Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Whacha know about JC Higgins?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Whacha know about JC Higgins?

Old 06-05-11, 07:55 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Whacha know about JC Higgins?

From what I've searched in the archives theres not a lot of info on these bikes, but I went to check one out and wasnt going to leave without it.

Heres the back story about this steed(the story might get long so i've included pictures for you to check out along the way)



From what the previous owner has told me its from the 70s, I think his former bike shop owner friend gave it to him after closing shop because he had too many bikes left over. The previous owner had never driven it because he is 6'3...



although at one point(~12 years ago) he did rewrap the bars, glue in some new tires and also lost the original seat post...



He said the rims were red label, not sure why he took off the sticker but I dont care. Ive never used tubulars so these things feel like feathers to me, im not gonna complain there.




Other than that everything is original. He seemed happy and surprised that I planned on riding this thing. When I went to take it for a test spin he said that it was actually the bikes maiden voyage, but thats hard to tell. I didnt go far because the brakes needed to be adjusted, he mentioned that the old brake pads were red. Not sure why he changed them, I guess because he felt 30 year old pads should be changed if he was gonna ride it(which he didnt end up doing). I would have prefered some salmon pads and will probably put some on...




Thats pretty much all I know about the bike, now I'd like to know what you know about it. Things like; what kind of cranks are these? There are no markings on it




Why would someone move the shifters down here and mess up the paint in the process?




Whats up with these jockey wheels? Are these typical for the time?

robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-05-11, 07:56 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
What is this? Am I supposed to top up the lube in the BB? Ive never even serviced a cottered crank



This is cool. No question there.


This photo doesnt show it but the skirt(is that a used term?) is kinda wavey on this. Would treating it with a conditioner fix that or should I punch some holes and lace the bottom. Can that be done tastefully?



Whats up with the 'fork' shape on the teeth of some of these?



Im sorry for having so many questions. This bike makes me feel like such a noob. I enjoy this bike quite a lot regardless of know so little about it, I think its a keeper.
I told my girlfriend she could have it, she said she wanted me to paint it purple so then I told her she cant have it. The search continues for a bike to disrespect with purple spray paint.

Hope you enjoy. Thanks guys!
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-05-11, 08:00 PM
  #3  
Forum Moderator
 
cb400bill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Kalamazoo MI
Posts: 20,622

Bikes: Fuji SL2.1 Carbon Di2 Cannondale Synapse Alloy 4 Trek Checkpoint ALR-5 Viscount Aerospace Pro Colnago Classic Rabobank Schwinn Waterford PMount Raleigh C50 Cromoly Hybrid Legnano Tipo Roma Pista

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3082 Post(s)
Liked 6,518 Times in 3,750 Posts
JC Higgins was a house brand of Sears for their sporting goods.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._C._Higgins
__________________












cb400bill is offline  
Old 06-05-11, 08:06 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by cb400bill
JC Higgins was a house brand of Sears for their sporting goods.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._C._Higgins
Thats about as much as my independant research has come up with aswell.
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-05-11, 08:07 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Could the crankset be a "Agrati steel crankset" as seen here on this 1960 Austrian Capo;

https://www.classicrendezvous.com/Austria/Capo.htm
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-05-11, 08:17 PM
  #6  
Chrome Freak
 
Rabid Koala's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Kuna, ID
Posts: 3,208

Bikes: 71 Chrome Paramount P13-9, 73 Opaque Blue Paramount P15, 74 Blue Mink Raleigh Pro, 91 Waterford Paramount, Holland Titanium x2

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 26 Times in 14 Posts
Boy does that bring back memories....

Memories of seeing someone wheel one just like that out of a rummage sale at my grade school before I could get my hands on it! Same color, too. I was in about fifth grade and wanted a 10 speed really, really bad.

That bike would date back to the early 60's.
__________________
1971 Paramount P-13 Chrome
1973 Paramount P-15 Opaque Blue
1974 Raleigh Professional Blue Mink
1991 Waterford Paramount
Holland Titanium Dura Ace Group
Holland Titanium Ultegra Triple Group
Rabid Koala is offline  
Old 06-05-11, 08:31 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
sailorbenjamin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Rhode Island (an obscure suburb of Connecticut)
Posts: 5,630

Bikes: one of each

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Made by Puch or Steyre of Austria. That looks to be a nice one. Most of them were cheap, department store bikes. There were a few that had Reynolds 531 frames. Can you show us the seat tube decals? That upper one might be hiding a tubing sticker. Never seen one with glue up tires. That's gotta be the fastest bike Sears ever sold.
They started way back selling Elgins, made by any one of the big American factories. Then came J C Higgins. Usually the same as the old Elgins, fat, cheap ballooners. I sort of associated the switch to Austrian bikes with the switch to the Ted Williams label but obviously, I'm wrong on that. The Free Spirit came last. They were mostly cheap, too, but look out for the very occassional 531 sticker.
sailorbenjamin is offline  
Old 06-05-11, 11:51 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by sailorbenjamin
Made by Puch or Steyre of Austria. That looks to be a nice one. Most of them were cheap, department store bikes. There were a few that had Reynolds 531 frames. Can you show us the seat tube decals? That upper one might be hiding a tubing sticker. Never seen one with glue up tires. That's gotta be the fastest bike Sears ever sold.
They started way back selling Elgins, made by any one of the big American factories. Then came J C Higgins. Usually the same as the old Elgins, fat, cheap ballooners. I sort of associated the switch to Austrian bikes with the switch to the Ted Williams label but obviously, I'm wrong on that. The Free Spirit came last. They were mostly cheap, too, but look out for the very occassional 531 sticker.
Ill try to remove the bike shop sticker and see if theres a tubing sticker underneath.
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 01:08 AM
  #9  
Large Member
 
realestvin7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tejas
Posts: 2,533
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Nice! 60's Campy Gran Sport bits. I have a RD I just put on Ebay. It looks cool and I can't imagine very many of them were produced/or survived. I would pimp that so hard. Actuallly, I'm slightly jealous.

Forked teeth may be to assist shifting. What brand freewheel is it? Are those Campy GS hubs?
realestvin7 is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 04:41 AM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Lancaster County, PA
Posts: 5,045

Bikes: '39 Hobbs, '58 Marastoni, '73 Italian custom, '75 Wizard, '76 Wilier, '78 Tom Kellogg, '79 Colnago Super, '79 Sachs, '81 Masi Prestige, '82 Cuevas, '83 Picchio Special, '84 Murray-Serotta, '85 Trek 170, '89 Bianchi, '90 Bill Holland, '94 Grandis

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
The untoothed jockey wheels were indeed typical on Gran Sport and early Record Campagnolo derailleurs. The brake calipers are an earlier variant of the 999's with the model info stamped rather than stickered on. The nipple on the top of the BB shell is indeed to lube the BB.
Picchio Special is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 04:42 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Lancaster County, PA
Posts: 5,045

Bikes: '39 Hobbs, '58 Marastoni, '73 Italian custom, '75 Wizard, '76 Wilier, '78 Tom Kellogg, '79 Colnago Super, '79 Sachs, '81 Masi Prestige, '82 Cuevas, '83 Picchio Special, '84 Murray-Serotta, '85 Trek 170, '89 Bianchi, '90 Bill Holland, '94 Grandis

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by realestvin7
I have a RD I just put on Ebay. It looks cool and I can't imagine very many of them were produced/or survived.
Actually, a ton of Gran Sport rear derailleurs were made, and a ton of them have survived - largely because they're basically bomb-proof. The rare ones are the early variants circa 1951-2.
Edit: A quick ebay search reveals 6 currently for sale, and another 6 show up in a completed items search - with several in good condition selling in the low-mid-30-dollar range - not an indicator of a rare item.

Last edited by Picchio Special; 06-06-11 at 04:47 AM.
Picchio Special is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 04:52 AM
  #12  
hi
 
YoKev's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Kingston, NY
Posts: 2,605
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by robertofergy
Ill try to remove the bike shop sticker and see if theres a tubing sticker underneath.
Good luck with that. If you're trying to preserve the bike, this won't most likely preserve the tubing sticker.

Your best bet is to figure out the diameter of the seat post, this will help narrow down/confirm the tubing quality. Secondly, browse some old Sears catalogues.
YoKev is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 05:15 AM
  #13  
The Improbable Bulk
 
Little Darwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA
Posts: 8,379

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 7 Times in 7 Posts
Looks interesting to me...

I haven't heard of a 531 tubed Sears bike other than the Ted Williams, which was later than this one... but there could be something else out there that hasn't been widely identified yet.

I would move the brake levers up to where they belong... On early bikes the levers were located where those are placed, but the levers would have been straight, not curved like yours. (I could be wrong on this, but that placement with those levers just doesn't look right).

My initial thought was that someone had put lipstick on a pig, but it looks like more decent dropouts on there than I expected. Some closer shots of them and the fork ends would be nice to see.
__________________
Slow Ride Cyclists of NEPA

People do not seem to realize that their opinion of the world is also a confession of character.
- Ralph Waldo Emerson
Little Darwin is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 06:36 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by realestvin7
Nice! 60's Campy Gran Sport bits. I have a RD I just put on Ebay. It looks cool and I can't imagine very many of them were produced/or survived. I would pimp that so hard. Actuallly, I'm slightly jealous.

Forked teeth may be to assist shifting. What brand freewheel is it? Are those Campy GS hubs?
Rear hub is Normandy, I'll take a pic of the front one because I don't recognize the symbol.
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 06:48 AM
  #15  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,808

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 584 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1908 Post(s)
Liked 574 Times in 339 Posts
That is a really nice bike!

The only reason I'm not jealous is because it's too small for me. I saw a Sears catalog once, that listed a 531 JC Higgins in it. And I heard somewhere that a JCHiggins won some kind of a prize at the Classic Rendezvouz show in Leesburg a few years ago... anyone know anything about that?

I've worked on a number of Austrian made J C Higgins three speed bikes. They are comparable to Raleigh Sports in the overall look and style, but in the details they are strikingly well made, with forged dropouts and nicely made brazeons here and there, all parts stamped "STYRIA." If this bike was made to the same standards as those, then you've got a very fine machine.

My advice would be that you DO NOT MESS WITH THE STICKERS. They belong where they are. You can easily enough figure out whether the frame is made from special tubing by its weight, seat post size, the tone it makes when tapped, and so on. You are less likely to find confirmation on the bike that it's 531, unless you find a manufacturer's stamp on the steerer tube (pull the fork out). But don't worry about it! That's a great bike, with great components. When this was made, cotteress cranks were very few and far between (Stronglight, possibly Campy, and possibly TA).

Note that the Raleigh Gran Sport of the same era did not have any 531 tubing in it, and it's still a highly desired bike (by some, anyway).


To answer a question or two...

The shifter clamp wasn't tight enough, so when someone tried to shift, the shifters slipped down the tube. Take a look at a later frame, from just about any manufacturer, and you'll see that most of them have a little piece of steel brazed to the down tube to keep the shifters from sliding this way. You might want to epoxy a small piece of something to the underside of the downtube to serve that purpose; done right, no one will ever see it. Alternately, you could just tighten the clamp more, but that's not really such a good idea. If the tubing is thin, you can deform it.

You are missing a pedal dust cap. Try to find a replacement; if you fail, I can suggest a way to make a tolerable replacement.

I would not do anything to the seat. Give it a little proofide and ride it; riding it will force it into the shape that suits you. If the shape is so terrible now that you can't ride it, soak it in water and reshape it to what looks right to you; you may need to tie a towel around it to hold it that way until it dries. Once it dries, it will retain its new shape until you ride it. Whether you reshape it wet or not, it will take a new shape when you ride it; so I'd just ride it.

I would, however, retape the bars (using the same tape if possible) so that I could move the brake levers up to a more fashionable location. The present location is probably period correct, but I couldn't ride it that way!

Last edited by rhm; 06-06-11 at 07:02 AM.
rhm is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 07:12 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by YoKev
Good luck with that. If you're trying to preserve the bike, this won't most likely preserve the tubing sticker.

Your best bet is to figure out the diameter of the seat post, this will help narrow down/confirm the tubing quality. Secondly, browse some old Sears catalogues.
The seat post says 25.8. It was in there pretty tight, but it wasnt stuck so that was awesome.
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 07:16 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm
I would not do anything to the seat. Give it a little proofide and ride it; riding it will force it into the shape that suits you. If the shape is so terrible now that you can't ride it, soak it in water and reshape it to what looks right to you; you may need to tie a towel around it to hold it that way until it dries. Once it dries, it will retain its new shape until you ride it. Whether you reshape it wet or not, it will take a new shape when you ride it; so I'd just ride it.

I would, however, retape the bars (using the same tape if possible) so that I could move the brake levers up to a more fashionable location. The present location is probably period correct, but I couldn't ride it that way!
Thanks, thats good advice. The saddle isnt that bad at all, just cosmetic really.
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 07:20 AM
  #18  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by realestvin7
What brand freewheel is it? Are those Campy GS hubs?
Darn it! I forgot to take a closer pic of the freewheel. oh well, that can wait until after work I guess





robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 07:29 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by Little Darwin
Some closer shots of them and the fork ends would be nice to see.
Here ya go. Also, heres a shot of the non-drive side so you can see the internal routing for the rear brake cable.





robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 10:41 AM
  #20  
Large Member
 
realestvin7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tejas
Posts: 2,533
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Picchio Special
Actually, a ton of Gran Sport rear derailleurs were made, and a ton of them have survived - largely because they're basically bomb-proof. The rare ones are the early variants circa 1951-2.
Edit: A quick ebay search reveals 6 currently for sale, and another 6 show up in a completed items search - with several in good condition selling in the low-mid-30-dollar range - not an indicator of a rare item.
I was referring to the bike as a whole. not the derailleur. One of those on ebay is mine.

This is turning out to be a cool mofo. That front hub is cool.
realestvin7 is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 11:15 AM
  #21  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,808

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 584 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1908 Post(s)
Liked 574 Times in 339 Posts
Originally Posted by robertofergy
The seat post says 25.8. It was in there pretty tight, but it wasnt stuck so that was awesome.
Oh, well, that sounds like gaspipe.

But take a peek down the inside of the seat tube. My 531 butted Raleigh Record Ace takes a 25.4 post; there's a 4" long shim brazed to the inside the top of the seat tube to accommodate the standard 1" post. If you have something like that, then you may still have a lightweight frame.
rhm is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 01:18 PM
  #22  
Get off my lawn!
 
Velognome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Garden State
Posts: 6,031

Bikes: 1917 Loomis, 1923 Rudge, 1930 Hercules Renown, 1947 Mclean, 1948 JA Holland, 1955 Hetchins, 1957 Carlton Flyer, 1962 Raleigh Sport, 1978&81 Raleigh Gomp GS', 2010 Raliegh Clubman

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 98 Times in 48 Posts
Chromed ends, lined lugs nice looking chainring and cranks, plus campy bits and internal brake line. Even if it is gaspipe, it's still way cool.

Keep me away from it, I'd have a pair of polished aluminum shorties on it by know

Last edited by Velognome; 06-06-11 at 01:22 PM.
Velognome is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 01:49 PM
  #23  
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, NY, and High Falls, NY, USA
Posts: 40,475

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 511 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7329 Post(s)
Liked 2,419 Times in 1,414 Posts
Is the QR skewer on the rear wheel clamped properly?
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 03:36 PM
  #24  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
robertofergy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
Posts: 320

Bikes: 1978 Raleigh Super Grand Prix, 1997 Koga Miyata GranSpeed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by noglider
Is the QR skewer on the rear wheel clamped properly?
I havent even touched the rear QR yet, but the front one sure was clamped improperly. I think the guy did one of those "spin the lever like its a rachet until the wheel stays" kinda things on the front one, ill check out the rear one tomorrow. Its me and my GFs anniversary today so I cant play with bikes today



Ill also check to see if theres a shim in the seat post tube. I had only pulled the post out far enough that I could see where it said the size.
robertofergy is offline  
Old 06-06-11, 04:16 PM
  #25  
No Money and No Sense
 
sillygolem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Anderson, MO
Posts: 705
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Puch started making bikes for Sears sometime in the late '50's-early 60's. IIRC, they started with the 3-speeds and moved on to add the 10-speeds to the lineup. Sears' sporting goods were called JC Higgins starting in the '30's, switching over to Ted Williams in the early 70's after they licensed his name - the bikes followed suit, adding "Free Spirit." Sears started selling Huffys alongside the Puchs from the mid-70's up until the Austrian company's collapse in the mid-80's: They're still shown in the catalogs at least until '83. The Puchs are easily identifiable by their lugged frames.

AFAIK, the only Ted Williams Puch bikes that got a Campy grupo were a few given out at a stockholder's meeting: It's interesting that this seems to be a stock bike. You might want to check out wishbookweb.com to see if you can find this particular model in one of their scanned catalogs.

As for the oil port, the BB is designed to use regular grease, which is refreshed with a few drops of oil now and then. You really don't need to reoil with modern grease.

EDIT: Found it! '69 Christmas catalog, looks like it's the same color.
https://www.wishbookweb.com/1969_Sear...ogPage0426.jpg

Last edited by sillygolem; 06-06-11 at 04:26 PM. Reason: Found it!
sillygolem is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.