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Old 11-01-17, 05:28 PM
  #1476  
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Originally Posted by PilotFishBob
Did not realize that - and now I see that's been covered before. Good to know, I stand corrected.
It's sneaky on Trek's part- in the catalog it always states the fork and stays are 531CS. Which leads you to believe they're 531- but for 531CS, the fork and stays are CrMo.

I've put more miles on my 620 than with any other bike in my fleet. (damn... "fleet" I need to cull the herd...) My 620 bridges the "compliant" and the "sturdy" role of the touring bike. Right now, it's built as if someone might have "upgraded" it around 1993 or so, but I'm contemplating doing a 700C/10 speed modernization project like my 720. It's a really special bike.
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Old 11-01-17, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy
It's sneaky on Trek's part- in the catalog it always states the fork and stays are 531CS. Which leads you to believe they're 531- but for 531CS, the fork and stays are CrMo.

I've put more miles on my 620 than with any other bike in my fleet. (damn... "fleet" I need to cull the herd...) My 620 bridges the "compliant" and the "sturdy" role of the touring bike. Right now, it's built as if someone might have "upgraded" it around 1993 or so, but I'm contemplating doing a 700C/10 speed modernization project like my 720. It's a really special bike.
I'm with you on the 'fleet' issue. I'm starting to wonder when the cable hoarding show crew is going to show up at my place. I love my 660, it's a great bike and was my introduction to Campy NR. Everything is original including the Helicomatic-hubbed wheelset which is so far holding up fine.
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Old 11-01-17, 05:40 PM
  #1478  
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If you don't post a picture how do we know you have a 660?
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Old 11-01-17, 05:52 PM
  #1479  
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Originally Posted by eom
If you don't post a picture how do we know you have a 660?
Well, twist my arm why don'tcha? I previously posted this in the "Show your bikes with" thread, don't have a decent drive-side photo handy unfortunately...

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Old 11-01-17, 05:59 PM
  #1480  
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Your bike is very nice.

Mine
5CA5E3CD-85D4-42D5-A6D4-2A073B3A1FA7 (2) by lebagman, on Flickr
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Old 11-01-17, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy
Really simply- until about 1986... the first number is the type of metal the frame is. The lower numbers changed a bit.

200, 300= Hi-Ten
400=Manganese Alloy or Hi Ten depending on the year
500= CrMo either Ishiwata or Reynolds
600= Reynolds 531 main tubes with CrMo or Manganese Alloy fork and stays
700= Reynolds 531 with 531 fork and stays
900= Columbus SL/SP

800 was used for the ATB/Mountain bikes.


the 2nd number was usually the type of bike it was- it changed around from year to year.

The common ones are
0= Sport
1=Sport
2=Touring
3=Racing

The Last number usually denoted the component level on the bike.

It generally held that the lower the number, the less prestigious the group- the higher the number, the more prestigious the group.

After 1986 the nomenclature system changed- but it still held that the higher numbers meant "better" bike and 800s were still ATB/MTBs.
So if I understand a 600 series would be most desirable of Trek lines? Depending on the material used.
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Old 11-01-17, 06:05 PM
  #1482  
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Originally Posted by eom
Your bike is very nice.

Mine
5CA5E3CD-85D4-42D5-A6D4-2A073B3A1FA7 (2) by lebagman, on Flickr
Beauty.
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Old 11-01-17, 06:45 PM
  #1483  
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Originally Posted by Tomsl923833
So if I understand a 600 series would be most desirable of Trek lines? Depending on the material used.
They're all "desirable."

Aside from the first couple of years, Trek's "low end" was like the middle of most manufacturer's lineups. They didn't do "cheap" bikes.

You'll see a lot of people have 400 series Treks, and even though they might have been a step above "entry level," that's the bike they've ridden and chosen to keep. One of the things that stuck with me is a guy who had a 1984 Trek 420 who's bike got damaged in Katrina- he paid a LOT of money to have that bike repaired... much more than it would have taken to buy a new or even different bike. I have a 1986 400 Elance- It's a great riding bike- it fits me so well and the paint is outrageously beautiful... I've got it outfitted with top of the line parts.

Any of the 900 series bikes are really desirable- as is the 170 (which, despite the number, was the top of the line, highest quality racing bike).

If you're looking for an old Trek to hunt for... be familiar with what you're looking for. In other words- if you want a touring bike, get familiar with Trek's different touring lines and how they changed over the years- the TX bikes, the 420, 520, 620 and 720 and the mythical 770. The Sport bikes were often used for tourers and work well with racks and panniers... If you're looking for a racing bike- check out the catalogs at the Vintage Trek site... great stuff in there- plus you get to see what was going on in "bikes" by following the changes.
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Old 11-01-17, 06:53 PM
  #1484  
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Joined the Trek throng

With this 1000, from 1989/90 ... (seller’s pic below)- acquired locally and cheaply (my favorite way)


So far, I’ve just dusted it off, checked that nothing is stuck, got rid of extraneous or worn things like that yellowed pie plate.
Also did a safety check (I was disoconcerted to find that the rear wheel QR was OPEN, and was held in place just by the amount to which it was cranked clockwise).
Gonna change the bar tape, tires... probably not much else for awhile. I’m excited!
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Old 11-01-17, 08:29 PM
  #1485  
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy
They're all "desirable."

Aside from the first couple of years, Trek's "low end" was like the middle of most manufacturer's lineups. They didn't do "cheap" bikes.

You'll see a lot of people have 400 series Treks, and even though they might have been a step above "entry level," that's the bike they've ridden and chosen to keep. One of the things that stuck with me is a guy who had a 1984 Trek 420 who's bike got damaged in Katrina- he paid a LOT of money to have that bike repaired... much more than it would have taken to buy a new or even different bike. I have a 1986 400 Elance- It's a great riding bike- it fits me so well and the paint is outrageously beautiful... I've got it outfitted with top of the line parts.

Any of the 900 series bikes are really desirable- as is the 170 (which, despite the number, was the top of the line, highest quality racing bike).

If you're looking for an old Trek to hunt for... be familiar with what you're looking for. In other words- if you want a touring bike, get familiar with Trek's different touring lines and how they changed over the years- the TX bikes, the 420, 520, 620 and 720 and the mythical 770. The Sport bikes were often used for tourers and work well with racks and panniers... If you're looking for a racing bike- check out the catalogs at the Vintage Trek site... great stuff in there- plus you get to see what was going on in "bikes" by following the changes.

Spot on Golden boy, I like the TX900 for what it represents, nice ride too. But I have an 88 400t that I've totally redone with higher end stuff, and it's the bike that gets the most miles, very smooth. Tim
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Old 11-02-17, 09:11 AM
  #1486  
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Originally Posted by tkamd73
Spot on Golden boy, I like the TX900 for what it represents, nice ride too. But I have an 88 400t that I've totally redone with higher end stuff, and it's the bike that gets the most miles, very smooth. Tim
There were 2 reasons I really wanted to get a TX700.


One- Kind of like you- it represents the beginning of Trek. That was *the* geometry of the original Trek bikes, from Hi-Ten to CrMo to 531. I think the TX900 was different because those were the lengths of stays they could get (and generally what the person who could afford the Columbus tubed bike wanted).


Two- I wanted to see how a bike with (ostensibly) the same tubing as a 78 730 would ride with the longer stays and wheelbase. It didn't do exactly what I expected it to do, but then again- I haven't even really finished setting it up- and I haven't gotten much of any miles on it and I'm using a different wheelset and a stem that's not agreeing with me- so I'm going to do some playing around with it before the snow starts flying.


I don't quite understand how the TX bikes aren't talked about much. Just doing a search for TX700 and you just get a few results. One of the results is a "what's it worth" thread from BF. One of the replies is "The bike isn't anything special..." It's a full 531 framed bike, one of the first few thousand Treks made- I think that's kind of special and unique in a way. I'd figure there's more early Treks in the Milwaukee/Madison corridor than anywhere else in the world- and I haven't seen one in my size for sale on CL (when I was actively looking). I've seen a few TX500s and a few TX700-900s not in my size.


I see a few people here have TX bikes- so they're out there, I guess with all the discussion about "vintage" Treks- I'd expect more discussion or pix on the internets or something.
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Old 11-02-17, 10:23 AM
  #1487  
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There is a TX 770 for sale now on ebay paint is a little beat but it looks like Columbus decals on fork and seat tube https://www.ebay.com/itm/TREK-Tourin...UAAOSwDxFZ4lp2
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Old 11-02-17, 02:43 PM
  #1488  
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Originally Posted by trainman999
There is a TX 770 for sale now on ebay paint is a little beat but it looks like Columbus decals on fork and seat tube
Definitely Columbus decals on the frame. The serial number database at vintage-trek.com does have this note:

Several frames with a leading serial letter of G have been reported with Columbus tubing stickers. TX700 frames were available as special order, with Columbus tubing instead of the specified Reynolds 531. These bikes were designated as Model TX770. However, this model did not appear in any of the Trek brochures on this site.

Vintage Trek Bicycle Frame Serial Numbers, bike

The Zeus crank appears to have the rare 36T inner ring. Nice bike, but I think the asking price is more than a little optimistic.
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Old 11-02-17, 04:31 PM
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JohnDThompson, are there many TX770's out there? were they sold as frames or bikes ? If bikes what group on them?
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Old 11-03-17, 03:58 AM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy
They're all "desirable."

Aside from the first couple of years, Trek's "low end" was like the middle of most manufacturer's lineups. They didn't do "cheap" bikes.

You'll see a lot of people have 400 series Treks, and even though they might have been a step above "entry level," that's the bike they've ridden and chosen to keep. One of the things that stuck with me is a guy who had a 1984 Trek 420 who's bike got damaged in Katrina- he paid a LOT of money to have that bike repaired... much more than it would have taken to buy a new or even different bike. I have a 1986 400 Elance- It's a great riding bike- it fits me so well and the paint is outrageously beautiful... I've got it outfitted with top of the line parts.

Any of the 900 series bikes are really desirable- as is the 170 (which, despite the number, was the top of the line, highest quality racing bike).

If you're looking for an old Trek to hunt for... be familiar with what you're looking for. In other words- if you want a touring bike, get familiar with Trek's different touring lines and how they changed over the years- the TX bikes, the 420, 520, 620 and 720 and the mythical 770. The Sport bikes were often used for tourers and work well with racks and panniers... If you're looking for a racing bike- check out the catalogs at the Vintage Trek site... great stuff in there- plus you get to see what was going on in "bikes" by following the changes.
I actually started my quest with a Schwinn but, I like the look of the Treks. Thanks!!!
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Old 11-03-17, 08:45 AM
  #1491  
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Originally Posted by trainman999
JohnDThompson, are there many TX770's out there? were they sold as frames or bikes ? If bikes what group on them?
I don't think very many were made. They were a special order item, sold as bare frames to be built up by the customer (or LBS) with whatever components they preferred.
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Old 11-03-17, 09:17 AM
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It's only a 400, but it's a very clean 400. I'm thinking skinwall Panaracers and a Brooks.










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Old 11-03-17, 09:17 AM
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Old 11-03-17, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by sloar
It's only a 400, but it's a very clean 400. I'm thinking skinwall Panaracers and a Brooks.










VERY clean . Lmk if you want to unload that saddle.
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Old 11-03-17, 09:24 AM
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Very nice @sloar. That frame is spotless!
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Old 11-03-17, 09:36 AM
  #1496  
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Originally Posted by sloar
It's only a 400, but it's a very clean 400. I'm thinking skinwall Panaracers and a Brooks.
Whoa - very nice.
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Old 11-03-17, 10:08 AM
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Thanks, also came with a pretty nice wheelset. Wolber rims, Miche Competition hubs and a Regina freewheel.












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Old 11-03-17, 10:38 AM
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JohnDThompson, thank you for the info on TX 770. My offer for a TX 770 F/F was accepted, might have more questions when it arrives.
One more for now, remains of Columbus decals on it but no evidence of TREK seat tube decals, could it have been ordered without?
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Old 11-03-17, 07:29 PM
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I found this at an estate sale this morning - 1988 Trek 330. I'm pretty sure it's all original, down to the tires. I wasn't planning on buying another bike after I got my Bianchi but it was my size and it was only $25. I'd like to try and overhaul it so it's in good, safe riding condition come spring. I've never done any bike maintenance beyond changing tires and brake pads, so this promises to be a learning experience. I've got a basic bike toolkit and my next purchase will be a bike stand.

Since this is my first time overhauling a bike, is there anything I'd be better off leaving for my local bike shop? Truing the wheels come to mind but maybe I should learn how to do that? Thanks in advance for any advice.
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Old 11-03-17, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by friendofpugs
I found this at an estate sale this morning - 1988 Trek 330. I'm pretty sure it's all original, down to the tires. I wasn't planning on buying another bike after I got my Bianchi but it was my size and it was only $25. I'd like to try and overhaul it so it's in good, safe riding condition come spring. I've never done any bike maintenance beyond changing tires and brake pads, so this promises to be a learning experience. I've got a basic bike toolkit and my next purchase will be a bike stand.

Since this is my first time overhauling a bike, is there anything I'd be better off leaving for my local bike shop? Truing the wheels come to mind but maybe I should learn how to do that? Thanks in advance for any advice.
You can true wheels without a wheel stand. If your basic bike toolkit can get into the hubs, headset and the bottom bracket, there’s nothing you can’t do for this bike to overhaul it. Those are pretty much the only tool-specific parts when overhauling a bike.

Nice find for $25!
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