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Hoods For "Safety" Levers

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Hoods For "Safety" Levers

Old 04-15-12, 10:39 AM
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Hoods For "Safety" Levers

Junior's "College Bike" is a 1990-ish Schwinn Sprint. It's got Weinmann safety levers on it- which he loves. However, he was asking about hoods for them. I can't think of seeing safety levers with hoods- are there such things?

My thought was to just send him a set of Dia Compe hoods I've got sitting around, punch holes in or cut as applicable and rubber cement down if they flop about.

Sound about right, or are there actually hoods for them?
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Old 04-15-12, 11:22 AM
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Some of the Dia Compe hoods had punch outs to incorporate the safety levers.
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Old 04-15-12, 11:47 AM
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Some of the Dia Compe hoods had punch outs to incorporate the safety levers.
I have a couple of Shimano sets and one set of Weinmanns, I believe. No pictures of the Weinmanns, but these Shimano units are available on Ebay, now and again, but the prices are going up all the time...

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Old 04-15-12, 06:41 PM
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shimano actually made a Exage series aero lever with safety levers. I wish I could find a pair that wasn't $80+
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Old 04-15-12, 06:44 PM
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Cane Creek hoods, available on line for under $10, plus an exacto knife. I've done it several times.
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Old 04-15-12, 07:49 PM
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This is somewhat off-topic, but if you converted to newer levers and added "cross levers" to the tops, they'd be more comfortable and functional.
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Old 04-15-12, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Cane Creek hoods, available on line for under $10, plus an exacto knife. I've done it several times.
This
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Old 04-16-12, 03:01 AM
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Getting the hoods to clear between the lever body and the safety lever is important to prevent friction between the two.
I put the washer on the protruding stud and cut around the washer instead of just around the stud. It is ncessary to have the stud pass thru the smaller hole first, so the hood lies flat on top of the larger-diameter washer while you trim around it with a sharp razor.
Some levers seem to require this more than others, I've seen some that worked okay with only the smaller hole for the stud, perhaps by deleting the washer? (wouldn't want to do that, the lever tip might slip off of the main brake lever's edge from the extra flex).
And BTW, the rubber on the CaneCreek hoods seems much thicker in places than original DiaCompe hoods.
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Old 04-16-12, 05:46 AM
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Originally Posted by dbakl View Post
Some of the Dia Compe hoods had punch outs to incorporate the safety levers.

The set I'm sending has the circle of the Dia Compe logo that looks like it could be a punch out.
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Old 04-16-12, 05:47 AM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
This is somewhat off-topic, but if you converted to newer levers and added "cross levers" to the tops, they'd be more comfortable and functional.
I suggested cross levers and he didn't like that idea.
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Old 05-08-12, 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by wrk101 View Post
Cane Creek hoods, available on line for under $10, plus an exacto knife. I've done it several times.
I don't suppose you have pictures? Any tips?
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Old 05-08-12, 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Getting the hoods to clear between the lever body and the safety lever is important to prevent friction between the two.
I put the washer on the protruding stud and cut around the washer instead of just around the stud. It is ncessary to have the stud pass thru the smaller hole first, so the hood lies flat on top of the larger-diameter washer while you trim around it with a sharp razor.
Some levers seem to require this more than others, I've seen some that worked okay with only the smaller hole for the stud, perhaps by deleting the washer? (wouldn't want to do that, the lever tip might slip off of the main brake lever's edge from the extra flex).
And BTW, the rubber on the CaneCreek hoods seems much thicker in places than original DiaCompe hoods.
How did you line them up to cut the holes? Any pics of finished product?
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Old 05-09-12, 01:07 AM
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Originally Posted by bounce View Post
How did you line them up to cut the holes? Any pics of finished product?
I mentioned putting the smaller hole over the stud, what I meant was to first put the washer over the stud, then put the hood on with the stud passing thru the original smaller hole in the hood, so the hood is aligned and lies flat when you carefully cut the bigger hole in the hood (around the washer) with a sharp, new razor blade.

The finished product is cosmetically perfect, you can't see the edges of the hole.
The washer is retained, preventing loose lever fit at the pivot, and the hood fully clears the moving safety lever.

I could take a picture if this is not clear, but showing only the completed installation. I does work flawlessly.

I also shorten (cut) the little spring in the hollow pivot shaft, the one that prevents the screw from loosening.
This allows the outer serrated washer to be deleted (it's useless) and lowers the profile of the protruding screw head a bit.
I also put LocTite on the screw threads, and lube the bushing and pivot bore in the safety lever with plastic-friendly GripShift grease.
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Old 05-14-12, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
I mentioned putting the smaller hole over the stud, what I meant was to first put the washer over the stud, then put the hood on with the stud passing thru the original smaller hole in the hood, so the hood is aligned and lies flat when you carefully cut the bigger hole in the hood (around the washer) with a sharp, new razor blade.

The finished product is cosmetically perfect, you can't see the edges of the hole.
The washer is retained, preventing loose lever fit at the pivot, and the hood fully clears the moving safety lever.

I could take a picture if this is not clear, but showing only the completed installation. I does work flawlessly.

I also shorten (cut) the little spring in the hollow pivot shaft, the one that prevents the screw from loosening.
This allows the outer serrated washer to be deleted (it's useless) and lowers the profile of the protruding screw head a bit.
I also put LocTite on the screw threads, and lube the bushing and pivot bore in the safety lever with plastic-friendly GripShift grease.
After I removed all the levers and pieces, I put the hood on the body, which covered the hole for the safety lever stud. I used that very stud (not my photo, but referring to this part: https://www.flickr.com/photos/strongl...n/photostream/) to create the hole in the rubber hood by applying a lot of pressure to twist and turn it into the rubber (cookie cutting it, basically). It worked and created a nice hole. I put the washer on the outside of the rubber. It sounds like from your description, I should cut a circle larger than the stud so that the washer has direct contact with the metal body of the brake. Let me know if that's the case.

Right now, I have a strip of cork tape under the hood too, per the normal way of wrapping bars. This is making the rubber bulge a little around the studs and the safety levers will brake but won't spring back to it's resting (unbraking) state.

Will cutting a larger hole for the washer, so that it can rest directly on the metal body, solve this problem?

Thanks for replying to this old thread!
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Old 05-14-12, 01:50 PM
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I think cutting a hole will work but can you send a few pics?
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Old 05-14-12, 08:16 PM
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Definitely, cutting a bigger hole around the washer is theway to go, so that the moving parts are constrained by all metal.

You just want to get the rubber out of the picture as far as getting the pivot to have a slop-free and flex-free hinge.

The tape under the hood could be an issue if there is still rubbing. If it's just the wrap-around piece then perhaps it could be shortened on the inboard sides of the lever body, just enough so that the lever clears the hood.

There's nothing "suicidal" about the safety levers on my bike, except that the front brake can easily put the rider over the bars with a hard squeeze of the lever. The pivoting action is smooth and solid with a free return action, and the tip of the safety lever doesn't even come close to threatening to slip off the top edge of the main lever under any circumstance.

On some bikes with safety levers, I will trim away a couple of millimeters from the lever body's front edge, which allows room for the safety lever's tip to restore full lever travel lost to the safety lever. There were even production levers with a notch cut at the front of the body to allow the levers to swing away from the bars to the full distance that existed before safety levers were fitted.
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Old 05-14-12, 09:47 PM
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Here are the pics. I've already put the cork tape on, so major changes could be challenging (for the handiwork-challenged such as myself). I think just cutting the rubber could be okay. Should I go ahead and cut the rubber in the size of the washer, along with cork tape if it's in that area? It's sounding like yes but I'd feel more reassured after folks have a look at the pictures, since there's no going back after cutting the rubber.

The levers were working perfectly fine before the hoods and wrap, so I don't feel unsafe or anything... and I personally really like the way the safety levers look.

Comments and tips appreciated!
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Old 05-15-12, 04:11 AM
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Yes, you've got clearance all the way around the post, so the hood should stay exactly where it is after you trim around the washer.

That's the key, having the hood clear the washer but without any noticeable gaps.

A sharp single-edge razor with a 45-degree point is recommended, in other words a box cutter blade.

And like I said, if you shorten the spring inside the post by 2 coils, then the screw can thread in a little further so you can delete the star washer.

That's an interesting treatment to the padded tape.
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Old 05-15-12, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Yes, you've got clearance all the way around the post, so the hood should stay exactly where it is after you trim around the washer.

That's the key, having the hood clear the washer but without any noticeable gaps.

A sharp single-edge razor with a 45-degree point is recommended, in other words a box cutter blade.

And like I said, if you shorten the spring inside the post by 2 coils, then the screw can thread in a little further so you can delete the star washer.

That's an interesting treatment to the padded tape.
Got it! Thanks for clarifying. I've got a small disposable scalpel I can use to cut around the washer without gaps. I'll also get rid of the serrated washer... it was digging into the plastic ring anyway (piece in the center of the parts pic). Going to try this when I get home.

I used six coats of amber shellac on yellow cork tape:
https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...-tape-tutorial
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Old 05-16-12, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by ThermionicScott View Post
This is somewhat off-topic, but if you converted to newer levers and added "cross levers" to the tops, they'd be more comfortable and functional.
I have a 1973 World Voyager with safety levers, and man, they are awesome. If you have a nice pair with well tuned brakes, they are perfectly functional. CHEAP turkey levers suck - but I am a fan of a good set.
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Old 05-16-12, 11:51 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Yes, you've got clearance all the way around the post, so the hood should stay exactly where it is after you trim around the washer.

That's the key, having the hood clear the washer but without any noticeable gaps.

A sharp single-edge razor with a 45-degree point is recommended, in other words a box cutter blade.

And like I said, if you shorten the spring inside the post by 2 coils, then the screw can thread in a little further so you can delete the star washer.

That's an interesting treatment to the padded tape.
It worked! Thanks, dddd!

Safety levers clear the rubber. I could probably slim them down some more but at this point they're functional and aesthetically pleasing.


Originally Posted by custermustache View Post
I have a 1973 World Voyager with safety levers, and man, they are awesome. If you have a nice pair with well tuned brakes, they are perfectly functional. CHEAP turkey levers suck - but I am a fan of a good set.
Agreed. I have cross levers on a 2010 road bike. They serve their purpose but turkey wings have their place too
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Old 05-17-12, 01:53 PM
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Glad to hear the job went well on what looks like a nicely-detailed bike (let's see a full photo please).

No joke, I've used turkey levers for cyclocross racing and mountain-bike riding (at modest speeds!!!) over steep, technical terrain.

The way that these levers serve to allow one to descend with their hands on the top portion of the bars simulates a 15cm-shorter stem, which is the number one criterion for safe descending. This allows the rider to hang waaay back and still have brakes.

My turkey-levered touring bike (btw, with randyjawa's Shimano hoods, but in black):

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Old 05-20-12, 08:45 PM
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I'll post one soon. Hoping to get a new saddle first!
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Old 05-20-12, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Glad to hear the job went well on what looks like a nicely-detailed bike (let's see a full photo please).

No joke, I've used turkey levers for cyclocross racing and mountain-bike riding (at modest speeds!!!) over steep, technical terrain.

The way that these levers serve to allow one to descend with their hands on the top portion of the bars simulates a 15cm-shorter stem, which is the number one criterion for safe descending. This allows the rider to hang waaay back and still have brakes.

My turkey-levered touring bike (btw, with randyjawa's Shimano hoods, but in black):

love the color of your miyata. And that pattern on the top tube! Did you leave the foam grips on?
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Old 05-20-12, 10:39 PM
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Thanks.

I had to use that Cinelli "logo" finishing tape for something, and it sure covers scratches well.

I believe those grips are all of 20-something years old. I've put several thousand more miles on them and the bike came with almost 3k miles already on the Huret meter.

only 5-10 years ago, these touring bikes were flooding into the thrift shops, generally for 20-40 dollars.
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