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another reason to love vintage bikes

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another reason to love vintage bikes

Old 09-06-11, 05:56 PM
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sloar
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another reason to love vintage bikes

i picked up a 1963 columbia firebolt the other day, got it cheap and it was pretty cool looking. but i didnt notice until i got it home that its got the bendix red band 2 speed kickback hub on it, never rode one of these before, its awesome. its also got the original chain oiler on the inside of the chain guard with felt pads. these old bikes always seem to impress me. now if i can just find a tank and headlight assembly i will be set.
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Old 09-06-11, 06:51 PM
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Nice catch! Riding bikes like old middleweights and balooners is just a different feel than anything else. Best of luck with it.
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Old 09-06-11, 07:00 PM
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Riding bikes like old middleweights and balooners is just a different feel than anything else.
That is exactly true, as far as I am concerned. Though I have had little interest in most of the Roadsters that I have owned, I do feel from time to time that one day I just might switch camps. Even now, I am thinking of no more drop bars. My busted neck gets too sore riding in an aggressive position. But I have to admit, I enjoyed my rides on this old Victoria...
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Old 09-06-11, 07:16 PM
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Originally Posted by FlatTop View Post
Nice catch! Riding bikes like old middleweights and balooners is just a different feel than anything else. Best of luck with it.
I've never been much for ballooners, but I repaired a '57 Schwinn Corvette not long ago - and it was a surprisingly fun ride at full tilt through a bumpy boatyard. On the other hand, a fully-equipped '58 Jaguar wasn't half as enjoyable through the same boatyard; tank and all.

Both bikes were nearly mint, and I serviced whatever was wrong on them before taking them for a spin. I believe the North Road-esque bars on the Corvette had something to do with the ride; more compact and easier to manage. Same went for a '62 Schwinn Debutante at the same place - rode like the Corvette; just with a coaster.

Only have a photo of the Debutante; it's to the left of the early frame:


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Old 09-06-11, 07:52 PM
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How is it riding a kickback hub? I have one in pieces that I'd like to do something with.

The cruisers do fill a need that no other bike does. A three mile low-speed pedal is better than no pedal at all.
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Old 09-06-11, 08:00 PM
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the kickback is awesome, both gears seems just right.
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Old 09-06-11, 11:02 PM
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Funny how those old bikes we used to have seem so much easier and more pleasurable to ride. At least that's the way I remember it. Of course, I also remember having to zig-zag up steep hills with a one-speed. Sweet nostalgia...
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