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Fat and supple 26" (559mm BSD) road tires?

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Fat and supple 26" (559mm BSD) road tires?

Old 12-18-11, 09:24 PM
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Fat and supple 26" (559mm BSD) road tires?

I'm mostly done building up a well-abused MB-2 frameset as an all-arounder with drop bars and STI levers. I'd like to put some decent tires on it instead of cast-iron-sidewall commuter "MTB slicks."

I'd like fat, supple, fast-rolling road tires for the ISO 559 size, in that Grand Bois Hetre / Challenge Parigi-Roubaix sense. It's looking like the two best options are the non-Tourguard Paselas in either 1.5" or 1.75" or Big Apples in the biggest size the frame will hold.

What other supple road tires are out there in 559mm size?
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Old 12-18-11, 09:30 PM
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I'd like to know, too. Aren't the Big Apples heavy?
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Old 12-18-11, 09:31 PM
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Not cheap but the Compass 26x1.75 is probably the best:

http://www.compasscycle.com/Tires.html

Also not as supple but wider is the Schwalbe Kojak 26x2.0:

http://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_ti...ad_tires/kojak
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Old 12-18-11, 09:31 PM
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I don't necessarily think of the TG Paselas as particularly supple, myself. They look good on C&V bikes and are pretty good "all arounders" but they are a pretty far cry from Grand Bois Hetres. I haven't ridden the Challenge Paris-Roubaix tires, so I can't comment about them.
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Old 12-18-11, 09:53 PM
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Big Apples. They are a little heavy, but their comfort, speed, and puncture protection make up for it. They are truly great tires.
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Old 12-18-11, 10:11 PM
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You want fast-rolling...that'll mean no tread. Supple ride needs large air volume...1.9-2.0" tire. I have a pair of rebadged Bell road tires that are basically baldies, and light as heck. I'll return with a model name and possibly the OEM model later.
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Old 12-18-11, 10:13 PM
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Originally Posted by AZORCH View Post
I don't necessarily think of the TG Paselas as particularly supple, myself... I haven't ridden the Challenge Paris-Roubaix tires, so I can't comment about them.
NON-TourGuard. :-)

I have the Parigi-Roubaixs on my Atala and I love them. They're very fast and cushy.

Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Aren't the Big Apples heavy?
Originally Posted by jag410 View Post
They are a little heavy, but their comfort, speed...
This is what I've heard about them. I seem to recall that Veloria swooned over that cadillac feeling; and our good friend Snarkypup thought they were the bee's knees.

I'll have to check out those Compass tires!
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Old 12-18-11, 11:57 PM
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I have a pair of 26x1.75" non-TG Paselas in the "tire closet" right now. Won't be installing them until the spring, but the sidewalls feel nice and thin, the tread area flexible. Can't wait to put them on!

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Old 12-19-11, 12:06 AM
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I rock Continental Town and Country 2.1's on my commuter/folder. I regularly do 20 mile rides on them on a fairly heavy fendered commuter bike when I skip the train on the way home. They are light for what they are, flat free until they're ready for replacement after a year or so when stuff finally works its way through (I ride some rough urban jungle poor neighborhood/ ex industrial area stuff), and comfortable.



The angled shot seems to emphasize the tread. The center strip is slick-- they don't make any road noise really. And the sidewalls are pretty thin, so rolling resistance is pretty good.
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Old 12-19-11, 12:29 AM
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I just started a forum in regards to a tire I could put on a touring bike built from a steel mtn bike from the late 80's. It has some relevant information.
http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-x-2-quot-Tire
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Old 12-19-11, 03:41 PM
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Those Compass tires sound great: "the same tread and casing as Grand Bois." But, the more I look at them, the more they look like rebranded folding 26x1.75 Pasela TourGuards.

Notice that the tread in the picture looks identical to the tread on the Paselas (and not at all like any of the Grand Bois treads). Also, the weight is specified at 440g which is identical to the specified weight of the folding-bead 26x1.75 Pasela TourGuard.

I know someone with an old Schwinn cruiser with lots of Campy Pista parts and either Big Apples or Fat Franks. I'll have to see if I can negotiate a ride on it, which will make the decision between the Big Apples and the Non-TG Paselas.

Shame about those Compass tires. Has anybody actually seen them in person / can anyone confirm that they are different from Paselas in spite of appearances?

Last edited by MrEss; 12-19-11 at 03:56 PM.
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Old 12-19-11, 03:47 PM
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If they're using the same casing as the other Grand Bois tire offerings its much higher TPI than a Pasela despite what the tire may look like.
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Old 12-19-11, 05:47 PM
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The Conti RaceKing Supersonics are deceptively fast, despite having some tread. Two of my three course records on the Midnight Century were on the 2.2" RK SS, which measure out at an honest 55mm casing width (the third was on Schwalbe Furious Freds). The RKSS casings are insanely supple and have a plush ride, it's like a high-end road tire sized in 2.0" and 2.2" widths. Also extraordinarily lightweight for their size, 440-470 grams.

Can you hear the tread at full 22mph+ cruise speed? Yeah. Is it actually slowing you down? Not as much as you think Note that the Supersonic has nothing in common (beyond superficial tread design) with the other flavors of the RK, being German-made, with Black Chili rubber, and larger for their rated size than the others.

Conti also has other models in the Supersonic option, look around. Some, like the Speed King, have minimal tread if you're opposed to the amount on the RK.

Year 1 (yes, those are candy bars taped to the top tube):


Year 2:

Last edited by mechBgon; 12-19-11 at 06:51 PM.
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Old 12-19-11, 06:59 PM
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Originally Posted by MrEss View Post
Those Compass tires sound great: "the same tread and casing as Grand Bois." But, the more I look at them, the more they look like rebranded folding 26x1.75 Pasela TourGuards.

Notice that the tread in the picture looks identical to the tread on the Paselas (and not at all like any of the Grand Bois treads). Also, the weight is specified at 440g which is identical to the specified weight of the folding-bead 26x1.75 Pasela TourGuard.

I know someone with an old Schwinn cruiser with lots of Campy Pista parts and either Big Apples or Fat Franks. I'll have to see if I can negotiate a ride on it, which will make the decision between the Big Apples and the Non-TG Paselas.

Shame about those Compass tires. Has anybody actually seen them in person / can anyone confirm that they are different from Paselas in spite of appearances?
Here is something Jan Heine says about the Compass 26" x 1.75" tire:

Panaracer makes the Compass tires for us. (They also make Grand Bois tires.) Panaracer’s Pasela uses the same mold, but the Compass tire uses a different casing construction. The result is lower rolling resistance and a more comfortable ride. The tread rubber is different, too, offering better grip. Finally, the tread may be a little thinner, while still offering long life. The Compass tires use a folding Kevlar bead.

While the Pasela is a budget tire that offers very good performance for the money, the Compass is a high-end tire optimized for performance and comfort.
You can check out his product page on those tires here http://janheine.wordpress.com/2011/0...-in-26-x-1-75/
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Old 12-19-11, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by RJM View Post
Here is something Jan Heine says about the Compass 26" x 1.75" tire:
Interesting... there is much more info here than on the official Compass Cycles website.

I wrote Jan to ask about the whole "it weighs exactly as much as a Pasela Tourguard" question. In light of this new info, I'm guessing the specs were just copied off the pasela tourguard, and the tires really are better.

EDIT: Jan responded to my email with what I suppose probably feels like a canned response by now (RJM's quote which answered most of my questions made me feel foolish for emailing). The tires sound like they should be really nice.

Now I just have to decide if I should take the plunge right away, or get some non-TG Paselas to have decent, OK tires to ride until I'm 100% sure it's a keeper. (All the other bikes we have or can imagine having around the house are on 700c wheels, so if the MB-2 went the tires would go with it.)

Last edited by MrEss; 12-20-11 at 12:02 AM.
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Old 09-21-12, 03:47 PM
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Bumping this thread...

Interested in knowing what the OP ended up purchasing.

ThermionicScott: Did you mount the Paselas last spring. Did they prove as fast as you thought they were going to be?

Has anyone any experience with the Compass tires?

The contenders are (they must be > 1.5" to fit my rims):

1. Panaracer Pasela either 1.5" or 1.75"
2. Compass 1.75"
3. Vittoria Randonneur Pro 1.5"
4. Schwalbe Marathon Racer 1.75"

Any feedback is greatly appreciated.
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Old 09-21-12, 04:27 PM
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Hey, Chris! I've put just over 1600 miles on mine and I pimp them every chance I get. There may be faster and lighter tires out there, but these are plenty zippy for me (yet comfortable at the 35psi front/40psi rear that I use.)
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Old 09-21-12, 04:35 PM
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I run big apples at 25-30 psi and it's like riding on a magic carpet. Weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
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Old 09-21-12, 07:50 PM
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The next set of 26" tires I buy will be Resist Nomads. I've got a pair of them in 700x35 on my Voyageur, and they're pretty nice for the low price. I've been meaning to swap them out for an equal-size set of Paselas for comparison, but I doubt I'll enjoy them as much as the Nomads (based on my recollection of the last time I used the Paselas.) The 26" Nomad is available with a nice tan sidewall.
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Old 09-21-12, 08:43 PM
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I was sorely tempted by the Compass 26x1.75 tires. But in the end sensibility won out and I ordered the 26x.1.5" tanwall non-TourGuard Paselas from Harris Cyclery.

I'm very happy with them. They're cushier than the 30mm Challenge tires on my bike, but give a similar "rolling forever" feeling at about 45PSI front, 60PSI rear. The MB-2 rides and handles like a road bike with them. The bike's owner has put a couple hundred miles on them; no flats and the first beginnings of barely-detectable wear on the rear.

The Pasela tread makes a unique sound while you're riding, especially up above 25MPH or so. Has anyone else noticed this?

I'd recommend them to anybody. If you're loaded, though, I'd recommend trying the Compass tires -- I bet they're even sweeter.
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Old 09-22-12, 03:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris_in_Miami View Post
The next set of 26" tires I buy will be Resist Nomads. I've got a pair of them in 700x35 on my Voyageur, and they're pretty nice for the low price. I've been meaning to swap them out for an equal-size set of Paselas for comparison, but I doubt I'll enjoy them as much as the Nomads (based on my recollection of the last time I used the Paselas.) The 26" Nomad is available with a nice tan sidewall.
Those seemed really promising. Too bad they're only available at 2.25". They are definitely porky. I doubt the will fit with my fenders.
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Old 09-22-12, 04:10 AM
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The contenders are (they must be > 1.5" to fit my rims):

1. Panaracer Pasela either 1.5" or 1.75"
2. Compass 1.75"
3. Schwalbe Marathon Racer 1.75"
I forgot to add something important. I'm interested in running a set of one these tires TUBELESS with a set of Mavic UST rims and Stans sealant. Any ideas which 26" tire might be more suitable? I eliminated the Vittoria Rando Pro 1.5" fearing they might not give a good seal with these rims.
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Old 09-22-12, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris Pringle View Post
I forgot to add something important. I'm interested in running a set of one these tires TUBELESS with a set of Mavic UST rims and Stans sealant. Any ideas which 26" tire might be more suitable? I eliminated the Vittoria Rando Pro 1.5" fearing they might not give a good seal with these rims.
If you're going to run tubeless with UST rims, you really should either use a UST tire or use one of Stan's rubber rims strips in the UST rim along with a "standard" tire and sealant. For the application of a relatively fat tire to be used primarily on pavement, tubeless isn't a viable option, IMO. For fatter tires (mostly applicable to the mountain bike world), the idea with tubeless is to be able to run crazy-low pressures for better traction and control when riding off road, and not having to worry about pinch flats. The sealant also takes care of all but the worst punctures. When I say "crazy-low" pressures, I'm talking about pressures well under 40 psi, often in the 20's. For road applications on road bikes, there are tubeless-ready tires on the market that allow you to run regular road tire pressures tubeless and with sealant. But for these applications, it's the tires that are key: they are made specifically to be run without tubes at high pressures.

There really isn't anything, nothing that's officially recommended at least, that allows for a relatively fat tire (designed primarily for pavement) to be run at pavement-appropriate pressures without inner tubes. I'm not saying that someone's not doing it, because they probably are, but with fatter tires running tubeless, the max pressure is generally recommended to be about 40 psi when running without tubes. The tubeless advantage really isn't there for this application (pavement riding on relatively fat tires).

Last edited by well biked; 09-22-12 at 09:04 AM.
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Old 09-22-12, 09:40 AM
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I just ordered 2 Pasela non-Tourguards in 26 X 1.75 from Bikeworld through Amazon for $21.95 each for my MB-2. In my experience, the non-Tourgards are more compliant and I like the price. I bought the last two, but Niagra also has them on Amazon.
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Old 09-22-12, 02:04 PM
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Interesting, well biked, I would have thought fatter tires would be a more realistic proposition than skinny tires for road tubeless. My buddy used 700x45 Specialized Borough XCs on Stans Notubes rims to great success on roads and trails. He wasn't running stupid-low pressures, though. I would think that high-pressure tires would be the toughest nut to crack.
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