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Post your Centurion Ironman.. For the love of 80s paint jobs!

Old 08-06-20, 07:15 PM
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Originally Posted by stilllearning

Here's a photo of my 86 after some recent changes.

Thanks for your help and I will continue to lurk and learn.
Brian
Sometimes, we accidentally actually know what we’re doing. It comes from being very experienced at making mistakes.
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Old 08-06-20, 07:25 PM
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Here it is again. Great Googly Moogly!!!

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Old 08-06-20, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes
Sometimes, we accidentally actually know what we’re doing. It comes from being very experienced at making mistakes.
Agreed. Plus your finished product looked so much like the one I rode at Thunder Ridge a few years ago I did a double-take.
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Old 08-06-20, 08:58 PM
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Congratulations on getting your Ironman even better suited to you! It's a beauty.

Originally Posted by stilllearning
As I wrestled with what to do, I remembered reading on this forum that a 130 hub would fit my Ironman. So, I tried putting in the R500 on the Ironman, and it went in with no problems. Next, thanks, to this forum, after I found out that friction shifting would work on 9 speeds, I came up with a new idea. Why not keep the 50/34 and put the R500 with 11-34 cassette and Deore RD on the Ironman? I get the lower gearing, and maybe since I got such a good deal on the Zurich, I could sell it at a higher price to cover some of the expenses in all this?
I'm considering going a similar route with my '86: 8-speed and compact. It's my favorite ride (out of two), and I'm comfortable now with the downtube shifters(*) to ride with buddies and not worry about falling behind due to a wrong shift or dropped chain. But days I push the climbing, the knees are sometimes unhappy the next day.

The 600 EX FD you mention handled the compact crankset OK?

And, you felt that the rear dropouts were parallel enough without cold setting and bending? That's a step that kind of scares me.

(*) Half the fear was my ham-handed lmit adjustment, and half operation. I was pushing on a ride and tried to do a lightning drop from the 52 to 39, and dumped the chain down onto the BB. White paint under the red, I found. Checking limits afterwards, it seemed impossible.
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Old 08-06-20, 10:29 PM
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I am still using the original 600 FD with the 50/34. It would have also handled a triple crank if I had gone that route. Seypat put a nice thread with photos titled Lower gears/cranks/rings etc info showing the 600s ability to work with that setup.
No cold set required. It went in much easier than I thought it would. Lots of information on the forum about doing that, which I finally remembered reading about. I enjoy seeing what others have done and was able to utilize some of those ideas.
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Old 08-06-20, 11:03 PM
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Hey, have any of y'all replaced your Ironman bottom bracket with a Shimano BB-UN55? If so, what size? I bought three of 'em from REI for $8 apiece, apparently blowing 'em out for some reason. Kinda curious to try one, but I don't want to disassemble the Suntour BB unless I have the right replacement.
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Old 08-07-20, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat
Hey, have any of y'all replaced your Ironman bottom bracket with a Shimano BB-UN55? If so, what size? I bought three of 'em from REI for $8 apiece, apparently blowing 'em out for some reason. Kinda curious to try one, but I don't want to disassemble the Suntour BB unless I have the right replacement.
My wife's'86 has one. It seems it would just be regular size for Ironman. 68x113.
They're good enough, no fuss no bother.
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Old 08-07-20, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes
80.4 on Sunday. '96 Litespeed, by W. David Lynskey....

Decided to win every hill (5600' if you used Strava or RideWithGPS, 4600' on my Garmin).
Didn't, but probably 75% of 'em. At a price.

Group of six, then picked up 2. As the 8 of us climbed the increasingly roller-coaster terrain, we topped one hill, and the route guru said "it gets worse." We looked ahead, and sure enough, there were more of the roller-coasters ahead. Discouraging view. I turned to one of the others and said "we can crest that first one; after that, it's a reach-around." He laughed, and off we went. By hitting close to 40 on the down, we managed to 90% "crest" the first one. By the middle of the second one, I'm on the small ring, and by the top, I've only got one cog left. Made it up, gasping, and he rolled up and said "that there was a man-maker." I said "this may be the last time this 11-28 goes outside." He says "sh--, you don't have a compact?" I look down, "now you tell me."

The last serious climb (Allenton, by Six Flags) has kicked my butt before, mainly because some of us go for it there. This time, I decided to start on the small ring and just try to cruise it. Amazing what happens when you decide not to suffer. Gave up 1-2 mph and actually could whistle on the climb. After that, I see the first GP5000 failure ever, on a friend's bike. Bead failure created a slow leak, and then the replacement blew in about 2 minutes. Booted the bead and off we went. Next day, could barely climb stairs.

Week before, I had a modern faceplate, sort of, on a modern stem fail after a 35mph descent. I rode it 2 miles not knowing, with maybe 1 sq mm of metal on each side of the faceplate still existing, for the two bottom holes. How it did not plant my face on the pavement, I do not know. Do not buy the Chinese face-plate mounted Garmin/HL mounts. You may not be so lucky. I found it out at a stop, and re-worked it. Next day, one of the upper bolts had pulled out, too, stripped the threads inside the stem. So I'm likely not to buy any more Chinese stems, either.

And I bought two bikes. Centurion Prestige that needs a ton of stuff. And a modern bike. We won't talk about that.
Is the modern bike another ghost?
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Old 08-07-20, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by stilllearning

Here's a photo of my 86 after some recent changes. I don't make too many posts as I spend most of my time lurking and learning, but I wanted to give a thanks to this forum for being a great resource. I recently finished lowering the gearing on my Ironman after months of being unsure of what to do. I especially wanted to thank seypat and rccardr for their suggestions and advice.

The bike had a 50/34 with 14-28 seven speed that was okay for what I was climbing, but my legs were telling me I needed to lower things a bit. I got a triple crank I was all set to install with a Suntour VGT Luxe RD. Seypat was very gracious in answering my questions and even went out of his way to create a new thread, complete with photos, showing the 600 EX FD could handle the triple.

Here is where things start to go in a different direction. I have wanted a Lemond for quite awhile, so when I saw a 2000 Zurich that had a triple crank at a price that was too good to pass up, I jumped on it, and decided to focus on that instead of the Ironman. I wasn't thrilled with the Zurich's current wheelset, so I was happy when I saw a Shimano R500 wheelset in great condition at a good price. I bought a nine speed 11-34 cassette and Deore M591 RD to handle things, and thought I was all set.

However, before I made the changes to the Zurich, I took it for one more ride, and couldn't get rid of the uneasiness that I felt. I know it's a better quality bike, but I just didn't feel comfortable on it. I went a size down, based on what I had read about Lemonds, but it still felt too stretched out. I figured a shorter stem would help, but had already reached the max I wanted to spend, and, there was no guarantee that would solve my issues. Also, I realized that my Ironman was already dialed in, and I really liked the ride.

As I wrestled with what to do, I remembered reading on this forum that a 130 hub would fit my Ironman. So, I tried putting in the R500 on the Ironman, and it went in with no problems. Next, thanks, to this forum, after I found out that friction shifting would work on 9 speeds, I came up with a new idea. Why not keep the 50/34 and put the R500 with 11-34 cassette and Deore RD on the Ironman? I get the lower gearing, and maybe since I got such a good deal on the Zurich, I could sell it at a higher price to cover some of the expenses in all this?

Well, that's what I ended up doing, as I made enough on the sale of the Zurich to cover what I spent on the R500 wheels. So even though I didn't put on a triple, I am still very thankful for the advice I received. I went a different route, but this forum's advice in the other areas was just as helpful!

Thanks for your help and I will continue to lurk and learn.
Brian
Super hot!
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Old 08-07-20, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by tgot
Half the fear was my ham-handed lmit adjustment, and half operation. I was pushing on a ride and tried to do a lightning drop from the 52 to 39, and dumped the chain down onto the BB. White paint under the red, I found. Checking limits afterwards, it seemed impossible.
Even with limit screws properly set, this can happen somewhat easily if you are cross-chained in the big ring and dump it to the little ring, I've had that happen before with a "perfect" FD setup...
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Old 08-07-20, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by canklecat
I borrowed a nice wheelset from a friend for the Ironman -- Mavic CXP21 rims on Ultegra hubs. Gotta return 'em eventually. I had to swipe a cassette from another wheel, an older Bontrager Race Lite Aero with an old school DT Swiss hub that needs to be overhauled, and I can't figure out how to disassemble the darned thing. It's not the current type with bits that pull off to reveal the cartridge bearings.

Fortunately the cassette and spacers were perfect for the Ironman, didn't even need to tweak the rear derailleur. Those SunRace freewheels and cassettes are perfectly happy with Suntour and Shimano drivetrains. Must be the beveled and angled teeth, and chromed finish. Snick snick shifting, runs quietly, no drama.

Anyway, since I had the wheels for a couple of weeks I rode the Ironman for the first time in three weeks. I've mostly been riding my 30 lb Univega, so the Ironman felt like a featherweight.

I didn't really have any plans for the Saturday ride, so I just hopped on the bike and headed west of town. After about 20 miles of warmup I realized how much lighter the Ironman felt than the Univega (hey, 25 lbs feels light after riding a 30+ lb hybrid with 700x42 tires for a month). So I tackled some hill repeats.

There's a new housing development that's stalled due to the pandemic and economic slowdown. But they'd finished the streets. To keep it picturesque (very pricey McMansions, in the $500k and up range) they just paved over the rolling hills so there's lots of opportunities for prospective buyers to be kings of their own mountains.

Some of those streets are double digit grades, 0.2-0.3 miles each. So I did several hill repeats, mostly standing to climb the whole way. Did that for 10-11 miles until my legs were cooked.

By then I had almost 40 miles in and my neck was aching, so I headed home to eat and use my percussion massager. But a couple hours later I felt great again and decided to go for a full century, figuring I'd finish by midnight.

Nope. After another 20 miles I was done. Headed home and finished the day with 70 miles. The century goal wasn't realistic when combined with 10 miles of quad cooking hill repeats.

I decided to try a short, easy "recovery ride" Sunday, which was one of dumber ideas.

I was exhausted, and a recent bout of posterior vitreous detachment (not quite as bad as a detached retina) has obscured some of my peripheral vision. I didn't notice a car approaching too fast from my right until it was on top of me. I still had time to unclip and set a foot down at the intersection break in the median strip. But my leg spasmed and I couldn't unclip. Felt like there was a bit of grit in the cleats, which were new and didn't pop out as easily as the worn cleats I just replaced. I didn't want to flop down in the path of the car, so I swerved sharply left and hugged the left side of the lane, hoping the car would miss me. Fortunately there was no other traffic so the driver slowed, moved over and tweedled the horn impatiently. Not even a real honk, just a miffed tweedle sound.

My only reaction was "Sweet looking Mustang! Look at those rims that just avoided flattening me!" I was too tired to even get excited or scared. I was just grateful it didn't turn out worse. I did a very slow and easy 15 miles, headed home and slept for 24 hours. And cleaned out the cleats before the next ride.

First time I've nearly been clobbered that was completely my fault. Gave me a little different perspective on things. I should have stayed home and taken a recovery nap.

But the Saturday ride was great.


Nice car. Would have been a shame to mess up the paint with my blood.


Realistic sunset bike lean photo after 40 miles including 10 miles of hill repeats.
That second pic looks really hot......physically anyway. Stepping in one of those this time of year is like a sauna.
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Old 08-07-20, 11:01 AM
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I got a new lid!

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Old 08-07-20, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by texaspandj
My wife's'86 has one. It seems it would just be regular size for Ironman. 68x113.
They're good enough, no fuss no bother.
Good to know. That's one of the sizes I got from REI.

Or I might just ditch the caged bearings in the Suntour BB and see if it makes any difference. Supposedly it reduces friction slightly. I've avoided that when I overhauled the BB mostly because it takes a really stiff grease to hold the loose bearings in place or reassembly becomes a huge PITA. And I might try some Shimano grease rather than Phil's, which appears to be marine grease. Not bad stuff but it seems to lack the initial stiffness to hold bearings in place when I've used it on hubs.
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Old 08-07-20, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by seypat
That second pic looks really hot......physically anyway. Stepping in one of those this time of year is like a sauna.
Yeah, the heat has been brutal lately. I've been riding in midday or late afternoon sun, deliberately, partly to get heat adapted so I'm stronger during early morning and nighttime rides.

And partly because I need the sunlight to kick start my body into making vitamin D to improve my bone density. My thyroid failure messed up my endocrine system and bone density so I have osteopenia -- not quite osteoporosis yet but my docs are concerned. I've been riding without sunscreen for a couple of years and, surprisingly, don't burn easily anymore. For some odd reason, cutting back on sugar and losing weight seem to have improved my resistance to sunburn. When I was 50 lbs overweight I burned easily but not now. Supposedly sunlight improves the body's ability to make nitric oxide for energy. Seems to help lower my BP too.

But I have to take it really easy. I monitor my heart rate while riding in summer midday sun and ease back whenever it exceeds 150 bmp. That means some hot days I'm piddle pedaling around 12 mph.
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Old 08-07-20, 05:30 PM
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For sure it's been hot!
Since "The Ride' has been cancelled I've changed my workout schedule back to original. That means Mon and Wed running 30 minutes on treadmill, then 9 rounds of workout I could run outside but my wife is cycling indoors so I try to keep her company. Tue and Thu I bike 18- 26 miles. Saturday hour run and Sunday long bike . Friday are my off days.
But I think I talked my buddy into doing a century on Sat Aug 29th. I'm doing it for the challenge, fun and RobbieTunes .
So far the plan is the 56 mile half Ironman course then out 22 and back...but it could change to another route.
canklecat you're welcomed to join and or anyone else is welcomed too.
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Old 08-07-20, 07:53 PM
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Originally Posted by canklecat
Good to know. That's one of the sizes I got from REI.

Or I might just ditch the caged bearings in the Suntour BB and see if it makes any difference. Supposedly it reduces friction slightly. I've avoided that when I overhauled the BB mostly because it takes a really stiff grease to hold the loose bearings in place or reassembly becomes a huge PITA. And I might try some Shimano grease rather than Phil's, which appears to be marine grease. Not bad stuff but it seems to lack the initial stiffness to hold bearings in place when I've used it on hubs.
I use heavy duty bearing grease from an auto parts store. Definitely stiff enough for holding during assembly.
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Old 08-07-20, 08:02 PM
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Not such a big deal:
Bearings with lube in DS cup, frame on side, thread in from bottom. Hand tighten only
Insert spindle and dust cover.
Assemble NDS cup and balls.
Move frame to vertical and insert & hand tighten NDS cup.
Replace frame into work stand and tighten/adjust DS cup then NDS cup as needed.

Phil is the best, based on my testing. It’s all I use.
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Old 08-07-20, 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by canklecat
Good to know. That's one of the sizes I got from REI.

Or I might just ditch the caged bearings in the Suntour BB and see if it makes any difference. Supposedly it reduces friction slightly. I've avoided that when I overhauled the BB mostly because it takes a really stiff grease to hold the loose bearings in place or reassembly becomes a huge PITA. And I might try some Shimano grease rather than Phil's, which appears to be marine grease. Not bad stuff but it seems to lack the initial stiffness to hold bearings in place when I've used it on hubs.
I've changed the caged to loose before and I'm sure there's a difference BUT I'm not able to detect it.
I've never used phils grease however the blue marine grease and white lithium grease holds the bearings good enough for them to stay put.
Speaking of which, I'm repeating myself here but I've changed from marine grease to lithium grease because I noticed that old original installed shimano and campagnolo BB came with that type of textured grease. But again I've not been able to detect a difference. The peanut butter texture of lithium grease vs the jelly texture of marine grease...who did it better?
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Old 08-10-20, 09:48 AM
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Back in the '80s when dept store mountain bikes were a thing, you could easily identify them by there bolt on wheels and thick unicrown forks. I think the unicrown forks are one of the knocks against the later Ironman bikes...at least for me it was. Good thing we still have the earlier Ironman. I think to this day I still have bad feelings for dept store bikes. BUT I gotta tell ya, after working on and having to test ride the ones I've worked on they are a Hoot! Just fun to ride. Harder then heck to dial in but so much fun to ride. When I get on one of my Ironman my mindset goes to " this is a training ride, time to get faster or lose weight or get healthier or better". I mean it's fun but it's a bit more serious or purposeful. But when I ride a WM bike it's pure FUN. I can't explain it but to say it's like when I was 11 years old and riding everyday and everywhere with my friend Daryl. I don't think I'm a bike snob but I do know what a quality bike is but I think I'll have more respect for those WM bikes now.
Which brings me to the reason for this post...I'm gonna build me a WM special bike. My neighbor gave me a rusty crusty bike and I'm gonna do it. I'm hoping it's made in Japan.
I've actually overhauled my other neighbors Japanese made dept store bike from 35 years ago. He said he bought it for his wife when they were first married. He said she used to ride it alot til the kids came. She's riding again! Those Japan bikes are better than the Taiwan or China made ones by far.
​​​​​​Try it you might like it.

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Old 08-10-20, 06:09 PM
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Yeah, I remember that earlier discussion about grease characteristics. While I've used Phil's for years, something about it seems less buttery and cohesive than Shimano hub factory grease.

With Phil's, when I hold a finished wheel by the axle between my hands and spin it, subjectively, it feels like the grease quickly liquefies and there's a slight metallic feeling in the rotation.

With a Shimano hub and factory grease (assuming good condition), it feels buttery and cohesive. I think this is referred to as shearing characteristics in grease.

Probably makes little or no difference in actual friction, since some racers decades ago would substitute oil for grease in hubs and cranks when racing.

I'm not sure whether Shimano has ever identified its grease by type, to make it easier to find a cost effective comparable grease. It is pricey stuff.

On the plus side, Phil's does seem to last forever and resists infiltration of water and debris. I had a partial tube of Phil's left over from the 1970s and it was as good as new. Some older traditional greases, notably stuff used by West Germany in almost everything, tended to dry out and form a substance like brittle plastic or crumbling rubber.
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Old 08-13-20, 04:00 PM
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Im working a bit on my 1986 (Grey) Ironman and wondered if anyone had a suggestion for replacement brake hoods to fit the Shimano 600 lever set that is on there currently? A good fitting set of no name replacement hoods is fine for my purposes. Thanks in advance!



Last edited by orcas island; 08-13-20 at 05:06 PM.
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Old 08-13-20, 04:05 PM
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Those are Aero Gran Compes, not Shimano 600. My '86 is equipped the same way. I **THINK** the reason is, Shimano didn't have aero 600 levers until late '86 into '87, so they opted for the AGCs. Whatever reason, that's what you want to base your search on.
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Old 08-13-20, 04:07 PM
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Ahh. I just began to wonder if perhaps these weren’t the original equipment on the bike... Thanks!
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Old 08-13-20, 04:22 PM
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Here is the bike itself: kind of ratty, but will clean up to a point. I’m going to need to find a tutorial on the Shimano 600 SIS shifting system. The rear derailleur shift lever doesn’t seem to want to stay engaged when downshifting; cable tension is correct, rear limit screws are adjusted correctly. It seems the problem is in the lever itself?

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Old 08-13-20, 04:56 PM
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It does sound like a shifter issue. Does it decisively "click" in each position? Like, loud enough that the downtube goes "tingk"?

If you're accustomed to friction downtube levers, the attachment is a little different on the rear shifter. The folding loop thingy is actually the friction/index selector. Yours is in the index position, according to your first photo. Turn it about 90 degrees counter-clockwise, and it goes into friction. To tighten the lever, you use the slot-head screw in the middle.
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