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Show Your Vintage MTB Drop Bar Conversions

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Show Your Vintage MTB Drop Bar Conversions

Old 02-25-16, 06:01 PM
  #4751  
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to be fair theyre all underwhelming, but (IMO) what it lacks in power it makes up for in consistency
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Old 02-25-16, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Taxi Rob
I think youu misunderstood, the 90mm is fine, the 70mm version is underwhelming
Nope, I understood you just fine. I have the 70mm version and have no complaints about how it performs.
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Old 02-25-16, 07:41 PM
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Originally Posted by debit
Nope, I understood you just fine. I have the 70mm version and have no complaints about how it performs.
You said you were running the XLFDD 90mm drum brake.... do I need to go back and quote you or are you looking for an argument for no reason whatsoever?
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Old 02-25-16, 07:52 PM
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Do you have the XFDD? That is the 70mm version. I can't go on about what you say you have or don't have if you don't know. My experience with the 70mmm SUCKS. PERIOD. It barely hauled me to a stop without using the rear brake as well. I don't recommend it to anyone. The 90mm XLFDD is a whole nother ballgame. Stops like it should for that much weight. And yes, I adjusted the cable properly, and I even had the Sturmey levers, also properly adjusted.
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Old 02-25-16, 08:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Taxi Rob
Pics aren't visible from either of my browsers. Privacy settings?
- OK - I fixed the links in the original post. I think.
there's also an album here: https://goo.gl/photos/dWY7zbBkWffWgky26
- the linear pull brake images should be near the end of the album.
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Old 02-26-16, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Taxi Rob
You said you were running the XLFDD 90mm drum brake.... do I need to go back and quote you or are you looking for an argument for no reason whatsoever?
Dude, I'm not the one arguing. You said the 70mm were worthless, I replied that I didn't have any problems with mine. I just did a review of my posts about the bike and don't see where I mentioned the model, ever. If I mistakenly mislabeled it elsewhere I'll own up to it, but I think you either made an assumption or are confusing me with someone else.
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Old 02-27-16, 08:27 AM
  #4757  
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I think the new Citi Bikes in NYC have 70mm Sturmey Archer drum brakes. Probably fine if you're just cruising around. Probably inadequate for a downhill mountain bike. I'm building a commuter with and X-RD3/X-FDD (3-speed/dynamo/70mm drum) setup and will be very surprised if is not perfectly adequate for my intended use. I'll report back after some time on the bike.
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Old 02-27-16, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by debit
Dude, I'm not the one arguing. You said the 70mm were worthless, I replied that I didn't have any problems with mine. I just did a review of my posts about the bike and don't see where I mentioned the model, ever. If I mistakenly mislabeled it elsewhere I'll own up to it, but I think you either made an assumption or are confusing me with someone else.
Oh, now I see, I was looking at another post but you responded, nevermind.

Last edited by Taxi Rob; 02-27-16 at 11:48 AM.
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Old 02-27-16, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by mrv
- OK - I fixed the links in the original post. I think.
there's also an album here: https://goo.gl/photos/dWY7zbBkWffWgky26
- the linear pull brake images should be near the end of the album.
Apart from better braking/easier setup, it makes the bike itself look ten years newer than it is.
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Old 02-27-16, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by debit
Dude, I'm not the one arguing. You said the 70mm were worthless, I replied that I didn't have any problems with mine. I just did a review of my posts about the bike and don't see where I mentioned the model, ever. If I mistakenly mislabeled it elsewhere I'll own up to it, but I think you either made an assumption or are confusing me with someone else.
It was Mumonkan's post about the xlfdd with pics, but you jumped in the middle of me reading it and responding to it. Ugh. Sorry. I try not to go too far back in the threads but I'm not on the forum much these days.
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Old 02-27-16, 01:43 PM
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Old 02-29-16, 11:58 AM
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Little better image of my 95 Stumpy M2 with drop bar conversion. I like to say, when she turned 21 I took her to a bar, a drop bar. https://www.flickr.com/photos/chunti...posted-public/

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Old 02-29-16, 12:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Chunt61
Little better image of my 95 Stumpy M2 with drop bar conversion. I like to say, when she turned 21 I took her to a bar, a drop bar. https://www.flickr.com/photos/chunti...posted-public/
Wow that bike looks fast standing still. Is that radial lacing in the front for a particular advantage? I think that's radial lacing anyway. I'm not up on my lacing patterns.
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Old 02-29-16, 01:44 PM
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Thanks! That's radial lacing yep, on the front wheel. Not by design, just part of the parts package I had sitting around in the garage during my attempt to do the conversion under 100 bucks. The wheels were the original spec on a 2001 Gary Fisher Sugar 1. They're actually beautiful light wheels. Bontrager Race Light with re-branded Hugi hubs and nice ceramic braking surfaces.
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Old 02-29-16, 02:45 PM
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that thing is rad.
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Old 03-01-16, 02:27 AM
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I recently moved back to Oregon after a few years in NC and totally forgot about this project that I was storing in my parents garage. Fount the axiom rack for $5 at a thrift store and the Deore RD at the co-op along with the tires for $6. I had to coax a crappy rear rack onto the front to complete the ensemble. I am going to change the stem for a better one because I'm pretty sure this one is from a BSO.
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Last edited by degan; 03-01-16 at 08:01 PM.
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Old 03-01-16, 06:22 PM
  #4767  
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This is my '90/91 Ross MT Rushmoore, nothing special as far as rigid bikes go, had entry level parts but I like the geometry, I stripped the paint, still some left but im running it baremetal, the reach is a little far because of the phillippe stem (100mm) The first thing I bought was 26x2.35 Fat Franks, its actually why I bought the bike in the first place, I had baloon tire lust and wanted to see what it was all about. It still needs the kinks worked out but its a runner, today was its first voyage around the harbor. I had some fenders from a old 3 speed huffy that i rolled and stretched to fit, I still need to mount the front. I will be running it as a single chainring, as soon as I get shorter bolts.

Bare Metal Ross by Ryan Silva, on Flickr
Bare Metal Ross by Ryan Silva, on Flickr
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Old 03-01-16, 06:52 PM
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While working on 90 DB Apex for the drop bar conversion, I found a 87 Schwinn Cimarron. I am now planning to convert the Cimarron into the drop bar. It's been stripped to clean and re-lube. However, build is stuck as I am still waiting on Salsa Cowchipper bar to arrive

Here's how it arrived:


Stripped to clean, and on hold until the bar and other parts to arrive.
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Old 03-02-16, 03:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Taysherm
Here is my Specialized Hardrock conversion. This thread has been a real inspiration. I think the bike is a 1995 model, but I would love if someone could clarify that for me. The frame was in great shape when I picked it up from Craigslist for $50.The rest of the parts came mostly from my parts bin. I did put about $100 into it. Itís a sweet ride for $150. I will replace the wheels with something fit for touring/commuting once I have some more money to put into the project. I just need to decide if Iím going to run a dynamo and lights before acquiring a wheelset.

Thank you to all that have inspired me and helped me determine what I wanted to do with this project. Iím sure it will continue to be a work in progress as I get more miles on it.

The before and after pictures make it look like a different bike. It was just too dark when I shot the after pictures this evening.


As Wrk101 said, you can check the components. I have a Hardrock GX sport and was directed to bikepedia when asking here at BF and it appears to be a 1995 by their list, but still, little matched and the size & color wasnt listed for any year this bike was made, and iv yet to find another this color in google searches of all types (silver body, purple/hot pink lettering). After a cleaning, I did find the pedals were marked "94" and the RD is marked "SC" - according to the shimano date codes S -1994, C - March. Hope this helps!

O 1990
P 1991
Q 1992
R 1993
S 1994
T 1995
U 1996
V 1997

A - Jan
L - Dec
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Old 03-02-16, 03:42 AM
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I love how this looks. Did you clear coat it or do anything else to prevent it from rusting?

Originally Posted by MeatloafOvadose
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Old 03-02-16, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by MeatloafOvadose
This is my '90/91 Ross MT Rushmoore, nothing special as far as rigid bikes go, had entry level parts but I like the geometry, I stripped the paint, still some left but im running it baremetal, the reach is a little far because of the phillippe stem (100mm) The first thing I bought was 26x2.35 Fat Franks, its actually why I bought the bike in the first place, I had baloon tire lust and wanted to see what it was all about. It still needs the kinks worked out but its a runner, today was its first voyage around the harbor. I had some fenders from a old 3 speed huffy that i rolled and stretched to fit, I still need to mount the front. I will be running it as a single chainring, as soon as I get shorter bolts.

Bare Metal Ross by Ryan Silva, on Flickr
Bare Metal Ross by Ryan Silva, on Flickr
<3.
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Old 03-02-16, 09:46 AM
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Originally Posted by hat and beard
I love how this looks. Did you clear coat it or do anything else to prevent it from rusting?
Nope! no clearcoat at all. The bike was originally gonna be painted a Teal color but I love bare metal too much. The real goal is to have this look on a better frame.

I still need to remove some of the previous paint in the hard to reach areas but I just gave it a WD40 rub anywhere I could reach, basically I soak a rag in it, or any other knockoff version of wd40 and keep rubbing the metal, so far its lasted a month without any rust, but im also not riding in the rain either. Im not worried about rust on this bike, surface rust is easy to rub off. Im sure the surface rust will form much faster once the weather starts really warming though.
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Old 03-02-16, 11:14 AM
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Chain tension and why small cogs wear out fast(er)... In short, one's riding and shifting style will affect the life of one's chain and the teeth on the cassette. In a previous post:
Originally Posted by wrk101
-snip-
Its the high gears that wear first, so that is the first place I see problems. Most of the time, its the freewheel or cassette, as anymore, I am checking the hanger as part of the rebuild process. I will reuse a freewheel or cassette that "looks good", but I guess I don't know enough as sometimes the ones that look OK aren't. Realize there are a lot of riders out there that rarely shift, and wear out their small cogs. That plus the small ones have a lot fewer teeth in contact with the chain, so they are getting a much tougher load than the big cogs.
When riding the chain is under tension. The greater the tension the faster it will wear as this will increase the forces the dirt particles inside the chain which are grinding wearing out the chain. Additionally as previously, if the small(er) cogs are used on the cassette, the load of the chain is applied to fewer teeth of the cassette and will accelerate wear.

The mechanics/physics is fairly straight forward. The force applied to the chain is a simple machine where there are two lever arms:
1. Pedal spindle to bottom bracket (fulcrum)
2. Bottom bracket to teeth of chainring.

For example, compare these two scenarios: a 48/26 tooth chainring/cassette combination versus a 24/13 chainring/cassette combination. Both provide the exact same gear ratio. A pedaling cadence of 90 rpm will result in the exact same speed and the cyclist will be applying the exact same force to the pedals. But what is also occurring is the tension in the chain will be twice as high when using the 24/13 combination. This will cause the chain to wear much faster with the 48/26.

This is also why 29'ers, in general, have smaller chainrings on the cranksets and why they're moving to larger rear cassettes. It's the same dual lever simple machine: cassette teeth to rear axle, rear axle to edge of the rear tire. The 29'er wheels are 12% larger diameter so a chainring/cassette combination which worked fine on a 26'er is going to have significantly (12%) higher gearing on a 29'er. Similarly, if moving from 26x2.5 mountain tires to 26x1.5 road slicks, one will get lower effective gearing as the rear wheel will be smaller. All things being equal, a smaller diameter rear wheel will be less wear on the drivetrain. But I digress... Back to the original point, using the larger chainrings will reduce wear on the drivetrain. To be clear, I am not advocating a lower cadence, if one can get the same gear ration on the large or middle chainrings this will provide greater drivetrain life.
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Old 03-07-16, 08:36 PM
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Anyone have On One Midge bar that they would like to get rid of? I ordered a Salsa Cowchipper bar, but they are backordeded till May. My dropbar conversion is on hold until I can get a bar. TIA.
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Old 03-07-16, 08:48 PM
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Originally Posted by BigSung
Anyone have On One Midge bar that they would like to get rid of? I ordered a Salsa Cowchipper bar, but they are backordeded till May. My dropbar conversion is on hold until I can get a bar. TIA.
I have a WTB/Specialized RM-2 Dirtdrop bar for sale. PM me if you're interested.
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