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Mangusta brand road bike info?

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Mangusta brand road bike info?

Old 01-06-05, 09:30 PM
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bigcranky
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Mangusta brand road bike info?

Here is another thrift store mystery. Found an older 10 speed bike with Mangusta on the seat tube along with 3000 elsewhere. It has an aluminum frame and no lugs. I found very limited information on this, and so I thought I would ask the experts here. It is in very good condition and they are asking $60. Anybody out there who can elaborate on this? Appreciate your help.
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Old 01-07-05, 11:47 AM
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Mangusta bicycles were a road product produced by Mongoose. They were made in the mid eighties and distributed by Service Cycle. Ther were three models the 1000, 3000, and 5000, the 5000 being their top line. These models were aluminum, they also mad a Columbus tubing steel model that came fully chromed before this series. They were quite decent machines except a bit heavy by todays standards. A good bike for the price, if my memory serves e right they sold somewhere between 200 and 400 dollars.
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Old 01-07-05, 11:22 PM
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bigcranky
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Thanks for the info. I really appreciate all the fine information in these forums. I am looking to get into some serious exercise including cycling. Haven't ridden for MANY years and want to start the process but investing conservatively. Having seen this bike, and having "lurked" on these forums for a while, it seemed like a good possibility for me both in quality and price. I had just never heard of this brand or model before. I absolutely do not have any serious financial resources to invest, so used is the way to go for me now. Again, thanks for the help.
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Old 01-08-05, 11:57 AM
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T-Mar
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Some minor corrections to bosco boy's post. The three models that used the same frame were the 3000, 5000 and 7000. Also, only the 3 main tubes are aluminum. The rear triangle is chromium-molybdenum steel. You can verify this with a magnet.

The frames are actually lugged. The lugs have 1.5" internal plugs that are thermally bonded to the main tubes. The outer surface of the lug is the same diameter as the aluminum tube and gives the impression of lugless construction. However, if you look closely, you may be able see mating line. Sometimes the paint did not hide it. Also, in the case of the seat lug, there is no internal plug for the seat tube, resulting in the seat tube being a smaller diameter than the lug. Traditional tube-in-lug construction was required in this location so that the seat tube could support the seat post for its entire insertion length. An internal 1.5" plug would have only provided only about 3" of support (1.5" of lug + 1/5" of plug), The only other option would have been a longer internal plug, which would have imposed a weight penalty.

The frames look remarkably like the Univega models that were being marketed at the same time. The seat lug and bolt-on stays are identical. It is common knowledge that many Univega were made by Miyata. However, in this case there is no resemblance to the aluminum models offered by Miyata. The other known supplier of Univega frames was Kuwahara and this may be the source used for the Mangusta.

Road tests of the day found the bicycles to be 'comfortable, stable, fun to ride'. FYI, the era for these bicycles was the late 1980s and the price for the Model 3000 was in $370-$400 US range, depending on the actual year.
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Old 01-09-05, 12:16 PM
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Thanks for the detailed info. Since I am a newbie and getting into cycyling, and heavy at about 275 pounds, would this be a suitable bike to start with? Will the frame, alloy wheels (Araya), and overall construction be satisfactory? I am looking for something solid and reliable to start with to begin the process of getting in shape and losing weight, as well as enjoying the cycling. Thanks in advance for any further input on this.
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Old 01-10-05, 12:29 PM
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I owe bosco boy an apology. After further investigation, it appears that Mangusta made a line-up change in 1988. The original line-up for the three Mangusta aluminum/steel frames were the 3000, 5000 and 7000, but in 1988 it changed to the 1000, 3000 and 5000. So this is one of those rare cases where both are correct.
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Old 01-10-05, 04:45 PM
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I would be interested in getting a copy of a review on this bike back when it was current. Also, where do you guys find the information sources for the research you do? I expect that there are a number of people who have years of experience and have resources of their own, but are their sources for the rest of us? I have utilized the regular sources I have heard of on this forum, but, as in this example where it is more obscure, where do you go? Thanks!
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Old 01-11-05, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by bigcranky
Thanks for the detailed info. Since I am a newbie and getting into cycyling, and heavy at about 275 pounds, would this be a suitable bike to start with? Will the frame, alloy wheels (Araya), and overall construction be satisfactory? I am looking for something solid and reliable to start with to begin the process of getting in shape and losing weight, as well as enjoying the cycling. Thanks in advance for any further input on this.

In all honesty, at 275lbs an older aluminum frame, particularly a bonded aluminum one, may not last long. (I feel your pain, being about 240 myself.) Aluminum tends to get more brittle with age, and unlike steel it does not bend before braking, resulting in sudden catastrophic failure rather than cracking or warping first. I also have an issue with the glued frame construction. If these are anything like the old Vitus framesets (I have a Vitus 979 in the garage), I wouldnt recomend riding it on a day to day basis.

In my opinion, if your looking for a second-hand road bike, or anything from the 80's, I'd look into one of the many cro-moly steel frames from that era. Comfortable ride, and built to last. If you realy want aluminum, I would stick to welded aluminum frames made after 1999 or so.

my $.02
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Old 08-02-16, 05:29 AM
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Warning: 11 1/2 year old thread.

Picture for posterity sake, and for future online reference.

Mangusta 3000 from a CL posting.
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Old 08-13-16, 06:20 PM
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More to add to the ancient thread

I'll add to the 11 year old thread with another craigslist ad from Myrtle Beach. Obviously the brifters are an "upgrade" (My retrogrouch side likes friction shifters). 1988 Mangusta 5000 according to the seller.



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00Y0Y_lxBKnzBR2xy_600x450.jpg (52.5 KB, 152 views)
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00R0R_122qwjFYRF5_600x450.jpg (27.6 KB, 149 views)
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01212_j9W5RWrwBfl_600x450.jpg (54.9 KB, 150 views)
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00707_7s0yjGpSsoJ_600x450.jpg (38.6 KB, 148 views)

Last edited by Reddbiker; 08-14-16 at 07:12 AM.
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