Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Peugeot rescued from trash..is this anything?

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Peugeot rescued from trash..is this anything?

Old 12-21-11, 03:44 PM
  #1  
cranky old dude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 4,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Peugeot rescued from trash..is this anything?

I am guessing from the serial# stamped on the underside if the BB (and very difficult to read), and from what I suspect is a date stamp on the front hub that this is approximately a 1984 Peugeot. The decal scheme also appears ro be 1984 -1987ish. I have been unable to determine what model it is though I expect it's low end entry level stuff.

Any clues as to what I have here?

Below is the information I was able to find stamped on the bike and components along with some pictures, without doing any dis-assembly.

Peugeot

Serial #………. Underside of BB……………………………B412 17675

Frame # (?)….. Paper under tape, left chainstay…………4001765 PHLE1054

Stem…………. ……………………………………………..CTA

Bar…………… (embossed) La Bonneville ITON-27190.....CTA

Brakes……….. Side pull……………………………………. Weinmann Type 500

Brake levers ….. ………………………………………………. Shimano 105

Cranks………. ………………………………………………. Nervar

Hubs………… Found possible date on hub (84)………. Maillard
Rear labeled "Helico Matic"

Fork & Frame....Approx 53 cm. BB center to top of seat tube....Carbolite 103

Front DR ……………………………………….……….Sachs Huret

Rear DR ……………………………………………….Shimano

Friction shifters ……………………………………..……….Sachs Huret

Dropouts…… with screw adjusters………………………. Simplex

Tires………….. ……………………………………………….Michelin 28 x 650

Skewers……. ……………………………………………….Spidel



















Thanks in advance for your input. I'm trying to decide whether or not to bring this little balck bike back to life.
cranky old dude is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 03:51 PM
  #2  
that_guy_zach
Senior Member
 
that_guy_zach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: omicron persei 8
Posts: 808
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Its a decent bike. Not the best but it would make a nice bike for someone. Looks like a simple and inexpensive, but labor heavy project to get back on the road.
that_guy_zach is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 03:51 PM
  #3  
20grit
Curmudgeon in Training
 
20grit's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Rural Retreat, VA
Posts: 1,957

Bikes: 1974 Gazelle Champion Mondial, 2010 Cannondale Trail SL, 1988 Peugeot Nice, 1992ish Stumpjumper Comp,1990's Schwinn Moab

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
HLE was a lower range tubeset.

You do have a Shimano Golden Arrow derailleur on there (probably a late addition). Those fetch a decent penny on ebay.

At best it's a lower mid level machine. I'd guess more higher entry level. Don't have catalogs to locate models, but that's my take on it.
20grit is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 03:52 PM
  #4  
lostarchitect 
incazzare.
 
lostarchitect's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 6,890

Bikes: See sig

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
It was free? Nothing special, but heck yes, bring it back to life! It doesn't look all that bad.
__________________
1964 JRJ (Bob Jackson), 1973 Wes Mason, 1974 Raleigh Gran Sport, 1986 Schwinn High Sierra, 2000ish Colian (Colin Laing), 2011 Dick Chafe, 2013 Velo Orange Pass Hunter
lostarchitect is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 04:05 PM
  #5  
Oldpeddaller
Senior Member
 
Oldpeddaller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Maidstone, Kent, England
Posts: 2,628

Bikes: 1970 Holdsworth Mistral, Vitus 979, Colnago Primavera, Corratec Hydracarbon, Massi MegaTeam, 1935 Claud Butler Super Velo, Carrera Virtuoso, Viner, 1953 Claud Butler Silver Jubilee, 1954 Holdsworth Typhoon, 1966 Claud Butler Olympic Road, 1982 Claud

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Are the forks bent - or is it just my eyesight?

Nice lower level 1984 Peugeot. I like those Carbolite 103 frames - not fantastically light but not "boat anchors" either, they give a very smooth ride. It's arguably in better condition than the very similar "Peugeot Esprit" I'm restoring at present - the frame's the same, even the colour scheme but mine's got Rigida steel rims, the same front changer, brakes & shifters and Sachs alloy cranks with steel chain rings. In the UK Peugeots were sold with model names, not numbers. Yours looks to be a better model in the range than mine. Sorry no photos yet, it's in pieces in my garage (buried behind a ton of displaced household items displaced to make more space indoors at Christmas, courtesy of my good lady wife). I've got some new alloy rims and stainless spokes to rebuild my wheels, yours look as though they will polish up well instead. My Esprit has a Shimano rear mech as well, but only a Tourney - and I'd guess that both rear mechs are replacements. I'd definitely put the effort in to restore your bike, it really only needs stripping down, cleaning, adjusting and lubing (assuming I'm wrong about the fork) and it'll make a fun ride for someone.
Oldpeddaller is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 04:05 PM
  #6  
auchencrow
Senior Member
 
auchencrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Detroit
Posts: 10,327
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think it is an 86/7 PHLE10 like the label says!
(Usually these paper labels are missing)

It is a worthy project because those internally brazed pug's were very good rides, despite being lower-mid level.

In my experience, these bikes are reasonably light and the HLE tubing is pretty decent tubing. Here is what the 87 Peugeot catalog says about HLE steel:


“HLE is Peugeot’s exclusive alloy tubing. It is a “micro alloyed steel” which is composed of Manganese, Nobelium, Aluminum, Carbon and Titanium, which offers a lighter, yet stronger frame. These4 elements are commonly used in the manufacture of aeronautical steel. The introduction of these elements results in a steel with dramatically improved mechanical properties when compared to conventional steel.

The strength to weight ratio of HLE steel is superior to that of conventional tubing. Using this tubing enables Peugeot to save more than 7 ounces in the weight of the frame. The HLE tubing, when used with our patented internal brazing system, gives Peugeot a frame which is at the top of its class in performance and reliability.”



PS the fork is likely a older replacement.
__________________
- Auchen

Last edited by auchencrow; 12-21-11 at 04:09 PM.
auchencrow is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 04:10 PM
  #7  
Oldpeddaller
Senior Member
 
Oldpeddaller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Maidstone, Kent, England
Posts: 2,628

Bikes: 1970 Holdsworth Mistral, Vitus 979, Colnago Primavera, Corratec Hydracarbon, Massi MegaTeam, 1935 Claud Butler Super Velo, Carrera Virtuoso, Viner, 1953 Claud Butler Silver Jubilee, 1954 Holdsworth Typhoon, 1966 Claud Butler Olympic Road, 1982 Claud

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by auchencrow View Post
I think it is an 86/7 PHLE10 like the label says!
(Usually these paper labels are missing)

It is a worthy project because those internally brazed pug's were very good rides, despite being lower-mid level.

In my experience, these bikes are reasonably light and the HLE tubing is pretty decent tubing. Here is what the 87 Peugeot catalog says about HLE steel:


“HLE is Peugeot’s exclusive alloy tubing. It is a “micro alloyed steel” which is composed of Manganese, Nobelium, Aluminum, Carbon and Titanium, which offers a lighter, yet stronger frame. These4 elements are commonly used in the manufacture of aeronautical steel. The introduction of these elements results in a steel with dramatically improved mechanical properties when compared to conventional steel.

The strength to weight ratio of HLE steel is superior to that of conventional tubing. Using this tubing enables Peugeot to save more than 7 ounces in the weight of the frame. The HLE tubing, when used with our patented internal brazing system, gives Peugeot a frame which is at the top of its class in performance and reliability.”
Auchen, is this the same tubing as the Peugeot "Carbolite 103"? This frame is identical to my "103's" (I've got two of them but both in huge sizes), even down to the internally brazed joints.
Oldpeddaller is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 04:30 PM
  #8  
Stealthammer
Still spinnin'.....
 
Stealthammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Whitestown, IN
Posts: 1,208

Bikes: Fisher Opie freeride/urban assault MTB, Redline Monocog 29er MTB, Serrota T-Max Commuter, Klein Rascal SS, Salsa Campion Road bike, Pake Rum Runner FG/SS Road bike, Cannondale Synapse Road bike, Santana Arriva Road Tandem, and others....

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My guess is it is a 1984 PH10LE that retailed for $280-320 when new. A good (but not great) find, but if you part it out and clean all of the parts up really well, I'll bet you could make nearly that much back out of it. Congratulations!



http://www.flickr.com/photos/cobrabyte/2921479195/

http://cyclespeugeot.com/images/1985...ications_1.jpg

Last edited by Stealthammer; 12-21-11 at 04:56 PM.
Stealthammer is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 04:46 PM
  #9  
auchencrow
Senior Member
 
auchencrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Detroit
Posts: 10,327
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Oldpeddaller View Post
Auchen, is this the same tubing as the Peugeot "Carbolite 103"? This frame is identical to my "103's" (I've got two of them but both in huge sizes), even down to the internally brazed joints.
The 7 oz weight savings cited in the Peugeot catalog is probably as-compared-to what came before (which in this case was typically Carbolite 103).

I'll put a caveat on that by saying I don't think anyone knows exactly what went into Carbolite 103 - so I can't say it is categorically any different, but I can tell you that my HLE Corbier (a rung or two below the OP's bike) feels a lot lighter than a U08!
__________________
- Auchen
auchencrow is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 04:54 PM
  #10  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 22,018

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 41 Times in 36 Posts
+1 Bent fork. Very fixable. Bike will take a lot of work, so depending on your interest, you could probably sell as is in the $25 to $50 to someone else that will do the work, or do the work yourself.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 05:01 PM
  #11  
cranky old dude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 4,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So the label contains the model name?

I measured roughly 21+" from the BB center to the top of the seat tube...or 54cm.

Does that mean this label indicates a PHLE 10 (or PH10 LE) size 54cm.?



I'm wondering what the realtionship is between the embossed serial number on the BB bottom and the very similar number on the paper label. (B412 17675 vs. 4001765)

The Fork...yeah, I noticed that too. I think I'll try bringing the bike back to life. If I'm successful, then I'll look for someone to bend it back (or not).
cranky old dude is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 05:14 PM
  #12  
auchencrow
Senior Member
 
auchencrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Detroit
Posts: 10,327
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cranky old dude View Post
So the label contains the model name?...
+1
__________________
- Auchen
auchencrow is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 05:31 PM
  #13  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 22,018

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 67 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 654 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 41 Times in 36 Posts
1986 PH10LE: Came with Carbolite 103 fork and Huret derailleurs and shift levers. So I think that is what you have. I've got a twin to that bike (black 1986PH10LE, 54cm), it also came with a bent fork...

Correction, black is a 1985 color, so I guess both of ours are black (although the catalogs show the 1985 to have an HLE fork, while the 1986 has a Carbolite 103 fork)).

Last edited by wrk101; 12-21-11 at 06:21 PM.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 05:45 PM
  #14  
Chombi 
Senior Member
 
Chombi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 11,139

Bikes: 1986 Alan Record Carbonio, 1985 Vitus Plus Carbone 7, 1984 Peugeot PSV, 1972 Line Seeker, 1986(est.) Medici Aerodynamic (Project), 1985(est.) Peugeot PY10FC

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Aside from the bent fork, if the frame is not bent or buckled in any way from the incident, all I see that needs to be fixed/done might really be not too much. Frankly, if I'm reading the pics right, the bike looks to have done very little miles when it might have had the bent fork related mishap and maybe put away in a garage for 20+ years where it accumulated all that dust, and very superficial looking rust
Have a good bike shop look at that fork to see if they can fix it by cold setting. The rest would be rotine tune up, lubrication, replacement of perishables (tires, tubes, and maybe cables and brake pads plus a good cleaning.

Chombi
Chombi is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 06:00 PM
  #15  
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Posts: 17,418
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It's a great bike for the price you paid.
Grand Bois is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 06:07 PM
  #16  
c3hamby
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 216
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
That leaf in the wheel is hard to find on any bike, entry to high end. When they get brown like that they get real crunchy but that's how you can tell it's been there awhile.

Most likely if you take it off it will crumble.
c3hamby is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 06:08 PM
  #17  
Stealthammer
Still spinnin'.....
 
Stealthammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Whitestown, IN
Posts: 1,208

Bikes: Fisher Opie freeride/urban assault MTB, Redline Monocog 29er MTB, Serrota T-Max Commuter, Klein Rascal SS, Salsa Campion Road bike, Pake Rum Runner FG/SS Road bike, Cannondale Synapse Road bike, Santana Arriva Road Tandem, and others....

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cranky old dude View Post
.......I'm wondering what the realtionship is between the embossed serial number on the BB bottom and the very similar number on the paper label........ (B412 17675 vs. 4001765)

From what I understand, B412 17675 is the serial number that was stamped into the frame when it was built, and it identifies when the frame was built (XYMM) as well as the specific frame serial number within that production run. The X412 on your frame indicates that the frame was built in December of 1984. The 17675 indicates the specific frame serial number for that production run. The paper label was placed on the chainstay or bottom bracket when the bike was actually assembled and it is "associated" with the frame's serial number but was actually used for inventory tracking.

Since each of these frames could end up as any one of several models the "B" probably indicates the specific size or frame configuration, but no one seems to know for sure.

Last edited by Stealthammer; 12-21-11 at 06:16 PM.
Stealthammer is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 07:50 PM
  #18  
cranky old dude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 4,259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Stealthammer View Post
From what I understand, B412 17675 is the serial number that was stamped into the frame when it was built, and it identifies when the frame was built (XYMM) as well as the specific frame serial number within that production run. The X412 on your frame indicates that the frame was built in December of 1984. The 17675 indicates the specific frame serial number for that production run. The paper label was placed on the chainstay or bottom bracket when the bike was actually assembled and it is "associated" with the frame's serial number but was actually used for inventory tracking.

Since each of these frames could end up as any one of several models the "B" probably indicates the specific size or frame configuration, but no one seems to know for sure.
December 1984. That combined with the '85 Spec Sheet that you posted the link to is the kind of enlightenment I was searching for.

Thank you all for sharing your knowledge and insights.

The bike is a tad bit small for me but I'm going to get it back to 'Road worthy' status and then offer it up to my daughters. I think I already know which one will want it. When she leaves with it she'll have a fact sheet including the info learned from this thread.

I'll try to remember to post the results here.
cranky old dude is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 08:28 PM
  #19  
Poguemahone
Vello Kombi, baby
 
Poguemahone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Je suis ici
Posts: 5,328

Bikes: 1973 Eisentraut; 1970s Richard Sachs; 1978 Alfio Bonnano; 1967 Peugeot PX10

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 80 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It is a darn nice trash find. I'd pull it apart, it's likely worth more as parts. The frame isn't worth much, aside from the fork damage it looks like there is a nice kickstand crimp on the rear stay.
__________________
"It's always darkest right before it goes completely black"

Waste your money! Buy my comic book!
Poguemahone is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 11:17 PM
  #20  
bigbossman 
Dolce far niente
 
bigbossman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Northern CA
Posts: 10,832
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Oldpeddaller View Post
Are the forks bent - or is it just my eyesight?
I doubt it is bent - it is impossible to tell from that photo, but small cameras with wide focal lenses usually induce error into the photo that makes it look like the fork is bent. It's a pretty commonly occurring optical error, but that doesn't seem to stifle the "fork is bent" chorus almost every time a bike picture is introduced here.

The only way to tell is by in-person inspection, unless the fork is VERY obviously wrecked. This one is not obvious, so my money would be on "not bent".

Low end though it may be, because it is a small frame it would have value (around here, anyway) after a complete overhaul. At the very least, strip it down to bare frame/fork/headset, buff out the paint with Scratch-X or something similar, and pop it up on eBay. My guess is that you might get $150 just for the frame-set, if it shines up nicely and presents well in photographs.
__________________
"Love is not the dying moan of a distant violin, it’s the triumphant twang of a bedspring."

S. J. Perelman

Last edited by bigbossman; 12-21-11 at 11:21 PM.
bigbossman is offline  
Old 12-21-11, 11:24 PM
  #21  
Stealthammer
Still spinnin'.....
 
Stealthammer's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Whitestown, IN
Posts: 1,208

Bikes: Fisher Opie freeride/urban assault MTB, Redline Monocog 29er MTB, Serrota T-Max Commuter, Klein Rascal SS, Salsa Campion Road bike, Pake Rum Runner FG/SS Road bike, Cannondale Synapse Road bike, Santana Arriva Road Tandem, and others....

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bigbossman View Post
I doubt it is bent - it is impossible to tell from that photo, but small cameras with wide focal lenses usually induce error into the photo that makes it look like the fork is bent. It's a pretty commonly occurring optical error, but that doesn't seem to stifle the "fork is bent" chorus almost every time a bike picture is introduced here.

The only way to tell is by in-person inspection, unless the fork is VERY obviously wrecked. This one is not obvious, so my money would be on "not bent".
I have to agree. I bought several hands full of PX10s from the same era back in the late 80s and most of them needed a slight bit of "tweaking" to get them truely straight, but the forks were seldom the problem. From the photos I would guess that if the fork is bent, that it can't be out by more than 0.5-1.0mm at most, and even then it would have to be laterally. No paint cracking, no tubing wrinkling, spacing between the front tire and the downtube looks ok.... but the front wheel is offset slightly in the fork. My guess is that the alignment issue might be as simple as front wheel fit or dish.

Last edited by Stealthammer; 12-21-11 at 11:32 PM.
Stealthammer is offline  
Old 12-22-11, 05:00 AM
  #22  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 14,208

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 807 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
So for zero money you got a frame with thinner-wall steel tubing, all-aluminum components, and only one item of crash damage (the fork, but please check the frame for any signs of collapse at or near the TT/HT and DT/HT junctions!). Needs a lot of time - have to rebuild all the bearings, and whatever else is supposed to move and might not do it so good. But with that frame it should become a good bike, and some of the parts might be worth something (rear mech, maybe the brakes, Maillard hubs and matching freewheel. Spidel skewer sets are not easy to find any more, with all the little plastic bits still intact.

What's to complain about? If you don't like this one, walk the other way when you see a dumpster. It could have been a Vista or a Columbia.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 12-22-11, 05:06 AM
  #23  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 14,208

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 807 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
BTW, this HLE tubing is unique to Peugeot, and they were uniquely capable among bike companies. They were vertically integrated, in that they made the steel, rolled the tubes, made the lugs, built the frames, and assembled the bikes. Kind of like a car company, which they were, as well. Back before the UO-8 they were experimenting with tubing refinements, and I believe the usually surprising ride of a UO-8 is the result, and the light weight that results if you weenie the bike. Unlike a Vista or Columbia.

A true cheapskate could have a lot of fun with this bike.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 12-22-11, 05:11 AM
  #24  
Road Fan
Senior Member
 
Road Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 14,208

Bikes: 1980 Masi, 1984 Mondonico, 1984 Trek 610, 1980 Woodrup Giro, 2005 Mondonico Futura Leggera ELOS, 1967 PX10E, 1971 Peugeot UO-8

Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 807 Post(s)
Liked 11 Times in 10 Posts
Originally Posted by bigbossman View Post
I doubt it is bent - it is impossible to tell from that photo, but small cameras with wide focal lenses usually induce error into the photo that makes it look like the fork is bent. It's a pretty commonly occurring optical error, but that doesn't seem to stifle the "fork is bent" chorus almost every time a bike picture is introduced here.

The only way to tell is by in-person inspection, unless the fork is VERY obviously wrecked. This one is not obvious, so my money would be on "not bent".

Low end though it may be, because it is a small frame it would have value (around here, anyway) after a complete overhaul. At the very least, strip it down to bare frame/fork/headset, buff out the paint with Scratch-X or something similar, and pop it up on eBay. My guess is that you might get $150 just for the frame-set, if it shines up nicely and presents well in photographs.
I'd go for a rider rather than a flipper, but ...

I agree, it's really hard to tell what's going on with that fork. The photo is not directly side on from the fork, and the lighting is rather low - it's hard to see if it's the shape of one fork blade or two. Aside from potential lens distortions.
Road Fan is offline  
Old 12-22-11, 07:55 AM
  #25  
Miyata110
Senior Member
 
Miyata110's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 330

Bikes: 1986 Miyata 110

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
PM me if you decide not to rehab it as I'd be happy to take it off your hands.
Miyata110 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.