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Sliding a Nitto quill stem onto Nitto handle bar

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Sliding a Nitto quill stem onto Nitto handle bar

Old 07-19-11, 05:04 PM
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Sliding a Nitto quill stem onto Nitto handle bar

I can't seem to get it around the curve.

How do you do it without grinding huge gashes into the bar?
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Old 07-19-11, 05:09 PM
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An obvious one, but just in case, did you turn the stem all different ways around the bar to get it to slide on? I have had one stem that I had to use a really thick flat-head screwdriver to pry the opening open a bit while I was sliding the stem onto the bar. It Wouldn't go on normally.
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Old 07-19-11, 05:11 PM
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the only problem I have getting stems around bends is when bars are ergo shaped or have grooves for cables.

I usually wedge it open to get it around the bends/over the clamp sleeve.
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Old 07-19-11, 05:13 PM
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Yeah, I was turning it...wrong? I guess I need to find something that will pry open the stem.
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Old 07-19-11, 05:18 PM
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also take the stem out to make it easier. and don't forget 25.4 vs 26.0.
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Old 07-19-11, 06:03 PM
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The underside of the bar "knuckle" is usually less wide than the upper surface; orient that narrower part to the inside of handlebar curves.
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Old 07-19-11, 06:11 PM
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I have found that wedging a stack of Penneys into the stem opening will spread out the stem enough to get the handle bar in - This is a very very common problem...

Now if its a French stem... Duh... DuhDuh... Duh... Well you know how it goes...
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Old 07-19-11, 11:25 PM
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I use a wooden wedge cut to fit the specific stem since they all have different clamp openings. It's best to use a hardwood scrap like oak or maple, but whatever is around will do. Just hammer it into the clamp opening until you can slide the handlebar, doesn't take much. The pictured wedge is cherry and cut to fit a Cinelli stem.
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Old 07-20-11, 01:52 AM
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Originally Posted by RoboChrist
I can't seem to get it around the curve.

How do you do it without grinding huge gashes into the bar?
Like other wrote, you need to open up the clamp area a bit and wiggle the handlebar through by rotating the handlebar with respect to the different widths of the stem clamp. Typically, if the stem has a threaded part, one can usually thread the bolt from the normal side and butt it up against a penny like so...



However, quite a few Nitto stems have a replaceable nut (read: not fixed) instead of the threads being cut/cast/rolled into the stem body, so Nitto actually sell a tool just for this purpose. It's a bit pricey though...


Clicky image
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Old 07-20-11, 05:07 AM
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One thing most people do wrong is to try and fight the handlebars into place. The second thing most people do not do is feel the handlebars into place.

You must make small, non-aggressive, moves while getting the bars around curves. Put the clamp gap to the inside of the curve and you will have better luck. Also, if the stem starts to stick - STOP! Do not force anything, force will just make things worse. And do not force rotation thinking that the bars will go. The bars will just get gouged.


Good luck and, if you take your time, practice might shed some positive results.

As you enter the curve, move the stem around until you feel a bit of progress and then just keep feeling your way along, never, never forcing anything. When you get to the clamp section of the bars, I suggest a lubricant of some kind if things are still tight. Dish soap works well in this situation.

So, be gentle, work slowly and watch what you are doing. Also, a couple of cone wrenches work well as a lever when attempting to spread the stem clamp a little bit.

Hope that is a help.
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Old 07-20-11, 05:52 AM
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If the stem clamp is threaded insert the bolt from the opposite side and put a dime in the gap. Tightening the bolt against the dime spreads the clamp.
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Old 07-20-11, 07:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Fred Smedley
If the stem clamp is threaded insert the bolt from the opposite side and put a dime in the gap. Tightening the bolt against the dime spreads the clamp.

Hmm, sounds expensive.

I think I'll stick with the penny trick mentioned above.
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Old 07-21-11, 10:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Fred Smedley
If the stem clamp is threaded insert the bolt from the opposite side and put a dime in the gap. Tightening the bolt against the dime spreads the clamp.
Heres another one for my note book - THANKS...
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Old 07-21-11, 10:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Charles Wahl
The underside of the bar "knuckle" is usually less wide than the upper surface; orient that narrower part to the inside of handlebar curves.
+1. When you do this, you have to think a little bit about how you pivot the stem from one curve to the other, but it works for typical bars/stems.

You can put some water on the pieces, water is a good lubricant and no messy cleanup.
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Old 07-21-11, 11:50 PM
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I didn't have any problems with my Nitto Technomic and Nitto B177 bars.....slid into place with no probs at all.
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