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1985 Trek 760 : My first road bike!

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1985 Trek 760 : My first road bike!

Old 04-18-12, 11:27 PM
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Originally Posted by peazweag
Nice trek ! Just ride the crap out of it.


Originally Posted by rsacilotto
+1 on getting the rust fixed, I have an '83 760, just painted it last year, still a terrific bike. Before and after pix are here
Your Trek looks so clean! Great job!

Originally Posted by Chrome Molly
I would hesitate to get new wheels for it until you do some more research on compatibility. It appears that the wheelset you currently have is for a 7 speed freewheel (it appears it's a 7 speed shimano 13-28 freewheel on there now), and the wheels you're looking into are for cassettes. When you upgrade the wheels, you might want to add brifters and go all out on upgrading it to 8 or 9 speed. Until you get to know it by riding it, you really won't be able to tell if it's worth the investment (the frame probably is, but how it fits you is important to get comfortable with before spending money on upgrading it).
Originally Posted by rekmeyata
I would not recommend changing that bike over to a cassette system from the original freewheel. The cost for the components would be expensive, plus you have to spread the stays and if that's done incorrectly you can crack the frame. A 7 speed freewheel is more then enough gears, geez I use to race cat 3 and raced in mountains and never had anything more then a 6 speed cluster (12 speeds total). I still at age 58 don't have more then 14 speeds except on the main touring bike which has 18 and my mountain bikes that have 24.
I did some reading on the differences between cassette and freewheel and I finally see both of your points. It's not worth it for me--I like the DT shifters and the hubs on it right now. It'd be too much work or money to get something else.

Originally Posted by lotek
I repainted my '84 770 last year. I too had a rust issue around the cable guides but that was because the previous owner
used it on a trainer for a few years. I didn't have much problem deciding to repaint as he also started to strip the paint
when he sold it.
Great riding bike (same frame as the 760 only difference were components), fast but not twitchy. I've always thought those
old treks were way undervalued and gave the italian frames a run for their money.
Really cool that you bought from Skip, couldn't think of a nicer guy to buy from, or one knowledgeable about steel treks.

Marty
Thanks for the comments!

I'm still waiting on the yellow saddle to arrive so that I can get the bike to look like the 1985 Trek catalog, but in the meantime I've replaced the clipless pedals with some VO touring pedals and their half clips. I have been riding on the clipcless pedals with my tennis shoes haha .



I don't know how well you guys can see this but I got a picture of the driver's side chainstay damage



There's a minor gouge/indent there but I'm not sure how bad it is to the frame. Skip said it might have been from a snapped chain?
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Old 04-19-12, 12:02 AM
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The marred chain stay is extremely common. Sometimes the chain hangs on the teeth (I guess?) and gets wedged between the chain ring and the chain stay. You're probably okay as long as it's not a deep gouge. It looks pretty typical in the picture. I think almost every bike I've owned had the same scratch/gouge. It looks like some rust is forming under the paint there, though, and I'd probably be more concerned about that.

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Old 04-19-12, 02:08 AM
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If the derailleur is adjusted properly that stay damage should never occur; just imagine how much damage would have been done if that chain issue would have occurred on a carbon fiber bike. MTB's and touring bikes (due to the bail or climb out gear) have this issue more then road bikes, but obviously it happens to road bikes as well.

There is a device called a Chain Keeper and other names; but here's what one type looks like: https://www.amazon.com/N-Gear-Chain-G...4822655&sr=8-4 This device prevents the chain from jumping off the last ring gear and marring the stay.
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Old 04-19-12, 05:59 AM
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Was a semi-rare bike when new. Try Testers model paint. Or an autoparts store touch up paint. The long downtube rip might be tough to pull off but it's a bike worth saving.
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Old 10-15-14, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by nuron



I don't know how well you guys can see this but I got a picture of the driver's side chainstay damage



There's a minor gouge/indent there but I'm not sure how bad it is to the frame. Skip said it might have been from a snapped chain?
I wanted to bring this thread back to comment on @nuron issue with the stay gouging. It has been my experience with Trek racers that when you really stomp on it coming out of the "hole" the frame flexes and the teeth of the inner chainring will have contact as shown. My 460 did this. I was ticked off at the ignorance of people in traffic and when clear I jumped on it hard. Later at a rest stop I noticed fresh contact on the chainstay. I had this remedied by shimming out the chainset at the BB a few mm's. No more contact. These Treks have gorgeous, well-advanced frames of the era but were also known as being whippy or "noodly" as some have said. Great bikes, love my recently acquired '86 760!
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Old 10-15-14, 05:34 AM
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[QUOTE=OldsCOOL;17218091]I wanted to bring this thread back to comment on @nuron issue with the stay gouging.

Glad you brought this one back. I've got the same bike as the OP and was wondering how the bike turned out. I've got a few scratches I wouldn't mind touching up. I love my 760. The thing is just the most fun to ride.
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Old 10-15-14, 06:03 AM
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I too, wonder how the OP's bike turned out.

That's a great bike to just bump into for your first bike. What does suck about it is- you've started at the top- it doesn't get much of any better than that for an American made racing frame.
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Old 10-15-14, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy
I too, wonder how the OP's bike turned out.

That's a great bike to just bump into for your first bike. What does suck about it is- you've started at the top- it doesn't get much of any better than that for an American made racing frame.
Yeah, it's a good problem to have. Good thing there's so many great Japanese and European bikes out there. Of course, they're not as cheap and plentiful as old Treks are in our corner of the Midwest. We're pretty lucky in that regard.
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Old 10-15-14, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by The Golden Boy
I too, wonder how the OP's bike turned out.

That's a great bike to just bump into for your first bike. What does suck about it is- you've started at the top- it doesn't get much of any better than that for an American made racing frame.
Yup, ever in search of that fabled 170. I started with the 460, an entry level racer and for 10yrs dreamed of getting my hands on this beauty an '86 Pro Series 760. Kept this one in my sights for 2yrs until the lady wanted to sell it. It's in pristine condition, the paint only has one nick on the NDS from the top of the crank arm hitting the stay, opposite of the typical side. The bike has it's own mystique due to date, equippo, paint and pinstriping outlining the lugs.


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Old 10-15-14, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL
Yup, ever in search of that fabled 170. I started with the 460, an entry level racer and for 10yrs dreamed of getting my hands on this beauty an '86 Pro Series 760. Kept this one in my sights for 2yrs until the lady wanted to sell it. It's in pristine condition, the paint only has one nick on the NDS from the top of the crank arm hitting the stay, opposite of the typical side. The bike has it's own mystique due to date, equippo, paint and pinstriping outlining the lugs.

You probably would have liked that 53cm 170 Frameset that popped up in Seattle. Unfortunately the owner wasn't willing to ship.
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Old 10-15-14, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by upthywazzoo
You probably would have liked that 53cm 170 Frameset that popped up in Seattle. Unfortunately the owner wasn't willing to ship.
What did he ask for that beast?
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Old 10-15-14, 07:19 AM
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I believe it was $300-350, or thereabouts. I would have bought it for sure at that price--if it were 54cm! I honestly thought I'd go years without ever seeing a 170 on CL/Ebay. I was happy just to see one listed, even if not my size.
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Old 10-15-14, 07:48 AM
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I had one of those and liked it till I got my 88' Pinarello Montello,which was superior in every way.I'm a Vintage Trek fan(As my handle would attest to)but I was dissapointed with the feel and noodly quality of the 760.Mine was all Campy Victory.
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Old 10-15-14, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL
I wanted to bring this thread back to comment on @nuron issue with the stay gouging. It has been my experience with Trek racers that when you really stomp on it coming out of the "hole" the frame flexes and the teeth of the inner chainring will have contact as shown. My 460 did this. I was ticked off at the ignorance of people in traffic and when clear I jumped on it hard. Later at a rest stop I noticed fresh contact on the chainstay. I had this remedied by shimming out the chainset at the BB a few mm's. No more contact. These Treks have gorgeous, well-advanced frames of the era but were also known as being whippy or "noodly" as some have said. Great bikes, love my recently acquired '86 760!
I test rode a 760 and found that one to be a bit noodly though didn't get the bike do that damage, but then I test rode a 660 and it was quite a bit less noodly so I got that one which the LBS I bought the bike from agreed with the decision because I was racing and racing in mountains which he felt the lighter 760 would be too noodly for me. I race the 660 a lot and never got any chainstay damage.
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Old 10-15-14, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
I test rode a 760 and found that one to be a bit noodly though didn't get the bike do that damage, but then I test rode a 660 and it was quite a bit less noodly so I got that one which the LBS I bought the bike from agreed with the decision because I was racing and racing in mountains which he felt the lighter 760 would be too noodly for me. I race the 660 a lot and never got any chainstay damage.
I'm not feeling any whip/noodly flex with my 760 just yet but then I have yet to hammer it. Could it be the 52cm frame size being stouter than the taller sized frames? Who knows. The lighter frame set is definately quicker and livelier than my 460 TT1 frame was....and that was a lovely bike in it's own right.
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Old 10-15-14, 11:24 AM
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Originally Posted by upthywazzoo
I believe it was $300-350, or thereabouts. I would have bought it for sure at that price--if it were 54cm! I honestly thought I'd go years without ever seeing a 170 on CL/Ebay. I was happy just to see one listed, even if not my size.
Wow, I would have snapped at that price!
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Old 10-15-14, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL
I'm not feeling any whip/noodly flex with my 760 just yet but then I have yet to hammer it. Could it be the 52cm frame size being stouter than the taller sized frames? Who knows. The lighter frame set is definately quicker and livelier than my 460 TT1 frame was....and that was a lovely bike in it's own right.
I ride a 58 due to being 6 foot tall. A lot of racers back in day rode frames smaller than they would today because the smaller frame wouldn't feel as noodly and it was lighter. I chose to go with a frame more suited to my size because my previous bike was a 56 and I felt a bit cramped, so after test riding those two Treks (and a slew of other manufactures bikes) the 660 used a bit more stout frame with the 531cs tubeset that did weigh a bit more vs the 531p (in 1984) but since it wasn't rotational weight the extra 1/4th to 1/2 pound (depending on who you talk to!) wasn't a big deal and it made up for the extra weight by the much snappier response when hammered.

Side note, I still have the 660 but I bought that bike as frame and fork and then had all Suntour Superbe components on it. Since I was doing a lot of mountain riding and racing I needed a responsive frame, I also needed a rear derailleur that would shift fast while even climbing and the Superbe Tech derailleur the LBS sold me on did exactly that and shifted faster than any derailleur I went up against. The Tech derailleur was quite a bit heavier than the Superbe Pro by about 100 grams but again it wasn't rotational and the bang type of shift I got even while climbing made up for the weight I thought. Despite what reports said about that Tech derailleur having issues I never had one problem with it even after 160,000 miles!
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Old 10-15-14, 07:00 PM
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Ok, that makes sense. Must be pretty cool having the bike you raced with for all these years. I'm left with more mysteries than sureties on my 760. This is one I will keep.

I've not heard of the Suntour Tech derailleurs until now. Gotta love a strong, quick and positive shift, especially on climbs.
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Old 10-15-14, 08:02 PM
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I just picked up a 1987 560 Pro series frame yesterday. Not sure what I am going to do with it. I will build it up from my parts bin to see how she rides. I had a 86 ? 560 that was 501 Reynolds. It was a great bike. I sold it because I needed the cash and regretted it an hour later . I hope the 531 Reynolds is going to be good for me in the 24 inch frame? Any thoughts on the 87 560?
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Old 10-15-14, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by OldsCOOL
Ok, that makes sense. Must be pretty cool having the bike you raced with for all these years. I'm left with more mysteries than sureties on my 760. This is one I will keep.

I've not heard of the Suntour Tech derailleurs until now. Gotta love a strong, quick and positive shift, especially on climbs.
I'm glad I never wrecked serious enough to damage the bike...or especially me! The 660 today needs a paint job and new graphics because 20 years of the Southern California sun did a number on it. Someday I want to restore the paint and graphics, I know of a person that can do it and even make water applied paper graphics instead of the thicker vinyl others use, I'm hoping next summer to get it going but will have to wait to see, but my friend is 74 years old and he's not getting any younger and he's already had two strokes but can still function good, I would like to have it done sooner but that's just not possible right now, just hope nothing happens to him before I'm ready. He restores old 40's and 50's bikes and sells them for a lot of money, sold one recently for $25,000 after just a $1,200 investment. He use to restore cars but found he can make more money restoring those bikes and it's easier.
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Old 10-15-14, 08:19 PM
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Originally Posted by sss
The "nub" on the driveside seat stay is a chain hanger. You use it to hold the chain when you remove the rear wheel.
Cool beans! I learned something new today! I'd often wondered what that thing was for. Thanks.

On a related note, does anyone know where I might find a replacement "nub" for an '85 Nishiki? It has a hole or port on the drive-side stay, but no chain hanger attached to it.

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Old 10-15-14, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Steve Whitlatch
I just picked up a 1987 560 Pro series frame yesterday. Not sure what I am going to do with it. I will build it up from my parts bin to see how she rides. I had a 86 ? 560 that was 501 Reynolds. It was a great bike. I sold it because I needed the cash and regretted it an hour later . I hope the 531 Reynolds is going to be good for me in the 24 inch frame? Any thoughts on the 87 560?
that particular year of 560 was a good bike, it used the better 531 vs the 501 you had. Because the 560 was a lower end racing bike it used the standard 531 tubeset along with just cromoly stays and fork which was about a 1 pound heavier than the 84 660, but still a nice bike. A keeper if you ask me.

531 was a tad lighter than 501 by the way, the 501 was cromoly while the 531 is actually mangmoly though people often mistakenly call it cromoly. Also the 501 was made for low to mid end bikes and used seamed tubing whereas 531 was seamless and more expensive to make. I don't believe I've ever test rode a 501 from what I can recall, but I heard the 531 had a better quality ride.
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Old 10-15-14, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by rekmeyata
that particular year of 560 was a good bike, it used the better 531 vs the 501 you had. Because the 560 was a lower end racing bike it used the standard 531 tubeset along with just cromoly stays and fork which was about a 1 pound heavier than the 84 660, but still a nice bike. A keeper if you ask me.

531 was a tad lighter than 501 by the way, the 501 was cromoly while the 531 is actually mangmoly though people often mistakenly call it cromoly. Also the 501 was made for low to mid end bikes and used seamed tubing whereas 531 was seamless and more expensive to make. I don't believe I've ever test rode a 501 from what I can recall, but I heard the 531 had a better quality ride.
Well I can`t wait to get her built up. The 501 Reynolds Trek was a very nice ride. I really enjoyed that bike. If this one rides even better it will be a keeper. Thanks
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Old 10-15-14, 09:27 PM
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This is a pretty good comparison of 501 and 531:

Originally Posted by T-Mar
Reynolds 531 is a manganese-molybdenum (MnMo) steel, seamless tubeset that has been available since the 1930s in both plain and butted tubesets. The butted tubesets were avaible in several different wall thicknesses. Reynolds 501 was a chromium-molybdendum (CrMo) steel, seamed, butted tubest that made it's debut about 1983 and was available in two different thicknesses. Both tubesets have long been superceded by more advanced steel tubesets, but Reynolds still makes 531 to special order.

Reynolds used to tout manganese-molybdenum as superior to the chromium-molybdenum used by their major competitors, but eventually produced the 501 tubes using chromium-molybdenum. Both are very good steels.

The 531 sets were seamless, which is theoretically stronger, but is expensive to manufacturer, particularly for butted tubing with varying wall thickness. The 501 set was less expensive to produce because the the material was rolled to the varying wall thickness as a flat sheet, which was then fomed into a tube and welded along its length. While purists prefer the seamless tubes, I have yet to see a seamed, 501 tube fail and have no qualms about riding it.

Reynolds 531 was available in several wall thickness, but the baseline 531(c) tubeset had slightly thinner walls than the baseline 501 tubeset. As a result, the 531 tubeset was about 225g lighter.

In general, 501 was aimed at the mid-range market. Hence the slightly thicker and heavier tubes, seamed construction and in Reynolds' opinion, inferior CrMo steel. 531 was aimed at higher models, though it could be found on mid-range models by using plain gauge tubes or combining a 531 butted main triangle with lesser grade stays and/or forks,
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...1-v-531-a.html


Reynolds 501 was a good CroMo steel that would have been used in mid level bikes. The low level bikes would have been hi-ten and above that would be CroMo with hi-ten fork and stays.

Generally speaking, 200 and 300 level bikes were hi-ten, 400 level bikes were CrMo with hi-ten stays or manganese alloy with hi-ten fork and stays, 500 level bikes were generally CrMo frame, fork and stays, 600 level bikes were generally 531 frame with manganese alloy or CrMo fork and stays and 700 level bikes were 531/531.

Around 1986 531 was brought down to the 400 level main frame tubes.
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Old 10-15-14, 10:51 PM
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Hey guys, I still have the bike! I rode it for a year and let my brother ride it now since he got into bicycling. I was disheartened to find a small dent on the top tube but with all of its imperfections, it might as well get used. I've since picked up an early Trek 2500 with the carbon fiber main tubes. Still doesn't feel as nice as that 760 though...
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