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Campagnolo headset quality control inspector takes a holiday

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Campagnolo headset quality control inspector takes a holiday

Old 06-26-11, 06:56 PM
  #26  
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There was a recent thread about this exact topic. I need to try the knurling on my Motobecane. They also mentioned putting auto body filler in there-- combined with the knurling it is supposedly very tight when it's done.
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Old 06-26-11, 07:51 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by kroozer View Post
There was a recent thread about this exact topic. I need to try the knurling on my Motobecane. They also mentioned putting auto body filler in there-- combined with the knurling it is supposedly very tight when it's done.
Well, bear in mind that headsets don't last forever, so someone is going to have to press it back out again someday. Have pity on that person.
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Old 06-26-11, 08:54 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
Well, bear in mind that headsets don't last forever, so someone is going to have to press it back out again someday. Have pity on that person.
I don't think the filler will create a very strong bond, but I don't think it is necessary either. I admit that before I even suggested dimpling I did consider that the headset cup is a lot harder than a fork crown seat so it might not work as well, but the threw it out there anyway. Personally I'd still try it and I very strongly doubt that dimpling the cup and pressing it in is going to do any significant damage to the headtube. I would do an evenly distributed low density dimpling first and if it starts to go in super easy, stop and knock it back out.. probably will have done nothing to the frame. Then double the density and press it back in. You should be able to feel on the first installation whether doubling the density is going to be enough based on the difference between non-dimpled and the first trial.
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Old 06-27-11, 07:03 AM
  #29  
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and if a soda can is the wrong thickness, and you need something else, I've got brass shim stock in various thicknesses. just let me know if you need a piece or two.
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Old 06-27-11, 07:44 AM
  #30  
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I'm with the "shim it" camp. Aluminum, brass, steel, try 'em. Something in the recycle bin will work.
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Old 06-27-11, 06:10 PM
  #31  
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Success! Miamijim, I owe you a beer, and will even let you keep the can for shim stock. Despite my skepticism, it worked like a charm. I cut a strip of aluminum from an iced tea can that was just a hair wider than the pressed-in part of the cup. I had been concerned about preventing the strip from buckling and slipping out of place as I pressed it in. To prevent that, I wrapped the strip once around the cup, and wrapped a rubber band around it half a dozen times or so to keep it held tightly against the cup, and pushed the mass of rubber band up with my thumbnail to clear a little strip at the bottom where the shim strip and cup fit into the head tube (photo worth 1,000 words above) I pressed it in a few turns to make sure the strip was engaged all the way around, then cut the rubber band loose and pressed it the rest of the way in.
Sheer dumb luck that a strip of can stock wrapped all the way around once turned out to be perfect--it's possible that Tullio Campagnolo planned it that way. What's can stock, something like 0.005"? Apparently this cup was just about 0.01" undersized, because it pressed in perfectly with the shim--I'm not a human torque wrench or anything, but I've pressed in enough headsets to know when the amount of resistance is just about right.
Very nice. This was lot more satisfying (and cheaper) than buying a new headset. Thanks, everyone.
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Old 06-28-11, 06:02 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by jonwvara View Post
Success! Miamijim, I owe you a beer, and will even let you keep the can for shim stock. Despite my skepticism, it worked like a charm. I cut a strip of aluminum from an iced tea can that was just a hair wider than the pressed-in part of the cup. I had been concerned about preventing the strip from buckling and slipping out of place as I pressed it in. To prevent that, I wrapped the strip once around the cup, and wrapped a rubber band around it half a dozen times or so to keep it held tightly against the cup, and pushed the mass of rubber band up with my thumbnail to clear a little strip at the bottom where the shim strip and cup fit into the head tube (photo worth 1,000 words above) I pressed it in a few turns to make sure the strip was engaged all the way around, then cut the rubber band loose and pressed it the rest of the way in.
Sheer dumb luck that a strip of can stock wrapped all the way around once turned out to be perfect--it's possible that Tullio Campagnolo planned it that way. What's can stock, something like 0.005"? Apparently this cup was just about 0.01" undersized, because it pressed in perfectly with the shim--I'm not a human torque wrench or anything, but I've pressed in enough headsets to know when the amount of resistance is just about right.
Very nice. This was lot more satisfying (and cheaper) than buying a new headset. Thanks, everyone.
I didnt want to say alot about 'shimming' as I figured there'd be some scepticism. Back in my shop days we had a few random cans on the work bench for this type of repair. Mostly it was for fork races but on occasion we'd shim headset cups. My technique was much simpler, I'd cut two strips and place one end in the head tube and wrap the other end around the outside. I'd use 2 strips to help 'center' the cup (wishfull thinking). I'd then press the cups in and trim the excess.
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Old 06-28-11, 04:36 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by miamijim View Post
I didnt want to say alot about 'shimming' as I figured there'd be some scepticism. Back in my shop days we had a few random cans on the work bench for this type of repair. Mostly it was for fork races but on occasion we'd shim headset cups. My technique was much simpler, I'd cut two strips and place one end in the head tube and wrap the other end around the outside. I'd use 2 strips to help 'center' the cup (wishfull thinking). I'd then press the cups in and trim the excess.
Your method sounds good to me, though I'd probably use 4 or even 6 shim strips to get an even fit all the way around. But given the need to trim, I don't know if it's necessarily faster. Sounds foolproof, though. Thanks again for getting my thoughts moving in the right direction.
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Old 06-28-11, 11:41 PM
  #34  
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I would hardly consider Arizona as "tea." More like sugar water.

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Old 06-29-11, 04:43 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by DRietz View Post
I would hardly consider Arizona as "tea." More like sugar water.

I don't drink it so I wouldn't know--it was just the first can I was able to lay my hands on. Cool paint job, too.
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