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Campagnolo's Second Golden Age? (Best generation of Ergopower?)

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Campagnolo's Second Golden Age? (Best generation of Ergopower?)

Old 09-18-11, 03:38 PM
  #76  
Oregon Southpaw
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I read this thread with interest. I'd love to go ergo-power someday...

Anyways I know carbon isn't huge around here but some of my more modern riding counterparts swear by their carbon cranks. Have any of you guys noticed a significant difference? A friend of mine even says that he'd rather ride a lesser frame with carbon cranks instead of a better one with alloy. I suspect they've drank the carbon-aide...
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Old 09-18-11, 03:54 PM
  #77  
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i am going to be upgrading my alloy chorus 10 crankset with a pair of 2007 record ultra torque cranks. i hope the improvement is that good. (my record 10 group is finally complete!)

they are actually going on a lesser aluminum frame (until i can find my elusive silver s-works E5 frameset)
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Old 09-18-11, 04:22 PM
  #78  
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Originally Posted by Oregon Southpaw View Post
I read this thread with interest. I'd love to go ergo-power someday...

Anyways I know carbon isn't huge around here but some of my more modern riding counterparts swear by their carbon cranks. Have any of you guys noticed a significant difference? A friend of mine even says that he'd rather ride a lesser frame with carbon cranks instead of a better one with alloy. I suspect they've drank the carbon-aide...
I haven't noticed it. I think the way modern bbs are integrated makes a difference, and the ceramic bearings make a difference, but not the crank arm material.
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Old 09-18-11, 05:16 PM
  #79  
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Originally Posted by Oregon Southpaw View Post
I read this thread with interest. I'd love to go ergo-power someday...

Anyways I know carbon isn't huge around here but some of my more modern riding counterparts swear by their carbon cranks. Have any of you guys noticed a significant difference? A friend of mine even says that he'd rather ride a lesser frame with carbon cranks instead of a better one with alloy. I suspect they've drank the carbon-aide...
If there is a difference it must be small. I have a bike with Record Carbon 10 and others with alloy cranks. I think differences in frame flex is a lot more noticeable that crank flex.
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Old 09-18-11, 06:22 PM
  #80  
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Here's my 2 cents, in no particular order:

I hear certain years of Centaur 10 speed were really good, but I concentrate on Chorus level and above, and all the comments below reflects this.

8 speed stuff is nice, both to use and in aesthetics. This group was 100% alloy in all it's incarnations, which looks at home on vintage steel. Rugged and very positive shifting which takes some finger effort. No mushy 'did I shift or not' feedback like 8 speed DA. The group is not lightweight by carbon standards, or maybe even compared to early eighties SR. But, heck, it's predecessor/influence was C-Record which mostly sported massive chunks of 'aero' shaped aluminium.

8 speed, if one desires a strict period built, have narrow gearing choices. I have seen on eBay, very rarely, claims of long cage derailleurs and 28T cogs, but mostly 39/26 is bottom end. Triple cranks may or may not have been around back then (the medium quality Racing T group), compacts certainly was not.

My older square taper 10 speed Record/Chorus mixed group is even nicer and represents the finest in modern, full aluminium that I have experience with. The shifting is still very positive, with nice audible clicks, but doesn't require as much effort. While I'm not entirely sure which shifter type is on my bike, I like the ability to drop half a cassette in one go. The front ratchet-shifts in short increments so the there's never any chain rub, but this is the case with all my indexed Campy. It stays in tune forever. Compact cranks and up to 29T cogs are floating around out there in good quantities.

Now 11 speed, of which I have a 2011 Chorus group with Record hubs, is all business. Everything is black, whether carbon or aluminium, with no polish or full-on art projects like Delta brakes. In fact many of the little black pieces are, upon closer scrutiny, basically just plastic... But the weight is way down compared to 8 speed. The shifters are truly Ergo in all their radical shapes and curves (thus feel the best of all generations). I treat this stuff with a different mindset too: Use it and abuse it, if need be, in the heat of hard riding. I've been shifting up the cassette, without easing up, while climbing out of the saddle. Cross chaining ignorantly for miles. Wet and gritty conditions with a dry chain. Dropping the bike onto the drive side without getting teary eyed. So far all has been working flawlessly. Highly recommended.

Last edited by jan nikolajsen; 09-18-11 at 06:27 PM.
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Old 12-03-15, 02:44 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by visigoth View Post
All this to say -- in answer to the rhetorical question, "is there anything better looking then polished campy AL?" -- no.
+1 . I have whole set of Campy 9 speed chorus AL which I will put on my next new frame . I have campy chorus 10 speed on one bike and 11 speed on another bike .
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Old 12-03-15, 03:14 PM
  #82  
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I have never bought an Ergopower group. I have, however, bought the brifters and rear derailleurs for several bikes that originally had Record or Super Record parts. (Yes, I spread the frames and replaced the rear hub as well.) They are good stuff. Recently, though, I have been enjoying bikes with bar-end shifters. On a recent bike (a Centurion LeMans RS) I built it up with a lot of old Campy Record components and wanted to use bar-ends with an Ergopower ten speed rear. Fortunately, I discovered that Campagnolo actually had made a bar end shifter for a ten speed! So I was able to use the lovely old Record brake levers with modern ten speed gearing. Lovely to ride!
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Old 12-03-15, 05:47 PM
  #83  
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Well since this thread's alive again I'll update my post (#56) from 2011;

2008 Centaur Escape shifters weren't so good. The rear wore out about a year ago with no replacement parts available. A glass filled nylon ratchet wheel (the downshift catch wheel)
went south.

The 2008 Centaur read der parallelogram pivots on the outer (carbon) plate wore badly resulting in a lot of play and corresponding lousy shifting.

Bike now has 2014 Centaur red shifters and a 2014 Veloce alloy rear derraileur (it's a tank). I've laid in a set late 10 speed Record Ergopower shifters as spares.
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Old 12-03-15, 06:04 PM
  #84  
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I have several Ergopower setups from 1993 7-speed to late 10-speed. 2 setups stand out.

- Circa 1997 Record Titanium 8-speed. This works so well. So smooth and perfect shifting. The shifters are easy to service.

- The 2006 Chorus 10-speed system I rode today. How can mechanical shifting get any better? I don’t know.

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Old 12-03-15, 06:36 PM
  #85  
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I posted a while ago as was experiencing driveline wear on my new plastic bike - 10sp Veloce Bianchi Sempre Pro.
Due to the spacers being out of order on the cassette, it slipped out of certain gears for months until the bike shop decided to look at the problem and not blame the rider. I also broke the original chain, the cassette wore out and the freehub was replaced, the chainrings were on their way out too. I'd had enough at this point and sold the bike.
Once spacers were sorted on the cassette, it changed beautifully with short movements and I could get on and enjoy the ride. The down changes were excessively weighty - not harsh, but remember thinking "well they're going to wear out soon".
The consensus was the modern gear is disposable and the cut off for robustness was early 90s.
I have a early 90s Vetta with 8sp Veloce well worn now but still chugs along, after the International will do a restore as that will be my hammer bike.
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