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1977 5 speed Carlton Corsa can i change to a 7 speed freewheel? HELP!

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1977 5 speed Carlton Corsa can i change to a 7 speed freewheel? HELP!

Old 01-04-12, 04:20 AM
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1977 5 speed Carlton Corsa can i change to a 7 speed freewheel? HELP!

Hi every one one, i have a 5 speed 1977 Carlton Corsa, witch i have stripped down to restore, and is away for a respray, Iwould like to know can i change my freewheel from 5 speed to 7 speed using my original huret rear derailleur?
or could i even be able to use the Simano mega range 7 speed free wheel?
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Old 01-04-12, 05:08 AM
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Maybe.

Do a search on frame spreading or "cold setting". The spread between the dropouts on your frame was designed around 120mm. You will need to spread this to 126. You might be able to fudge a little with the axles spacers and such but at the very least you need the chain to have a little room between the smallest sprocket and the right dropout.

Your rear derailleur will have to be up to finer shifting. I put a 6 speed freewheel in place of a 5 and I found that the shifting got more touchy. It was harder to get the chain to run quietly in a couple of gears. I think 7 in place of 5 will give problems.

You might try it without spreading (just yank the stays far enough apart to get the axle in once, rather than permanent deformation) and see if you like the shifting characteristics.

David
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Old 01-04-12, 05:14 AM
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An easy upgrade would be a Suntour "ultra six" cassette. It's only 6 speeds but it is narrow and should fit in place of your current freewheel without modification.

You could also respace your frame to 126 and fit either a normal 6 speed or a Suntour ultra 7 freewheel. That will require reworking your rear hub a bit.
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Old 01-04-12, 09:44 AM
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You'll need to switch the rear hub axle for a wider one and respace the locknut width too.
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Old 01-10-12, 04:48 AM
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Thanks for the replys, am still unsure, i have a atom 5 speed freewheel from a 76 continental witch is in good condtion, but i also have a spare 40/50 teeth chain wheel, i could convert the bike into a 10 speed i,ll just need to sorce a a huret front mech and twin shifters ill wait and see, then post pics after the bike comes back from the resprayers.
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Old 01-10-12, 06:34 AM
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In "Updating" my 79 Schwinn LeTour, I went to 700s and am running a 7 speed hub with no problems, just had to tug the stays a bit to pop the "NEW" one in place, the Shimano 400FF RD has no problem with it, though I do have to adjust the FD more as I go up and down the gears. I did have to add a couple washers on the axle to get a little space for the chain.
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Old 01-10-12, 12:36 PM
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One thing I can add is to buy an 8spd index chain. The thinner chain will help with shifting and won't be as touchy for centering on a gear when you are riding.
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Old 01-10-12, 12:53 PM
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Originally Posted by mkeller234
An easy upgrade would be a Suntour "ultra six" cassette. It's only 6 speeds but it is narrow and should fit in place of your current freewheel without modification.

You could also respace your frame to 126 and fit either a normal 6 speed or a Suntour ultra 7 freewheel. That will require reworking your rear hub a bit.
I recently upgraded a Panasonic Dx3000 from a 6 speed freewheel to a 7-speed cassette - mostly for the learning experience and because I had most of the parts. It worked out OK, after a lot of re-spacing and a few parts not playing well together (how come a 7 speed Shimano cassette fits slightly loose on a Shimano 7-speed freehub, requiring a .5mm spacer? Go figure.)

I like the smoother shifting from the modern cassette but think I prefer working with freewheels - no need to replace the hub. In the future, I'd like to replace the stock 5 speed freewheels on other 70's bikes with a modern ramped freewheel. Does anybody make such a thing, like a Suntour Ultra 6 that takes up the same space as an ol' skool 5 speed freewheel? Or an ultra 7 width ramped freewheel that will fit in a 126 dropout spacing?

Thanks,
-J
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Old 01-16-12, 08:41 AM
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What I see in the shops is the SunRace 5 and 6 speed freewheel, mostly the 6. I went in to buy one a few months back and the shopkeeper said "reuse your old one if you possibly can. The new ones are sh**". The old one had a broken tooth so I had to buy a new one.

Sure enough, after a month or so the new freewheel was loose and clicked around as I peddled. It wasn't that hard to get apart and I found that there was a thin shim for bearing preload. Removing the shim/spacer made the bearing feel just about right, so keep this in mind if you run across it.

It did seem like the tooth profile was fairly modern and the spacing was a little narrower than the old 5 speed dimensions, so a 6 SunRace on an older bike should be no problem. A 7 speed might work with the right washers, but you may end up needing a longer axle, as mentioned above.

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Old 01-16-12, 10:03 PM
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WHat kind of Huret? My Jubilee is working with my 7 speed but it won't take a real high tooth count on the big cog. I think it's a 28. I did have to sort of spread the frame a bit but I didn't cold set it.
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Old 01-17-12, 04:37 AM
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Originally Posted by 55 Traveler
Maybe.

Do a search on frame spreading or "cold setting". The spread between the dropouts on your frame was designed around 120mm. You will need to spread this to 126. You might be able to fudge a little with the axles spacers and such but at the very least you need the chain to have a little room between the smallest sprocket and the right dropout.

Your rear derailleur will have to be up to finer shifting. I put a 6 speed freewheel in place of a 5 and I found that the shifting got more touchy. It was harder to get the chain to run quietly in a couple of gears. I think 7 in place of 5 will give problems.

You might try it without spreading (just yank the stays far enough apart to get the axle in once, rather than permanent deformation) and see if you like the shifting characteristics.

David
It always seems to me that this "more touchy" shifting is due to the spacing between sprockets being less with an ultra-6 (the one that is meant to go on a 120 mm hub) versus a standard 6 (same spacing as a 5-speed). The narrower spacing means it needs a lot less derailleur bias for the next set of teeth to start grabbing the chain. If I'm right, you need a 7-speed chain on your bike when you go from a 5-speed to an ultra-6.
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Old 01-17-12, 07:26 AM
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Check your drop outs.

120mm=5 speed
126mm=6 speed
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Old 01-23-12, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Road Fan
It always seems to me that this "more touchy" shifting is due to the spacing between sprockets being less with an ultra-6 (the one that is meant to go on a 120 mm hub) versus a standard 6 (same spacing as a 5-speed). The narrower spacing means it needs a lot less derailleur bias for the next set of teeth to start grabbing the chain. If I'm right, you need a 7-speed chain on your bike when you go from a 5-speed to an ultra-6.
I'm sure you are correct that the narrower span between sprockets in a 6 (or7) speed freewheel means less movement on the shifter before it starts to shift. The narrower chain may give a little more tolerance of setting (I haven't tried that so can't say for sure), but even then you are requiring finer settings and will need to take a little more care in shifting.

David
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Old 01-23-12, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by mkeller234
An easy upgrade would be a Suntour "ultra six" cassette. It's only 6 speeds but it is narrow and should fit in place of your current freewheel without modification.

You could also respace your frame to 126 and fit either a normal 6 speed or a Suntour ultra 7 freewheel. That will require reworking your rear hub a bit.
Actually, any road 7 speed will fit in 126 spacing. (There are mountain bike 7 speeds that are designed for something wider- 130 or something like that.) I dropped a "modern" (ramped) SunRace road freewheel into my Raleigh Super Course, replacing the 6 speed straight tooth freewheel, and it works great.

If you're going to cold set the frame, do it BEFORE painting to make sure you don't crack the new paint (it probably won't, but why take the chance?)
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