Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Should a cottered crank spindle be dry upon reassembly?

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Should a cottered crank spindle be dry upon reassembly?

Old 07-13-12, 03:23 PM
  #1  
Mexican Street Dog
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Mexican Street Dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Coastal Maine
Posts: 130

Bikes: 1936 Raleigh Golden Arrow; Kona Honzo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Should a cottered crank spindle be dry upon reassembly?

I read somewhere that the cotter itself should be greased but that the spindle should not. I had a hard time getting the crank off the spindle on the off side. The Sheldon Brown articles that I found did not say either way, neither does my Glenn's Manual. I tend to grease things but...

Thanks
Mexican Street Dog is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 03:31 PM
  #2  
bibliobob
Senior Member
 
bibliobob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Point Richmond, CA
Posts: 2,956

Bikes: '53/'54 Bianchi CDM, '62 Frejus, '62'62ish Altenburger Cinelli Mod B, '69 Rene Herse, '72 Motobecane Grand Record, '73-74 Colngao Super,'78 faux Confente, '82 Medici Gran Turismo, '82 Medici Pro Strada, '85 Eddy Merckx Pro

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was taught to grease the hell out of them......
bibliobob is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 03:36 PM
  #3  
auchencrow
Senior Member
 
auchencrow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Detroit
Posts: 10,327
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I don't know what is/is not correct, but personally I grease things that :
a) are intended to move
b) are subject to differential corrosion (eg., steel to aluminum)
__________________
- Auchen
auchencrow is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 03:51 PM
  #4  
repechage
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 13,366
Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 949 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 25 Times in 20 Posts
The Campagnolo technical support master Bill W. (forget how to spell the last name) from the day suggested just enough Campagnolo grease as you could leave behind with your fingers if you were trying to clean the spindle off with greasy fingers.
None on the arm.
Actually he used a more colorful metaphor to describe the amount of grease to deposit, but I think that was as he was talking to an all male audience at the time and it was the 1970's.
repechage is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 04:09 PM
  #5  
skoda2
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Ocala, Florida
Posts: 244

Bikes: 74 Romic, 83 Basso, Lotto, 88 Condor, Prestige MTB, 12 Soma, Groove

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 21 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
+ 1 on that; lightly grease the cotters before driving them into the crank arms, however do not grease square tapered axles if overhauling square tapered bottom brackets, the crank arm and the tapered section of the axle should be clean and dry. During the 70's we would kill for Campagnolo grease and after use keep the empty tubs filled with auto part store white lithium grease, and nightly would dream of owning some Campy tools!!!
skoda2 is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 04:12 PM
  #6  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 67 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I use a very thin coating of grease on the shaft, usually there is some left on there after putting the axle through the cups and bearings and I just smear it around then put the arms on.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 04:18 PM
  #7  
3alarmer
******
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 17,345

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 232 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14782 Post(s)
Liked 108 Times in 95 Posts
Works pretty well either way, in my experience, and I've
tried it both ways. Theoretically, you can maybe seat the
pins better if you use a light grease film, but since the proper
way to re install them is with some sort of press of modified vise,
it makes little practical difference.

Just don't try to seat them using the nut to pull them up, because
you will either strip the threads or not seat them deeply enough.
3alarmer is online now  
Old 07-13-12, 05:36 PM
  #8  
Mexican Street Dog
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Mexican Street Dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Coastal Maine
Posts: 130

Bikes: 1936 Raleigh Golden Arrow; Kona Honzo

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Since the spindle and the crank arm both are a little rough from corrosion, I think I will put a light coating of grease on the spindle. I'm keeping the bike to ride so if anything goes awry I'll catch it. The cotter I will grease, and having no press will use a hammer. Yaae hammer!!!

Thanks guys.
Mexican Street Dog is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 06:04 PM
  #9  
clubman
Youngman Grand
 
clubman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 5,600

Bikes: roadsters, club bikes, fixed and classic

Mentioned: 85 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1008 Post(s)
Liked 40 Times in 35 Posts
Originally Posted by Mexican Street Dog View Post
I read somewhere that the cotter itself should be greased but that the spindle should not. I had a hard time getting the crank off the spindle on the off side. The Sheldon Brown articles that I found did not say either way, neither does my Glenn's Manual. I tend to grease things but...

Thanks
Opposite for me. Spindle greased, cotters dry, use a press.
clubman is offline  
Old 07-13-12, 06:44 PM
  #10  
gaucho777 
Senior Member
 
gaucho777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 6,345

Bikes: '72 Cilo Pacer, '72 Peugeot PX10, '73 Speedwell Ti, '74 Nishiki Competition, '74 Peugeot UE-8, '85 De Rosa Pro, '86 Look Equipe 753, '86 Look KG86, '89 Parkpre Team, '90 Parkpre Team MTB, '90 Merlin

Mentioned: 58 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 407 Post(s)
Liked 18 Times in 15 Posts
Use a vise and a socket if you can (I started a thread about this a while back). If you must use a hammer, be sure to support the crank arm so the bottom bracket doesn't bear the force of the hammer strike. Otherwise, you are likely to damage the bottom bracket.
__________________
-Randy

'72 Cilo Pacer '72 Peugeot PX10 '73 Speedwell Ti '74 Nishiki Competition '74 Peugeot UE-8 '86 Look Equipe 753 '86 Look KG86 '89 Parkpre Team Road '90 Parkpre Team MTB '90 Merlin Ti

Avatar photo courtesy of jeffveloart.com, contact: contact: jeffnil8 (at) gmail.com.
gaucho777 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Spaghetti Legs
Classic and Vintage Sales
8
01-20-18 09:55 AM
engineerbob
Bicycle Mechanics
6
02-04-16 01:45 PM
jawnn
Bicycle Mechanics
30
06-24-13 01:20 AM
mazdaspeed
Road Cycling
54
07-13-11 03:24 PM
yellowpasta2000
Mountain Biking
9
11-29-08 06:22 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.