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First tubular flat today!

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First tubular flat today!

Old 07-13-12, 09:53 AM
  #1  
element-82
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First tubular flat today!

I am new to sew ups. When I bought my Px10, it came with 2 clement sewup tires. One was still good, so I kept it as the spare. I bought a set of Rallys a few months ago. Today, they were resurfacing the road (grooved pavement) at one of the intersections I cross on my commute. As soon as I crossed it, I got a flat. There was no doubt about where it was. There was a hole in the centre of the tire, hissing. I immediately thought about Rootboy's tire savers. Ok, I had never changed one on the road before, so now I had my chance. I had left about a 1/4 inch beside the valve stem unglued, as advised by a long time sew up rider. The idea being it would be easier to get a tool in there and start pulling off the tire. It worked well and with a fair amount of elbow grease, I got the tire off. The clement spare tire, went on well. It is nice and straight compared to the rallys. The clement rode like a dream. I felt faster for whatever reason. There really is no comparison between the clement and the rally IMHO. Anyway, I was 2km into my 25km commute, so I turned around and went home. Feeling somewhat defeated, I rode my other bike to work, and I walked my bike over the grooved pavement this time! Changing tubulars is not scary at all. It was a lot easier to change than I expected. It was a lot easier than a clincher for example. The only problem is that once the spare is gone, another flat and you are screwed. I am not giving up on tubulars, but am rethinking rallys.

Pb
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Old 07-13-12, 10:05 AM
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What a bugger! I had some rallys as well and flatted first ride. Since then I've used Continental Competitions that have a removable valve so you can put anti puncture goop in and corsa evo's with no punctures.
There expensive tires but you get what you pay for.
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Old 07-13-12, 10:09 AM
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+1 on competitions. Great tire
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Old 07-13-12, 10:19 AM
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Changing a tubular is no harder than changing a clincher, and may be easier. But then, you'll have more fun fixing the leak. This past weekend I had the pleasure of patching a tubular for the first time in 30 years. I had almost forgotten how much of adventure it is.

It's actually not as daunting as many think. The 2 big challenges are getting enough tube out of the small hole you sliced in the casing, and threading the needle to resew.

As you found out, there are huge differences between training tubulars and the good hand made ones.

-G

Good luck
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Old 07-13-12, 10:49 AM
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Congrats! I leave a 1" section opposite the valve stem without glue on the rim. The tire still gets it. This allows for a straight pull when you get to the valve stem.
See Dave Moultons Tubular section part one is an introduction, part 2 is repair: https://davesbikeblog.squarespace.com...ii-repair.html part 3 is gluing.
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Old 07-13-12, 11:41 AM
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Use tire sealant prophylactically. You might have just kept going.
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Old 07-13-12, 04:26 PM
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element-82,

Your experience sounds remarkably similar to mine. I bought an old De Rosa over the Winter with a nice complement of OLD tubular spares. I proceeded to purchase and mount two Continental Giros. Earlier this week I got a flat and mounted an old NOS Wolber Classic 290 - much nicer to mount, much straighter. FYI - I am also new to tubulars and have been experimenting with tire pressures. I started out with around 125 on my ancient Silca Pista and have steadily dropped the pressure to 105 rear 95 front - a real improvement on the not-so-great roads here in Seattle. The bike feels very light, yet grounded..it came alive and I couldn't be happier with the ride.
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Old 07-13-12, 04:38 PM
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Another thing I've found is that a can of Mastik-1 is a great investment. I started off with Pastali but I like the Mastik-1 much better, much easier to apply with very little mess and seems to create a very strong bond with the rim. I'm using flux brushes from the hardware store - they are just the right size.
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Old 07-13-12, 10:25 PM
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Originally Posted by tremolo1965 View Post
Another thing I've found is that a can of Mastik-1 is a great investment. I started off with Pastali but I like the Mastik-1 much better, much easier to apply with very little mess and seems to create a very strong bond with the rim. I'm using flux brushes from the hardware store - they are just the right size.
^^^ Good glue... Very sticky!!!

My attempts at repairing tubulars for patching have always proved unsuccessful. Sometimes I can get an easy fix by removing the valve & using fix-a-flat. Although, 2 sidewall blowouts last week from older tires went right into the garbage can...!
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Old 07-14-12, 12:03 AM
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Give up on tubulars!

Get some nice 23-25 clinchers. I cringe when I hear of newer people wanting to ride sew-ups. It was sooo great to get rid of 'em! I raced USCF 14 years- all on sew-ups. The 700c clincher is so much more reliable and offers so much more option , mostly for being even MORE reliable. I rode behind the truck in Breaking Away- and if I were doing it now I'd DEFINITELY use clinchers- much safer.

Authenticity on a bike is one thing, but if you plan on actually RIDING it, it's sometimes nicer to modernize. Most of the people riding when the vintage bikes were in their heyday wouldn't hesitate- especially with tires more reliable than sew-ups.
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Old 07-14-12, 12:25 AM
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Originally Posted by harpon View Post
Authenticity on a bike is one thing, but if you plan on actually RIDING it, it's sometimes nicer to modernize. Most of the people riding when the vintage bikes were in their heyday wouldn't hesitate- especially with tires more reliable than sew-ups.
Sew-ups are all I have, and I have several of them... I bought the bike from the person who ordered it from a shop in Scandicci (Firenze, IT) 35 years ago. He had a decent collection of sew-ups - Gomitalia, Michelin, Wolber, Vittorias (worn-out..), as well as Regina freewheels, spokes, etc. that he gave me with the bike. At first I shunned them as old, but most of them still seem good. I am going to look for some Campy Record hubs at leisure, and build a set of clinchers eventually; but right now I'm enjoying the tubular thing!

Last edited by tremolo1965; 07-14-12 at 12:28 AM. Reason: downgraded condition of tires from great shape, which probably isn't realistic due to their age..
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Old 07-14-12, 05:15 AM
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Well said.
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Old 07-14-12, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by harpon View Post
Give up on tubulars!

Get some nice 23-25 clinchers. I cringe when I hear of newer people wanting to ride sew-ups. It was sooo great to get rid of 'em! I raced USCF 14 years- all on sew-ups. The 700c clincher is so much more reliable and offers so much more option , mostly for being even MORE reliable. I rode behind the truck in Breaking Away- and if I were doing it now I'd DEFINITELY use clinchers- much safer.

Authenticity on a bike is one thing, but if you plan on actually RIDING it, it's sometimes nicer to modernize. Most of the people riding when the vintage bikes were in their heyday wouldn't hesitate- especially with tires more reliable than sew-ups.
Huh?

How exactly are clinchers more "reliable" and "safer" than tubulars?

Or is this just a simple case of trolling?
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Old 07-14-12, 07:07 AM
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Originally Posted by element-82 View Post
It was a lot easier to change than I expected.
For some reason, sew-ups are talked about as being difficult and untrust worthy.

Since when was gluing A to B difficult?
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Old 07-14-12, 07:31 AM
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I guess the main complaint is fixing them. But that comes with the territory once you decide to take the plunge. It's not much of a plunge. Like stepping off a low ledge into cool water.
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Old 07-14-12, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by prettyshady View Post
Since when was gluing A to B difficult?
I don't know.

In some cases, you don't even need to glue. Not only do I carry a spare tubular, I also carry a small, 2 oz bottle of Stan's sealant. When I flat, I first try the Stan's (unless it is a huge blow-out). And that usually works. No need to swap tires. If it doesn't work, I'll put on the spare. If the flat is so severe it can't be saved, I'll take a knife and slice through the offending tire. It peels off of the rim like a banana peel.

So again, I am with you. I don't understand why pouring 2 oz into a tube or peeling a banana is difficult.
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Old 07-14-12, 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
I guess the main complaint is fixing them. But that comes with the territory once you decide to take the plunge. It's not much of a plunge. Like stepping off a low ledge into cool water.
You can always pay a guy to do it.

Which brings up the only legitimate complaint of tubular vs. clincher. Tubulars are more expensive.
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Old 07-14-12, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by iab View Post
Huh?

How exactly are clinchers more "reliable" and "safer" than tubulars?

Or is this just a simple case of trolling?
Mehhhh....there's always people on the other side of the fence on everything......
Just like some people swear by suspension leather saddles and others shake their heads at them.......just like some would never consider clipless pedals and even consider them dangerous, while others just think they are being silly not to even try them......SIS vs Friction.......DT vs brifters......People should just ride what they want and feel comfortable with and not worry too much about what the next guy is doing on their bike....Mehhhh....JMOs...

Chombi

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Old 07-14-12, 12:13 PM
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Let's go back to what Harpon said about being the guy behind the truck in Breaking Away. Tell us more. I had heard you really were doing 58 back there. I did some riding for the short lived TV series. They filmed it in Athens, Ga. I pooled all the money I got from the show to buy my first custom steel frame. An RRB.
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Old 07-14-12, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by harpon View Post
Give up on tubulars!

Get some nice 23-25 clinchers. I cringe when I hear of newer people wanting to ride sew-ups. It was sooo great to get rid of 'em! I raced USCF 14 years- all on sew-ups. The 700c clincher is so much more reliable and offers so much more option , mostly for being even MORE reliable. I rode behind the truck in Breaking Away- and if I were doing it now I'd DEFINITELY use clinchers- much safer.

Authenticity on a bike is one thing, but if you plan on actually RIDING it, it's sometimes nicer to modernize. Most of the people riding when the vintage bikes were in their heyday wouldn't hesitate- especially with tires more reliable than sew-ups.
i know what you mean.
I have clinchers on all my bikes. I do long/fast rides on clinchers (on a swb recumbent). This paticular bike is the only sewup ride i have. It is not high mileage. I use it for commuting the odd time or special occasions. I dont mind the higher cost, and i love the ride.

But, do tell, you rode in the movie?

Pb
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Old 07-14-12, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by harpon View Post
I rode behind the truck in Breaking Away-
This is you? 43 seconds into the Vid: Breaking Away
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Old 07-14-12, 10:10 PM
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Originally Posted by harpon View Post
I rode behind the truck in Breaking Away


~kn
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Old 07-15-12, 05:21 AM
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I'm curious about sealant. I've never considered it, thinking it would make the eventual repairing of a tubular tube a messy hassle, and, maybe, impossible. Not so?
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Old 07-15-12, 09:52 AM
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I liked tubulars but they went with the Raleigh Competition I sold earlier this past year. Never had any issues or flats. The rear has a section of the sidewall ripped with the tube bulging out but no flat and I still commuted on them. I loved how they rode and they were cheaper then a decent set of tires and tube including a spare. I'm a sucker for the three for $50 Servizio's at Yellow Jersey. If I could find a reasonable pair of tubular wheels I'd pick up another set. I also used sealant in those tires and never had to use the spare that comes with that deal they offer.
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Old 07-15-12, 05:38 PM
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
I'm curious about sealant. I've never considered it, thinking it would make the eventual repairing of a tubular tube a messy hassle, and, maybe, impossible. Not so?
It is liquid latex. You can buy the stuff at your local costume store if you like. Stan's has a giant 16 oz bottle, but on the road I prefer the 2 oz. All you have to do is unscrew the valve core. The bottle has a Yorker top so you just squeeze it in. No fuss no muss and fills holes (they claim) up to a quarter inch. Most my flats are tiny and it works great.

Some folks use it as a preventative measure. To me it adds unnecessary weight and the tire feels (completely subjectively) a little deadened.

If you go in for a patch repair, some will stay liquid, all of the latex does not set up. But you can wipe it away with any cloth.

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