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Bike Boom of the 1970s

Old 05-21-12, 04:16 PM
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Bike Boom of the 1970s

Does anyone have any stories or memories from the 1970 bike boom? If you could answer any of these questions I'd love to hear your ideas.

What do you believe attracted people to bikes in the 1970s?

Was cycling, in the 1970s, a individualistic type of sport? Or was it a sport that people built communities around?

Were the majority of cyclists in the 1970s riding to race? Or just for the enjoyment of getting out on a bike?
Do you think the introduction of the 10-speed derailer peaked people's interest in biking?

Were people buying bikes in the 1970s buying bikes for the first time? Or were they upgrading to something better?

Was the bike boom just a fad?

Do you have any stories about your experiences racing in the 1970s?

Was cycling an "elitist" sport in the 70s?

Do you think people were attracted to cycling in the 70s as a form of escapism from the pressures of society?

What prompted your interest in bikes?

What prompted your interest in competitive cycling?
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Old 05-21-12, 04:40 PM
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What do you believe attracted people to bikes in the 1970s?
For one thing, a lot of people coming of age at the same: freedom, the counter culture, wanting to be different, affordability, enviromental issues, heathy living, being self sufficient.

Was cycling, in the 1970s, a individualistic type of sport? Or was it a sport that people built communities around?
I'm not sure it was considered a sport unless you were racing. As a regular rider, you tended to become part of the cycling community in your area.

Were the majority of cyclists in the 1970s riding to race? Or just for the enjoyment of getting out on a bike?
I'd think most were using it as transport and enjoyment.

Do you think the introduction of the 10-speed derailer peaked people's interest in biking?
No, that happened decades before the 70s...

Were people buying bikes in the 1970s buying bikes for the first time? Or were they upgrading to something better?
I'd think many buying for the first time, with many quickly giving it up because it was still work.

Was the bike boom just a fad?
No.

Do you have any stories about your experiences racing in the 1970s?
I was second in a time trial once, but I didn't race, though I belonged to the racing club, and trained with them.

Was cycling an "elitist" sport in the 70s?
I don't think so, though it wasn't very mainstream.

Do you think people were attracted to cycling in the 70s as a form of escapism from the pressures of society?
I don't believe so...

What prompted your interest in bikes?
I rode bikes from the time of a small child, my stepfather taught me to build them when I got older. He had a 50s 10-speed I always lusted after, which promoted my interest in finer bicycles.

What prompted your interest in competitive cycling?
All my friends were doing it and it was fun to go fast.
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Old 05-21-12, 04:40 PM
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To me, the boom really started in the 1960s, as young riders first caught Stingray fever (and ones like me who did not have the $$, ended up with one of the myriad of knockoffs). From there, some Stingray riders upgraded to a "ten speed" bike, like a Schwinn Varsity or Continental. I got my Continental in 8th grade.

The boom was tied to the baby boom, as baby boomers started to ride bicycles. Many in my neighborhood skipped moving up to a road/racing bike, and joined the mini-bike craze (Honda mini-trail 50s and 70s were really popular).

I was in about the middle of the baby boom. Earlier baby boomers missed the Stingray craze. By the 1970s, people my age were getting their second or third bicycle, not the first. And the last bike I bought during that period was the "off to college" bike. I was fortunate enough to go to a college where bicycles were the norm, and the campus was covered with bicycle paths.

I would answer no to just about all your questions. The boom was not about racing. Instead, the Stingray craze really kicked things off for people my age. Kids with cruiser style bikes went out and bought knockoff banana seats and butterfly handlebars = poor kid's Stingray. I did that with my first bike. Just about every kid in the neighborhood did the same thing. Nothing individualistic about buying a Stingray (or knockoff), like all the other kids up and down the street.

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Old 05-21-12, 05:43 PM
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I got home from Vietnam in March 1969. I was wired for a long time trying to find something to keep me occupied.Someone suggested buying a bicycle and ride the paint off of it. I didn't know that was possible but I was willing to try anything once. It was actually 6 more years before I finally went to a bike shop in Houston Texas. I can remember waiting and waiting and waiting to get some help and was just about to walk out when someone asked if they could help me. That’s how I ended up with my current 1976 Schwinn Super Le Tour 12.2 that you may have seen in a few pictures. I bet I didn't ride it a dozen times. I have no idea why I've toted it around all these years. In 1984 after retiring from the military, a great-aunt died and left me her one owner Black '76 Superior.

That's all I've got to say about that.
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Old 05-21-12, 06:15 PM
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Peugeot UO-8s stick out in my mind. A certain type was really attracted to them. They were somewhat of a status symbol around my area. This was a time when people were moving up from 3-speed "English racers" (but you could still quickly sell practically any used 3-speed for $25 to $35). With all those gears and fancy handlebars, Schwinn Varsities were pretty impressive to WWII vets buying bikes for their kids. The lightweight UO-8 with the fancy decals was super impressive. The Japanese bikes, however, offered much more at a lower price point. I preferred them back then over comparably price European bikes. I was looking for alloy quick release wheels, alloy cotterless cranks and leather saddles even as a kid. SunTour derailleurs were my favorite. There were also many poorly made bikes back then. It is hard to imagine now how people would actually go into a store and buy some of this junk, or that the stores would actually sell it. If you remember some of the cars from the '70s, however, it was a low point in manufacturing quality IMO.
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Old 05-21-12, 06:23 PM
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I was just a kid then, but that was a weird time when you see it now in films. Everyone riding a bike was wearing short shorts (mostly red, for some reason) and tube socks and running shoes. with a tennis shirts or T-shirt tops. Every biker you saw on the street also rode with their hands on the bar tops with fingers at the ready to use (only) their "safety levers". People also tended to ride frames a bit too big for them, so the seats are usually slammed close to the top tube. Many did not use any kind of foot retention on the pedals, so foot placement was usually bad with many pedaling on their arches. I think there were lots of people back then that should have never been on a bike, but I guess the gas crisis help fuel the bike boom as a sort of alternative mode of transportation for many. In the end, not too many people were really concious about what brand bike you had, as long as it was new and a "ten speed". Helmets no way, it was sweatbands tennis visors and caps for most people.
It wasn't all bad in the end, because it helped a lot of people dscover cycling.....till their bike boom bike eventually fell apart because they got zero maintenance and got permanently parked in their garage, then it's off to other 70's distractions like disco dancing, drinking!........and I guess, drugs too!

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Old 05-21-12, 06:53 PM
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I had a Western Auto knock-off sting ray, then graduated to a Varsity. Even as a dumb early teenager I could tell it was a tank. No one I knew was "into" bikes but I browsed the catalogs from the LBS and decided I needed a bike made out of this 531 stuff. The Raleigh Gran Sport was about the least expensive 531 bike I could find, so that's what I bought, in 1973. I still have it.

When I got to college I met some racers, and that was a real awakening. Wool shorts with chamois, cycling shoes, shaved legs, tire glue, etc. The bikes were the coolest things I'd seen - full Campy race machines, tinkered with endlessly and ridden hard. I wound up riding with them quite a bit but never took up racing, other than a couple really low-key citizen races and club time trials.

I wouldn't say it was an elitist sport, so much as a subculture that thoroughly engrossed those involved, but that remained off the radar of mainstream America until the days of Lemond. Breaking Away didn't hurt either.

There may have been a boom, but, at least where I was (Western Michigan) the number of serious riders and racers was quite small compared with what I see these days. We were often harassed by rednecks who no doubt saw our outfits as some sort of assault on their masculinity.
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Old 05-21-12, 07:13 PM
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I remember Eisenhower's heart attack in 1955 and the appointment of cardiologist Dr. Paul Dudley White as the president's personal physician. White is recognized by most medical authorities as the founder of preventive cardiology, and his message that bicycling is an ideal exercise for maintaining a healthy cardiovascular system was promoted in bicycle manufacturers' advertisements and in public service announcements in the sixties and seventies. This call to exercise by such a noted authority was instrumental in popularizing cycling in the sixties and seventies, especially among adults.

I believe Dr. White was at least partially responsible for the bike boom.
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Old 05-21-12, 07:29 PM
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My memory of the decade: how much I absolutely lusted after a PX10 but could never afford one (or, for that matter, anything else even remotely close in stature.)
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Old 05-21-12, 07:34 PM
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Lots of right answers here. My answers would be the same as dbakl's except that I never competed, never knew anyone who did, didn't know any 10-speed-bike community.

It was a strange and stressful time, late 60's to early 70's. A bike was inexpensive and for some people a partial answer to the two oil shortages. I'd ridden a bike since I was a child. I bought a UO8 in '72 because it seemed like a good idea. I chose it not because it was a status symbol but because it seemed the best bike for the money and it fit my expected usage. I still ride it.
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Old 05-21-12, 07:41 PM
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One of the effects of the Bike Boom was a shortage of bikes. I remember ordering my first 10 speed in February, and waiting till June for delivery.

Another thing I remember is reading "Bicycling" magazine. It was THE bike magazine. Then around 1972-3 "Bike World" came out. I bought the first issue at the LBS. It had just a paper cover with black and white photo on it. Most articles in Bicycling were touring related. Bike World introduced more racing related stuff. I ordered Campy small flange hubs(the latest craze as most bikes came with large flange hubs) from an ad in Bike World. Took about 6 weeks for delivery.

The Lambert/Viscount Aerospace bike, Teledyne Titan, and Exxon Graftek were great innovations in the 70's creating a whole new way of thinking of frame construction. I think it also spurred component makers like Weyless, Hi-E, Phil Wood, and others.

1973 Motobecane LeChampion retailed at $425.

In 1974 a local Schwinn store offered me a Paramount track bike (that someone ordered then changed their mind) for $300. I think retail was $350. Earlier that year I had purchased a Paramount track bike from John VandeVelde's(Olympic, Pro, and father of Christian - current european pro) father. Full Campy with many chainrings and cogs for $200.

Of all my racing experiences the one i remember most is my first Super Week in Milwaukee. I was a 16 yr. old Junior racer. About an hour before my race a friend of mine came up to me all excited and said "Greg LeMond is here!". My response. "Who's Greg Lemond?"
LeMond, 14 and an Intermediate at the time, raced the Junior race. He won.
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Old 05-21-12, 07:44 PM
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Going out on a trip on a bike was pretty big then too. The lure of touring. Breaking out of the bonds of home, parents and school and seeing the country. Places that sold backpacking gear also got into panniers and front bags. I can't remember what prompted a buddy and me to do it but we both bought lightweight ten speeds, racks and panniers.

Our Peugeot PX-10 and Gitane Tour de France were completely unsuitable for the task, but we loved them. Rode tubulars and fixed flats on the side of the road or around the camp fire at night. Granola. Bags of nuts. Sigg cook set and Svea camp stoves, the whole nine yards. We got a lift from an old hippie reverend in his 49 Hudson Hornet, bikes and all, up to Tacoma Washington and started there. Rode up around the Olympic Peninsula, stopping off in Victoria, B.C., and up to the tip of the northwest U.S. as far as we could, then down the coast. Sometimes we did 60 miles a day, sometimes 6 or seven. Stopping where the fancy took us.

Some Hippie girl took us in somewhere near Hoquiam , as I remember, and let us stay the night in her cabin. Met interesting, generous people all along the ride. All we had was cheap "tube tents", essentially a tubular piece of plastic one strung between two trees. Completely unsuitable for the conditions, which consisted of rain, rain and more rain. We were trying to keep the weight down. Many a morning we spent two hours in the local laundromat burning up quarters drying out our down sleeping bags and clothes. We got about two thirds the way down the coast of Washington and my pal decided he was in love, had been pole-axed by the Hippie girl with the hairy arm pits. He turned around and rode back. I continued on, down the coast of Oregon. I've seen that friend only once in the intervening years. That was in 1971 or 72. I can't remember which. He still lives up near Lake Ozette. And I'm here.

One of the best adventures of my life. Can you imagine riding a 21 pound bike with 50 pounds of gear strapped to it down a narrow two lane blacktop with huge, fully-laden logging trucks rushing past your shoulder at 60 miles per hour...while coming on to a hit of window pane acid? Me neither. It all seems like a dream now but the memories bring a smile to my face. That was my first experience with lightweight European bikes, and there's been a spot in my heart for them ever since.

Bike boom? I didn't realize there was one going on, until it was long over and written about in books.

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Old 05-21-12, 08:07 PM
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Any time I think of Bike Boom, Ken Kifer comes to mind. This page about Bicycling in the Seventies, being a pretty pertinent answer to some of the OP's concerns. Look through his stuff. The man's opinion, coupled with his researched information, proves to be food for thought, every time I read it.

Anyway, for those who have not been to Ken's site, it is worth a visit, and a read. My opinion, of course.
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Old 05-21-12, 08:31 PM
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I was there, I bought several bikes during (and prior to) "the boom" but they were all used until my first Nishiki Pro. Bought new, too big and swiftly sold to a college kid taking it up to Humbolt State and I bought downscale: a new Nishiki Semi-Pro...the Pro was better.
My responses are very much like dbaki's, except I'd say: Yes, it was a fad for many of the participants. Plenty of my friends bought whatever bike their peers pressured them into believing was "best" at the moment: funny thing to look back and remember that included Schwinn Continentals, Raleigh Gran Prix(s) and Peugeot UO-8s. There were a lot of easy marks back then. My father got the bug and despite my recommendations he bought a new Centurion LeMans. He rode it a while for transportation and eventually it became a cob-web catcher in the garage...very much typical. It wasn't a 'first bike" for him, either, he rode as a child and teenager all over Southern Calif, but it was his first purchase of a bike as an adult...that was one big change. Bikes could be more than kid's toys.
I had a friend-of-friend who was a summertime amateur racer: took off to train and race every summer in Italy (he had family there). That guy was both my first glimpse into the (yes, elitist) world of cycling as sport, as well as the source of a couple really elite bikes that he sold off to friends after he came back at season's end. He was the only guy in my very large high school to do this and the jocks just didn't know what to make of him: he was obviously very fit and a competitor, but you could see them trying to figure out a reason why they should kick his *ss...
I got drawn into "gear worship" more than the love of sport, so spent way more energy trying to acquire my dream bike instead of just riding what I had...but I never lost interest in bikes, so that's better than leaving it all behind in the garage, I think.
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Old 05-21-12, 08:45 PM
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The 70s:

I got a gold Phillips "ten speed" in 1970 or 1971. My father and I were walking through J.C. Penny and say it on display. Exotic at the time. My father biked a lot as a young man in England on his Hercules. He was quite taken with the Phillips and bought it for me. Quite a step up from my Hawthorn balloon tired single speed. As a kid, the bike was about freedom and I rode it everyhwere. "Ten-speeds" were not common and people were amazed that I could hold it over my head with relative ease. Shifting was horrid and the bike was actually too big for me.

My parents gave me $100 when I graduated from high school. I used it to purchase a Raleigh Grand Prix. I rode it to campus and went on organized rides. Later, I toured the British Isles on the bike. My girlfriend purchased a green mixte Puegot in 1973 so we could go on rides together. I remember that they were in short supply and we felt lucky to find it. Still in the 70s (1979) I purchased a bike from an new company called Trek (710) becasue I was involved in more organized rides and the Raleigh was, I thought, the reason I was slow. Still have the Trek. Not so the girlfriend.

The Bike Boom I experienced was a confluence of a bulge in the population (the baby boom) and the fitness craze. The boom was waning by the oil crisis times. It was not elitist. In fact, people I experienced on organized rides today are fare more elitiest and not as friendly. I found bike riders in the 1970s to be more "crunchy granola." They did not want to be racers, they wanted to tour. This likely drove the touring bike boom of the 1980. Then began a swing toward everyone training for something and being racers. Also, in my retro-grouch opinion, adopting some rather stupid "innovations." Now the swing appears to be back to "crunchy granola" and practicality. I welcome the change.

I believe the introduction of light weight (as compared to balloon tired schwinns) and skinny tires (for then) were just as important as the RDs and gears as the latter worked poorly at best. The bike boom included fads (e.g., stingrays) but overall was not a fad as it moved bikes from kids to adults, a view the is still with us, if not universal.
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Old 05-21-12, 10:33 PM
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I rode bikes all over hell and gone in the 70's, but i was way
too stoned for most of that decade to remember much about it.

It was a great deal of fun, though.

I think Proteus design kicked off about then, not too far from
where I went to school in College Park, MD. Very early on in
the custom build frame movement here in the USofA.


1972: Across the street from the University of Maryland, 3 young bike enthusiasts decided to make their own bikes and a booming business was begun. Proteus took a very hands-on, proletariat approach... you could buy a bike frame, or a bike frame kit, or have your kit's tubes mitered by Proteus, or have your bike painted after you made it at home!
Proteus also was a prime supplier for building bits and tubing. They published a frame building manual (even had a second revised edition, both sadly long out of print)) which made the magical art of frame construction more accessible to the average craftsman.
Frames were made by various employees who changed regularly, yet, on occasion, highly trained master builders also came & went at Proteus. Perhaps most notable was Koichi Yamaguchi, who went on to have his own workshop in Colorado and build quite a reputation.

https://www.classicrendezvous.com/USA/Proteus.htm

Me, I rode a lot of second hand Peugeots of the low end variety.
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Old 05-21-12, 11:11 PM
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I'm the classic "started on a Stingray, moved up to a Varsity" kind of guy. Kind of clueless about theboom when it was happening. I do know that riding was cool. Toward the end of the seventies, beach cruisers started showing up. Graduated high school in 1979. My graduation present was a Univega Viva Sport. Not just a great bike, but a revelation. Wish I hadn't of sold it to the wrong person who. Guy only rode it once or twice and then let it rot way in the back yard. It disappeared after he divorced. I love bike boom bikes, especially the low end cheapies.

I found a Centurion Le Mans & a Viscount Sebring for free. I would have loved the Centurion after I outgrew the Varsity. Instead, I had a Continental that was stolen, a Raleigh women's three speed that destroyed what little social life I had, a hand-me-down Royce Union, and a Huffy 10 speed that was the worst experience on wheels ever. No redeeming features. It was two years old when I acquired it. Everything was broken or about to break. The rims would warp into different shapes during my shift at work so that the ride home was made impossible by the now dragging brakes. I believe it collapsed into metal & plastic dust one day while no one was looking. No idea what happened to it.

This topic is not appropriate for online chat. We need beer & pot to do it justice as well as giving the needed period flavor.
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Old 05-22-12, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Flying Merkel
We need beer & pot to do it justice as well as giving the needed period flavor.
Ha, ha. Our favorite weekend ride back in the 70s was about 80 miles. Started with a tough climb up a long hill, wound around on the crest to the north, then climbed another towards the west. At the top of that one we'd fire one up because next was about 12 miles of downhill to the beach, then the flats south back home. The downhill was really sweet in an altered state, even though it went from hot as hell at the top to gray, cold and misty at the coast, but that was part of the thrill.

I'd usually end the ride with a quart of beer, a bag of Dorittos and a half gallon of ice cream. Then sleep the rest of the day.
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Old 05-22-12, 09:38 AM
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I just did a "mental checklist" (which is a major accomplishment, considering the substance abuse) of all my friends and acquaintances from that era that I still have some contact with: only 3 or 4 are still "active" cyclists (though many still have bikes in garages).

I think that zero of the parents of my school-age friends, who tried it, stuck with cycling past the boom.

I think I may be the only one who went through all the other knock-on fads: touring/camping, mountain bikes, racing (or wannabe)...to finally arrive at "collecting" C&V and wrenching on them all.

Much much higher (no pun) percentage of those friends who were indulging in intoxicants in the '70s kept pace or increased right through all these decades.

My conclusion: some "fads" have real staying power...dope really is dope.

"stay in school."
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Old 05-22-12, 10:44 AM
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And get a haircut....................
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Old 05-22-12, 11:12 AM
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The bike boom was very inclusive of people and their reasons- gas prices spiked in the early 70's, but recreation was a big factor, too. Bikes were much more affordable, too. I would say touring more than racing- racing was barely on the radar. I wore black wool bike shorts, poly-pro jersey, Italian shoes, and an early plastic Bell helmet, and I was a real oddity.

I wonder, though, if the real bike boom is NOW. I see many, many more people riding, roadies in particular, than I did back then. There's the whole evolution of mountain biking, road racing is much more visible, clubs, fund raising rides, touring vacation companies, on & on. And now even a rank noob wears cycling shorts, a jersey, cleated shoes, and a stylish helmet.
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Old 05-22-12, 11:30 AM
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You can count me in the Stingray ('69 Apple Krate), moving on up to the 10 speed crowd. I really wanted a 531 tubed bike, but didn't have enough lawn mowing money, so I settled for a '72 (maybe '73) Gitane Interclub. I let the old folks (parents) convince me to swap the tubulars for tubed wheels before delivery, though. Wish I hadn't done that. Rode it through HS and college. A great ride was to head down to the New River, tube and imbibe all day, then ride back to the fraternity house. Sure couldn't do that these days.

Additional foggy memory: During HS I was mostly a weekend rider, not a commuter. I rode the yellow bus with the rest of 'em. But one day I decided to beat it with my bike, and rode so hard I puked on the school lawn when I arrived. Good times.

I never knew any juniors/ locals that raced.
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Old 05-22-12, 11:39 AM
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Does anyone have any stories or memories from the 1970 bike boom? If you could answer any of these questions I'd love to hear your ideas.

I started cycling with the local AYH club in about 1971 at age 12. By 13 I was leading rides. Started racing in '73 at age 14.

Q: What do you believe attracted people to bikes in the 1970s?

A: On the heels of the 60s, and the Ecology movement, bikes were somewhat counterculture and in keeping with the times. Also it was a fad.

Q: Was cycling, in the 1970s, a individualistic type of sport? Or was it a sport that people built communities around?

A: The latter. Locally AYH and FBCI racing clubs had closely knit communities and did all sorts of activities together, including volunteering. Large weekend centuries and double centuries were popular, as is still true today.

Q: Were the majority of cyclists in the 1970s riding to race? Or just for the enjoyment of getting out on a bike?

A: No. Vast majority were "club" riders, who did group rides that even then were rated A, B, and C. The A group was competative, like today, and included some racers. The rest were out to have fun. They were sometimes referred to as "tourists."

Q. Do you think the introduction of the 10-speed derailer peaked people's interest in biking?

A: No, they had been around a long time before the bioke boom of the 70s.

Q: Were people buying bikes in the 1970s buying bikes for the first time? Or were they upgrading to something better?

A: I don't quite understand what you're asking here. Many people bought 10-speeds for the first time, ranging from crappy Huffys to Colnagos. Some people upgraded, and some bought multiple bikes.

Q: Was the bike boom just a fad?

A: It was more than a fad, but fad was a large part of it. Everyone wanted a 10-speed whether they planned to ride it or not. That's why there're so many well-preserved 70s bikes--many were barely ridden. But the bike boom was also a movement that affected changes cycling in America which are still felt today.

Q: Do you have any stories about your experiences racing in the 1970s?

A: Yes, but I'd have to kill you if I told. Racing then was an attempt to copy racing in Europe. My first big road race when I was 13 or 14 had so many entries that they started it in two "heats." I broke away and was way ahead in the first heat, but as I approached the finish line the County Sherif Deputy pulled out and started the second heat right in front of me. I had to brake hard and slow down. Someone from the second heat beat me by 1/10 of a second. So I came in second.

Q: Was cycling an "elitist" sport in the 70s?

A: Not at all. A $350 high end bike was within the means of any high school kid who worked and saved his money. And it was counterculture back then.

Q: Do you think people were attracted to cycling in the 70s as a form of escapism from the pressures of society?

A: Not sure how to answer this. Are all avocations escapist?

Q: What prompted your interest in bikes?

A: I grew up with stories about the local double century--TOSRV, which started in the 60s. It sounded like a great adventure. Also I lusted for the Schwinn Paramount my neighbor had.

Q: What prompted your interest in competitive cycling?

A: I liked riding fast, people encouraged me to try it, and I could be my own coach (following the CONI Manual).

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Old 05-22-12, 11:46 AM
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sound like the OP is doing a research paper

ok in 1970 I was 14. I was living in a very small town in montana (www.chinookmontana.com) People talked about dam hippies.

Looking at it through the lens of time the bike boom was part of the growing improvment in communication that both opened the world and made it smaller.

Prior to the tibke boom there were 2 types of bikes available to me. Single speed coaster brake3 bikes and English 'racers'...the classic 3 speed IGH, north road handle bar and caliper brakes bike. eve

The bike boom brought in exotic looking bikes, 10 speeds .how could you use so many gears? hard leather seats and wierd handlbars....even in the hardware stores that sold bikes.

The next town down the road (big at 12,000 people) even had a bike shop open. I remember seeing a $400 fuji with tubular tires there and lusting after it (totally not practical for the area...I still imagine finding it a a garage sale sometime when visiting my dad )

So the bike boom and bikes were a parallel experience to me learning more about the world beyond my home town.

I can rembember being so excited to by my first ten speed. a bright blue Azuki (at the bike shop) and I havn't looked back


I also think the stingray boom laid a foundation for the bike boom in that many kids outgrowing stingrays were open to different and faster bikes.
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Old 05-22-12, 12:05 PM
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I rode bikes all over hell and gone in the 70's, but i was way
too stoned for most of that decade to remember much about it.


My youth as well. No fancy gear or 'touring' prep. We decided to go somewhere we'd just grab a few things and start off. Usually wearing jeans. (It pains me now to even think of riding 50 miles or more going commando in Levis). Stealth camping wherever we could find a quiet spot. Kept a patch kit and a pump with the bike at all times, but otherwise carried no tools and I can't recall ever having a serious issue.
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