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Ladies road bike restoration for my fiance

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Ladies road bike restoration for my fiance

Old 05-01-11, 12:43 AM
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Ladies road bike restoration for my fiance

Hi all,

Just thought I'd quickly show you a bike I restored for my fiance. Being quite eagle-eyed, she saw it on the side of the road during a vergeside rubbish collection.

We put it in the back of the car and I promised to restore it for her. It took a couple of months and donor parts from around 8 other bikes and I think it came up great!

All up we spent less than half of the cost of an entry-level road bike.

The frame is an early 80's Seiko step through which had stem shifters and safety levers on it when we found it. The frame is a Tamaguchi sports frame, and has Tange Hi-Tensile tubing and althought probably a cheaper bike when new the frame was very light and well made, and the entire bike now is about 10.5kg.

It now has late 80's Shimano 105 derailleur's, Araya alloy rims on Suntour Sprint and Shimano Exage hubs, Dia-Compe Gran Sport levers, Dia-Compe 500 brakes, Champion alloy bars, SunRace indexed DT shifters, Shimano BioPace Sport LX cranks and runs a 13-26 cassette.

Here are some before and after pictures!

As it was found:



After stripping with a wire wheel on the tubes and sandblasting on the fork and lugs:



After powdercoating in Lemon Yellow:



105 derailleurs ready to go on:



Drilled and tapped the rear drop outs to accept an adaptor claw to run a modern derailleur without an integrated claw:



Drilled and tapped the bottom bracket for a cable guide so I could run the shifter cables under the bottom bracket:



The 7 speed sequenced down tube shifters came from eBay, you can also see the gold pinstriping I added to break up all the yellow:



All done:



The only thing I'm not happy with is the seat having those grey panels on it. I'd like an all white seat, but she's happy with the bike so that's what matters. We're going to put white wall tyres on it later and I will probably change the brakes for double pivot callipers aswell.

Hope you like it,

Ben
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Old 05-01-11, 01:58 AM
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nice work
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Old 05-03-11, 07:33 PM
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Thanks dude.
I'd like to put a different saddle on it .. maybe an old Selle Italia .. and I will be ditching the cheap single-pivot dia-compe calipers for something better in future but all in all she loves it so I'm happy.
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Old 05-03-11, 07:37 PM
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That looks like a great rescue and should give years of service. Good job.
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Old 05-03-11, 09:29 PM
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Very nice. I like that yellow.
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Old 05-03-11, 09:41 PM
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That's gorgeous! I love the lavishing of care upon it even though it's "only" HiTen steel.

In the late 70s and early 80s, several Japanese companies were heavily investing in R&D to make better seamed tubing. We usually assume "HiTen" and "seamed" mean "junk", but the technology was developed to make very high quality multi-butted seamed tubing much more cheaply than similar seamless tube. I think bikes like these are the result... it weighs about the same as my similarly-cobbled-together early 1970s Columbus-tubed Italian bike.

I really hated those DiaCompe center pivot calipers, once upon a time. In fact, I replaced them on my partner's mixte. Necessity forced me into trying one on the front of my own bike, and I found that after completely disassembling, cleaning, polishing, and lubricating it that it's actually a very nice and moderately lightweight brake. The key was a light coating of grease on every surface that rubs against another... both sides of every surface in the center pivot stack, as well as on the return springs where they rub against the nubbins on the arms. I liked it so much I sourced a matching rear caliper and polished it up too!

My only quibble would be with the rear brake cable routing. I'd swap the barrel adjuster and the anchor bolt, then route the cable down and around in a big loop, entering the caliper from "beneath". It would look much smoother and probably work more nicely, too. On these Dia-Compe 500 centerpivots, you can just unbolt the barrel adjuster and anchor bolt and swap them -- they have the same diameter holes.
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Old 05-08-11, 12:53 AM
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MrEss : Thanks! The main appeal of the frame was it's lightness and that it was the right size (as my fiance is quite petite) and that it was free. I have been pondering doing that with the rear brake cable .. thanks for the push! I will give it a go, because I've never been totally happy with the rear brake cable routing either. So far despite it's humble origins as a HiTen frame with "PosiTron" gears, with the addition of some high-end 80's components it's made a very nice bike. I think it's about 11kg and that suits her fine.

When I polished up the DiaCompe's I lubricated them with grease on every part in the "stack" and they work very smoothly and quite well for such an old style of calliper. I have one to go on the front that has a quick release that I'll polish up when I get time.

I have got a frame I'm building up for myself now that has forged campagnolo? dropouts and was probably columbus or something similiar tubing. But really, her frame is pretty nicely made for such a humble bike.
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Old 05-25-11, 07:56 PM
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Strangely enough I tried your recommendation on the rear brake cable, and the cable clamp on the bottom of the cable doesn't bolt on - it's an interference fit. D'oh!



As you can see I added an inline lever for the front brake for her as she really wanted an additional lever on the tops and I don't like the original style suicide levers (because of the metal lever pressing directly on the cable.. puts a kink in the cable, which to me says bad idea) so I used a modern cyclocross style lever. This makes riding in traffic a bit easier for her (looking over her shoulder on the drops so she can reach the brake is a bit awkward) but it needs a stronger brake I think.

A couple of companies make long-reach double pivot calipers now so I'll look into them.

I do have a Dia-Compe 500 with quick release to go on the front soon to help take the front wheel off, but ultimately I want double pivot brakes on there anyway.
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Old 05-25-11, 08:17 PM
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Really nice work, well done. I would suggest a couple of simple changes:

Now that you are using interrupt levers, change the main levers to Aero style. Lots of low cost options out there, cable routing would be very tidy.

Get a nice alloy seat post with an integral clamp. Should be able to find one for $10 to $15.

Here's a nice Tektro set of levers, BIN now ebay, free shipping:

https://cgi.ebay.com/New-Tektro-RL340...item2311037656

Last edited by wrk101; 05-25-11 at 08:27 PM.
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Old 05-25-11, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by lunar_c
Drilled and tapped the rear drop outs to accept an adaptor claw to run a modern derailleur without an integrated claw:

have you done this before? it looks like there isn't much material in the dropout for drilling right there.
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Old 05-25-11, 08:51 PM
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+1 the Tektro levers are amazing, especially for the price. I, too, recommend them highly.

The cheap Shimano dual-pivots are pretty good, as are the cheap Tektro ones. The Dia-Compe 500s are pretty good "if you give them enough love" but modern dual-pivots will be more powerful and lower maintenance.
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Old 05-25-11, 09:04 PM
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I really like your TV stand........
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Old 05-25-11, 10:04 PM
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Very nice.
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Old 05-25-11, 10:27 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101
Really nice work, well done. I would suggest a couple of simple changes:

Now that you are using interrupt levers, change the main levers to Aero style. Lots of low cost options out there, cable routing would be very tidy.

Get a nice alloy seat post with an integral clamp. Should be able to find one for $10 to $15.

Here's a nice Tektro set of levers, BIN now ebay, free shipping:

https://cgi.ebay.com/New-Tektro-RL340...item2311037656
Thanks for your suggestions dude.

The lever isn't a permanent addition at this stage so I haven't changed the levers to aero which I'm hesitant to do for this style of bike. The seat post is definitely going in the bin as soon as I find a 25.8 alloy seat post for a reasonable price! I've been keeping an eye out for one.
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Old 05-25-11, 10:34 PM
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Originally Posted by illwafer
have you done this before? it looks like there isn't much material in the dropout for drilling right there.
Sure have dude. I studied production engineering (machining, welding, basic engineering principles etc) back in the day.
That's a 118 degree radiused set screw so it's actually only an M6 thread behind it, just radiused so it's a flush fit. The thread is tapped well within the margins of the drop out which is about 4mm-5mm thick steel. The screw really only locates the claw on the drop out, the axle is what actually clamps it into position.
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Old 05-25-11, 10:35 PM
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Originally Posted by bigbossman
I really like your TV stand........
Cheers dude, but it's actually my mother in laws. She has great taste in furnishings.. my house has a few cast offs from her actually!
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