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I think I have too many bikes - what to do?

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I think I have too many bikes - what to do?

Old 12-17-11, 12:28 PM
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rookgirl
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I think I have too many bikes - what to do? - More help needed please!

Update - I need some more help, please! details in post 58

Yes. I've said it. I know most of you have more than me, but what is frustrating me right now is that NONE of them are totally reliable! They all have their issues - 3 of them with steel rim/wet braking problems. I am really hopeless at riding my Bianchi road bike, and can't seem to fix (or have fixed) my winter mtn bike. So I am at an impasse.

I am just about ready to sell the fleet and use the proceeds to buy a Pashley or something.

My next thought is to get a new alloy wheelset for my Raleigh Superbe and just *ride* it. Even in the winter? Right now, it's hardly ridden because I am too scared something will happen to it, which is just silly, I know. I don't want it to get stolen.

Should I sell a couple, get my new wheelset and ride the Superbe and throw caution to the wind?

Last edited by rookgirl; 12-30-11 at 06:59 PM.
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Old 12-17-11, 12:35 PM
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The Raleigh Superbe w/ KoolStop salmon brake pads and aluminum rims would be a good winter bike /beater.

What's wrong w/ your Bianchi road bike? (I am kind of biased -- see signature.)
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Old 12-17-11, 12:59 PM
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There's nothing really wrong the the Bianchi except that I am terrible at riding it. I've never really ridden a road bike and I just can't get used to the "twitchy" front end. I can't let go of the handlebars for long enough to shift gears! It's also a little short in the top tube for my short leg/long torso combination.

I suppose I could also turn the Bianchi into a city bike (taaaaall stem, upright bars) but geez, it would look ugly! Ironically, the Bianchi is my cheapest bike by far. Also, there is not much fender clearance and braze ons, of course

Last edited by rookgirl; 12-17-11 at 01:19 PM.
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Old 12-17-11, 01:22 PM
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There is no need for a Pashley if you own a Superbe... new alloy rims and Kool Stops will address the braking issue and if you only have to deal with wet, as opposed to freezing temperatures, it is a bicycle that was designed to be ridden every day for about one hundred years.

Rims will run about $35.00 each and that much again if you did a lace over to swap rims, and if you go with a full rebuild you could add another $35.00 per wheel for some premium quality spokes. I have no issue with lace overs on otherwise sound wheels.

The old roadster is probably pretty low on the list of bikes thieves will look at and one just needs to use a quality lock and proper locking strategy and the Superbe should stay put wherever you park it.
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Old 12-17-11, 01:31 PM
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sell them and get something you like.
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Old 12-17-11, 01:33 PM
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Unfortunately I do have to deal with freezing temperatures and actually rode for the first time ever in snow last night (rode there and back to a night out in heels, dress, and wool cape on my ugly mtn bike with issues!). I'm in SW Ontario, so we have a significant amount of snow and it is often wet, gross and sticky.

The salt factor certainly does concern me, but if I did do the conversion, would my Superbe rust away into nothing?
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Old 12-17-11, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by illwafer View Post
sell them and get something you like.

Yep, keep your favorite...sell the others and get one that works and that you LOVE to ride
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Old 12-17-11, 01:41 PM
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It sounds like the Bianchi should just go: it doesn't fit your body or your riding style. Quite likely a bike that fit you better would be easier handling.

From all reports, changing out the Raleigh's rims to alloy would make a huge difference, but I didn't get that far with ours. And maybe it's a bit too nice for winter riding anyway, so that problem can be put aside for now.

You already have a mtn bike for winter riding...what problems are you having with it? For that purpose we have kept just one of the several Specialized Hardrocks that I've fixed up over the last few years. Actually this 'keeper' came in very good shape, with new 1.5" tires. It's an aluminum 'AX' model, and aside from my son riding it on a salty, slushy street last winter and not cleaning it afterward, so the chain rusted badly, it's been pretty impervious. That one cost just $70, which was a steal, but Hardrocks are ubiquitous and durable. I don't think anyone is likely to ride that one much this winter; if so I would likely turn it into a SS, just to keep things simple and rustable parts to a minimum.
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Old 12-17-11, 01:57 PM
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The mtn bike has an issue which I can't solve - something slips when I start from a stop after backpedaling to get the pedal into the correct position. I can't recreate it at the shop and he cna't get it to do it, yet it happen every time i try and start from a standing stop (at a traffic light, fro example). Although practical and ugly (i don't care about wrecking it), it's just not working! I'd also prefer a more upright position, but I don't want to spend any real money on it (for a taller stem, for example). I don't think it's worth spending any money on to convert it to SS.
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Old 12-17-11, 02:11 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
Unfortunately I do have to deal with freezing temperatures and actually rode for the first time ever in snow last night (rode there and back to a night out in heels, dress, and wool cape on my ugly mtn bike with issues!). I'm in SW Ontario, so we have a significant amount of snow and it is often wet, gross and sticky.

The salt factor certainly does concern me, but if I did do the conversion, would my Superbe rust away into nothing?
The conversion to nicer rims is worth it if you plan to spend any time riding the Superbe and going with Kool Stop (continental model) would be a good place to start to see how much the braking improves as you might find this to be sufficient.

If you want to save your beloved Superbe from the horrors of winter I would look for a winter bike that fits you well and that you don't mind subjecting to some uglier weather that will also handle studded tyres to make icy riding more of a non issue.

Sounds like the mtb and the Bianchi are not great fits for you and winter is too crappy to ride a bike that does not make you happy.
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Old 12-17-11, 02:46 PM
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I would vote you sell a couple and invest the money into a wheelset for the Superbe and getting the mountain bike fixed / more suited to your needs.

I'm actually having similar thoughts (about very different bicycles) and I'm considering selling nearly all of my bikes except my Planet X and my MX Leader and buying a nice, new 29er and upgrading my IF with 11 speed Campy. Leaving me with 1 road bike, 1 cross bike, 1 mountain bike. Blasphemy!

(Of course I'll need to keep 1 lock up city bike commuter, and a back up road bike and I can't bring myself to sell my Sports...ugh you see it will never happen!)
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Old 12-17-11, 02:50 PM
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I'm wondering if I should just convert the Superbe and ride it, regardless of the weather, to at least use it and not have it sit. And if it dies in a few years then so be it.

Is this so evil?
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Old 12-17-11, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
I'm wondering if I should just convert the Superbe and ride it, regardless of the weather, to at least use it and not have it sit. And if it dies in a few years then so be it.

Is this so evil?
Invest in some 'framesaver' or something similar and hose the bike down once a week or something if it gets salty. It will last you many more years even if you ride it in the winter slop.

Ride what feels good and makes you happy, you only live once and the bike (even though a classic) is only a bike.
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Old 12-17-11, 04:58 PM
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What would you suggest using for framesaver?
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Old 12-17-11, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
What would you suggest using for framesaver?
I would suggest Boeshield T-9. (I use it as chain lube as well, and since I've completely given up trying to keep my winter ride clean (a MTB with PB fenders & Nokians) I just slobber a little extra on portions of the frame most likely to rust.)

For the Bianchi I'd get a longer stem. 20 or 30mm more can make a huge difference (as it can in the seat post if the saddle to bar drop is really what is causing the issue).

Regarding "something slips" when starting out, worn cogs are one possible cause. It happens to me every time I hammer down with just slight wear, and so I have replaced more FWs (and chains) than I care to remember.

I would preserve that Superbe for nice summer evening rides if I were you. JMHO.
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Old 12-17-11, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
What would you suggest using for framesaver?
There's the stuff that's actually called "Frame Saver":
http://www.amazon.com/Weigles-bicycl.../dp/B0012GO58Y

I'd think it would probably stay in place a little better than things intended more for lubrication. I agree with others that your Superbe should last for very many years if you take a bit of care to rinse off any salt residues periodically. Also keep an eye on any places where the paint is getting chipped and apply some touchup as needed.

If the wheels are otherwise in good shape I agree with Sixty Fiver that a replacement of the rims while reusing the hubs and spokes would be the most cost-effective. But it would require that you choose a replacement rim with about the same ERD (eff. rim diameter) so the spokes will be the right length. And it might be hard to find someone willing to do the wheel build that way (some are understandably reluctant to reuse spokes when they have no way of knowing their history).
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Old 12-17-11, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by auchencrow View Post
I would suggest Boeshield T-9. (I use it as chain lube as well, and since I've completely given up trying to keep my winter ride clean (a MTB with PB fenders & Nokians) I just slobber a little extra on portions of the frame most likely to rust.)

For the Bianchi I'd get a longer stem. 20 or 30mm more can make a huge difference (as it can in the seat post if the saddle to bar drop is really what is causing the issue).

Regarding "something slips" when starting out, worn cogs are one possible cause. It happens to me every time I hammer down with just slight wear, and so I have replaced more FWs (and chains) than I care to remember.

I would preserve that Superbe for nice summer evening rides if I were you. JMHO.
Thanks for this!

The "something slips" issue seems only to occur if I have backpedalled (i.e. to put the pedals in a good position). LBS guy was totally standing on the pedals with the brakes on and reefing and it didn't slip! There's not much wear on the cogs. The chain is only worn laterally, apparently. It's a mystery...
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Old 12-17-11, 06:56 PM
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Check to see if the derailleur is bent or out of alignment. A misalignmen like that can cause a chain to partially derail and thus slip when initial pressure is applied. Also, the chain ring could have worn or bent teeth or be un- true, laterally speaking
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Old 12-17-11, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
Thanks for this!

The "something slips" issue seems only to occur if I have backpedalled (i.e. to put the pedals in a good position). LBS guy was totally standing on the pedals with the brakes on and reefing and it didn't slip! There's not much wear on the cogs. The chain is only worn laterally, apparently. It's a mystery...
Is this in winter only ?

I had a issue with an older MTB that would slip. What was happening (around -10 C) was the springloaded teeth that engage the freehub boody would stick in the unengages place (the rachet mechanism). We solved the problem by not riding that bike in winter. Another way would have been new back hub (or just the body if you can find one that is cost effective) as rebuilding them is really not that much fun.
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Old 12-17-11, 07:50 PM
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My guess that the "something slips" problem is a stiff link. Have you taken the chain off recently. Sometimes the link that is used to join the chain together get very stiff and needs some flexing with a pliers to get to flex again.
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Old 12-17-11, 08:01 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
The mtn bike has an issue which I can't solve - something slips when I start from a stop after backpedaling to get the pedal into the correct position. I can't recreate it at the shop and he cna't get it to do it, yet it happen every time i try and start from a standing stop (at a traffic light, fro example). Although practical and ugly (i don't care about wrecking it), it's just not working! I'd also prefer a more upright position, but I don't want to spend any real money on it (for a taller stem, for example). I don't think it's worth spending any money on to convert it to SS.
The above reads like one or a combination of:

Worn chain and or worn cogs(s)
Worn jockey wheel pulleys
Misaligned derailleur, hangar tab bent.
Worn out derailleur, pivots w/ too much slop
Stiff link, the chain has to be tested for ease of movement with no tension, a gloved hand job.

I had a skip on one bike I just diagnosed, different wheel set revealed that it was a bent hangar tab. When I backpedaled at a stoplight to set up the cranks to restart quickly the chain would come slightly off the upper jockey wheel, start off and I felt a jump.

I recently got another bike that shifted poorly, jockey wheels and the chain had to go, too bad- it was a nice looking Regina Record Oro unit... lateral wear was the killer, length was good, almost factory.

Mtb's get the kind of use / abuse that often kills driveline parts fast.

I had a girlfriend long ago who rode to my house with heels and a little black dress... grand memories.
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Old 12-17-11, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
Thanks for this!

The "something slips" issue seems only to occur if I have backpedalled (i.e. to put the pedals in a good position). LBS guy was totally standing on the pedals with the brakes on and reefing and it didn't slip! There's not much wear on the cogs. The chain is only worn laterally, apparently. It's a mystery...
Seconding what elcraft said...

If it is not skipping under load and the chain and cassette wear is within limits this may speak to a minor derailleur alignment issue as you say it happens when you back pedal which may be causing a minor derailment. When you take off the chain finds its place and this is where you get that skip.

If the bicycle has an indexed drive you can check by pedaling backwards and seeing what the chain does... if everything is set up properly and is straight the backpedaling should be smooth and the chain should track properly.

With a friction shifting system you are responsible to make sure the derailleur is properly positioned and then you can test things in the same manner.
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Old 12-17-11, 08:45 PM
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Originally Posted by rookgirl View Post
Yes. I've said it. I know most of you have more than me, but what is frustrating me right now is that NONE of them are totally reliable! They all have their issues - 3 of them with steel rim/wet braking problems. I am really hopeless at riding my Bianchi road bike, and can't seem to fix (or have fixed) my winter mtn bike. So I am at an impasse.

I am just about ready to sell the fleet and use the proceeds to buy a Pashley or something.

My next thought is to get a new alloy wheelset for my Raleigh Superbe and just *ride* it. Even in the winter? Right now, it's hardly ridden because I am too scared something will happen to it, which is just silly, I know. I don't want it to get stolen.

Should I sell a couple, get my new wheelset and ride the Superbe and throw caution to the wind?
Do you still have that Nishiki Mixte? That was a perfect city bike. I would imagine that that would be the one to put some alloy wheels on. A cheaper used set of 700c, some slightly bigger tires. That would be the winter bike, leaving the raliegh for fair weather jaunts. I seem to remember that the Raliegh is a really nice looking bike. And for the record, you could abuse and neglect it while riding it daily and it will outlast most new bikes.

I read the post about the Mountain bike, first I would suggest a different bike shop, if someone looks at something and cannot fix it or help move on. Have someone watch the wheel as you take off. They may see something.

It took me a long time before I was satisfied with what I wanted compared to what I needed in a bike, so be patient. I am still tweaking the fleet after a lot of years.
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Old 12-17-11, 08:53 PM
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Thanks all. I will check it out in the morning.

I do still have the Nishiki Mixte, which is definitely a great bike, except for the braking problems.
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Old 12-17-11, 09:07 PM
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Ooops, sorry - I hit post before I meant to (trying to post in between hockey periods!)

Thank you for all the help on teh mtn bike issue. I will look at it carefully tomorrow. The new suggestions seem to make sense as it didn't seem to be more obvious things (simple wear, for example).

One of the reasons I was thinking of the Raleigh as a possible daily/winter rider was the more upright position. I work as a musician in an orchestra, so I don't like to have too much pressure on my wrists when riding to work.

The Nishiki also has an issue other than the rims - it has a positron shifter which does scare me somewhat as I have heard that they tend to break. I love the indexing on the mtn bike and the SA hub (well not indexed in the same way, but you know what I mean). If I wanted to replace the rims on the Nishiki mixte, would I just switch the freewheel over so that it remains indexed? Could I then buy a pre-built wheel and just have it trued (I am guessing this is a cheaper option)?

Maybe I need two new wheelsets...one for the Raleigh and one for the nishiki!
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