away from cheap clones. (My main Tele is actually a Mexicaster with a Warmouth neck, Jerry Donahue P/U's)

http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/h...rmouthneck.jpg

20grit 06-03-11 11:52 PM

I used to run one of the Valley Arts Custom Shop Samick Strat clones. It has a nice swamp ash body. The tone is decent. At times, there's nothing wrong with the cheaper end of things. In the end, it turned out to not be my tone. Then again, strats just aren't my tone in general. I have a nice US made strat with texas specials in it... and i barely use it. I built up a guitar body that came from a gibson plant worker with my own take on some gibson circuitry, it is absolutely my tone. Everything else just can't quite match it. Then about year after I built my guitar, Gibson started offering my pick up combination. So next time you see a Gibson with a Burstbucker 3, a 57 classic and orange drop caps.... you'll know I did it first haha.

Back to the strat clone, I've really been threatening a set of danelectro pick ups in the thing. there's nothing quite like a dano tone. It's one I really enjoy.

BigPolishJimmy 06-04-11 04:25 AM

Nice Score! I think I said this before, but I really like the sound and playability of my Squire Korean Telecaster--aslo scored inexpensively--the only drawback is the paintjob--not all that bad--and the tuning machines which are workable but not as nice as the ones on my Gibson, still the tone is great, a completely different realm of sound than the double humbuckers of the explorer.

RobE30 06-04-11 06:45 AM

The tuners on my Mexi Strat were lousy and the pickups were very thin. This was remedied by a SRV neck pickup and GFS 64 gray bottom pickups in the mid and bridge positions. Sperzel locking tuners (got them for cost from my friends music shop) took care of any tuning issues.

Does anyone have their Strats set up so that the tremolo can bend up pitch and down? I spent a few hours trying to get mine set up like that and got frustrated....

Chilidawg 06-04-11 07:35 AM

bigbossman,

"Folsom Prison Blues" sounds really good with the Em Am B7th chord progression, also in dropped-D tuning. It's a favorite of mine.

ColonelJLloyd 06-04-11 07:44 AM


Originally Posted by 20grit (Post 12737980)
Back to the strat clone, I've really been threatening a set of danelectro pick ups in the thing. there's nothing quite like a dano tone. It's one I really enjoy.

I've wanted a Jerry Jones guitar for some time. Never cared for Stratocasters; just not my bag.

eschlwc 06-04-11 02:47 PM

'99ish gold prs mccarty
 
'99ish prs mccarty
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/83/23...2d267907_m.jpg

and '99ish martin j1
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/98/23...a8cc8eb5_m.jpg

rhm 06-04-11 05:22 PM

There's instructions on the internet somewhere, for how to shield the electronics in a Strat. Makes them sound much better. Less hum, buzz, and random interference.

20grit 06-05-11 07:06 AM


Originally Posted by rhm (Post 12740090)
There's instructions on the internet somewhere, for how to shield the electronics in a Strat. Makes them sound much better. Less hum, buzz, and random interference.

I've seen instructions on shielding others. You basically just line everything with copper tape.

rhm 06-05-11 12:49 PM

^Right, but there's a little more to it than that. The shield has to be attached to the ground, or something like that. I found these instructions on the web, printed them while at work, and read them on the train. It all sounded very simple, but then I got to the part where you have to figure out which wire does such-and-such, cut that and attach one end of it to... uh... this is where I nodded off.

BrazAd 06-05-11 02:00 PM

And now a shot from the "sinister side" - the lefties!

http://inlinethumb45.webshots.com/23...600x600Q85.jpg

L-R: '07 Leo Posch cuban mahogany/adirondack, '87 Martin HD-28 BSE, '06 Leo Posch brazilian/adirondack

But I only have one bike... :p

Gary
Owner, LeftyFrets.net

glenmaki 07-21-11 08:16 AM

I happen to have a few guitars. Here is most of them, acquired a couple more and have no pics yet. Questions welcome.
Enjoy, Glen

Plywood strat totally modded by me, 1982 Kramer Stagemaster Special Bass, 1975 Travis Bean Bass
[IMG]http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/f...g/IMG_6158.jpg[/IMG]

Late 70s Peavey 27, Peavey T60
[IMG]http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/f...g/IMG_6596.jpg[/IMG]


Most of them, LOL
[IMG]http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/f...g/IMG_6593.jpg[/IMG]


1967 Watkins Rapier Made in England
[IMG]http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/f...r/IMG_4675.jpg[/IMG]

robatsu 07-21-11 08:40 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Ok, how about a 1965 Gibson L5C with a Dearmond 1100 Rhythm Chief floating pickup. This was one of the ones built the old school way as full acoustic, tops are thinner than the L5CES, they thicken(ed) up the electric ones for feedback issues. Talk about divine....

I'm probably going to be selling this as well soon...

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=211469http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=211470http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=211471

ColonelJLloyd 07-21-11 08:47 AM

Whoa! Nice Axe, Robatsu!

And, Glen, I've always thought the T60s were really cool American guitars. Brian Henneman used to use them a great deal.

P_M 07-21-11 09:08 AM


Originally Posted by ColonelJLloyd (Post 12552632)
If you want to snag a husband buy the guy guitars.

That's one of the greatest quotes I've ever read.

For C&V guitars, I used to have a 1966 Fender Electric XII. Foolishly, I traded it off for a boatload of gear about 12 years ago, but what an amazing guitar. Sunburst, tortoise pickguard, dot inlays and all original with the exception of the strings. It was the first thing I bought in 1992 when I graduated from Computer Engineering.

robatsu 07-21-11 09:32 AM


Originally Posted by BigPolishJimmy (Post 12724039)
Just wanted to say that EVERY beginning guitarist feels this way. It's natural. Practice, Practice, Practice.

It is not like riding a bike, more like building a wheel, then building another one with a different lacing pattern, then building yet another one with a different pattern, then tearing down and rebuilding a SA hub, then doing it again and again until you no longer need to look at the instructions or think about what you're doing. Your hands know the parts without you having to look at them. your hands know the tension of the spokes without a tension meter. Not impossible, it just takes time to get good.

Yeah, you get novices in forums asking things (and this is no slam on novices, stick with me):

Should I:

Learn to read music or learn to play by ear

Spend more time on harmony or solo

Get a good guitar or a cheap one

Play by myself or play out in jams

And so forth, you get the picture...

The answer to all the questions is Yes.

Play, play, play. Most non-musicians way underestimate the time it takes to gain minimum proficiency. By minimum proficiency, I mean where the motions on the guitar have become somewhat internalized and the guitar is your voice, sort of in the same manner that you don't think about tongue/larynx detail control when you talk (but kids have to work at it...).

It reallly is like learning a language. You start of memorizing phrases, learn more phrases, start to play around with them, etc.

Stuff I've had students do is first learn a major scale, plenty of ways to do this. Probably better to do it w/out open strings because the difference in timbre between open/closed strings can be confusing to the ear.

Make sure you really got a grip on that major scale, the intervals between notes.

Then start picking out tunes that are *super* familiar and don't have accidentals, you know, Mary had a little lamb, Twinkle Twinkle little star, Jingle Bells, etc. Some guys groan, but I just say, well, do you really think you're going to be able to whip out a wonderfully expressive solo off the cuff if you can't absolutely murder "Happy Birthday" anywhere on the neck, any key? If you can't, the guitar has not yet become your voice and your still following procedures with your fingers.

Not that there is anything the matter with that, plenty of beautiful music is made at that stage. But where it really gets fun for the musician is when you stop thinking about technique and it is all about the music and the groove. At least it is to me.

But it has to be tunes that you've been hearing all your life and are simple, again, nursery rhyme tunes/Christmas Carols are the easiest for nearly all people, they really know when they hit a clam as opposed to a pop tune that they have the general gist but a little foggy on the finer points.

rhm 07-21-11 09:57 AM

^yup.

When you learn something totally new --something totally new to your brain-- your brain has to go through a certain amount of reprogramming. Learning guitar chords is partly a manual thing that your fingers may object to. But after you've spent some time memorizing the fingerings and forcing the fingers to cooperate for a while, something starts to click. You'll find yourself lying in bed at night and dreaming those chords; hearing music in your head and finding your hand forming the chords mentally. Once that starts happening --and it is an amazing thing, as anyone who has experienced it will tell you-- your fingers will stop objecting to what your brain tells them to do. That's not to say it'll become easy for them; that's a physical thing that some of us never get.

MLKATO 07-21-11 10:02 AM

It's bad enough that I drool over some of your bikes,but now I'm drooling over guitars! I had to sell my vintage items years ago,guitars include '72 Fender Jazz bass,82 Gibson Victory bass,'78 Fender Stratocaster hardtail,'87 Kramer Baretta. I have several guitars now,but none considered vintage. I do have several discontued models,like a Takamine EGS-340sc and a Yamaha Apex 5-NA and a Epiphone Pr-350.

glenmaki 07-21-11 10:33 AM


Originally Posted by ColonelJLloyd (Post 12962677)
Whoa! Nice Axe, Robatsu!

And, Glen, I've always thought the T60s were really cool American guitars. Brian Henneman used to use them a great deal.

The T60s are a very nice and underrated guitar although quite heavy. They put out a wide variety of tones, built like tanks and have good quality parts. I have 2 T60s now, the other is natural. Thanks for the link also!
Glen

jimmuller 07-21-11 11:25 AM


Originally Posted by robatsu (Post 12962986)
The answer to all the questions is Yes.

+100


Originally Posted by robatsu (Post 12962986)
Most non-musicians way underestimate the time it takes to gain minimum proficiency.

Lotta' musicians make that mistake too. They often think they are better than they are. The problem of course is they don't know what areas they are deficient in because they don't understand those areas in the first place.

The more you can tighten your sense of rhythm, tempo, pitch, tone, and artistic judgment, the better. It's like being a guitarslinger, but more than that too. There's always somebody faster'n you or with better technique. Similarly there's always somebody with better judgment about all those other things but you have to see it and think it important before you will improve.


Originally Posted by robatsu (Post 12962986)
Then start picking out tunes that are *super* familiar and don't have accidentals, you know, Mary had a little lamb, Twinkle Twinkle little star, Jingle Bells, etc.

Mary Had a Little Lamb has a melody?

Q: What color are fleas?
A: White
Mary had a little lamb whose fleas were white as snow.
And everywhere that Mary went her fleas were sure to go.


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