Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Do You Use Locktite?

Old 09-16-12, 10:54 PM
  #1  
jyl
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,514

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 333 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Do You Use Locktite?

Curious. Do you reckon there is a place for locktite in bicycle work?

I've sworn at previous owners who have glued threads permanently - last time it was a fixed cup. So I never use red locktite on bikes. And I never use locktite on screws, meaning fasters that have to be removed using just a screwdriver.

But I use a small dab of blue locktite sometimes on bolts and nuts. Like today I was mounting a headlight on a front rack. Small bolt that will get vibrated a lot and could let the light go bouncing down the road. Or there is a small Allen head bolt on my clipless pedal that is critical. If it comes loose the bike is unrideable. I will often locktite those.
jyl is offline  
Old 09-16-12, 10:56 PM
  #2  
JPZ66
Senior Member
 
JPZ66's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 679

Bikes: 1949 'Italian' , 1950 San Giusto, 1897 Union, and a number of "projects"... 198? Grandis, a couple of Mixte's...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yep. Blue on a number of things.

Joe
JPZ66 is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 12:31 AM
  #3  
calamarichris
Horse Categorie
 
calamarichris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Posts: 6,137

Bikes: '09 Felt F55, '84 Masi Cran Criterium, (2)'86 Schwinn Pelotons, '86 Look Equippe Hinault, '09 Globe Live 3 (dogtaxi), '94 Greg Lemond, '99 GT Pulse Kinesis

Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 200 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Not necessary IMO, no. I use 4 different types when working on motorcycle fasteners, and I ALWAYS use a torque wrench to the recommended torques on everything I work on. That's a lot of checking and a lot of extra work to check several hundred fasteners for a valve adjustment on a 4-cylinder shim-under-bucket engine, but I've seen what happens when mechanics estimate the torque and the engine ends up chewing itself into aluminum shards.

On bicycles, I've used the minimum-strength thread sealer twice:
~on chainring bolts, when trying to track down a creak that lay elsewhere,
~and a drop on the crankarm retainer bolts that came off once on a ride (my erstwhile reliable LBS technician needed to get his estimating arm re-calibrated), but in both cases, the solution lay elsewhere.
If you're working with lower-quality or older (much older) components that don't have a specified torque value, it might be a good idea, but most of my bikes have the good stuff and the torque values.

Most of the manuals I've seen specify torque values instead of thread sealers.
calamarichris is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 12:40 AM
  #4  
puchfinnland
MIKE is my name!
 
puchfinnland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: finland,baltimore
Posts: 2,883

Bikes: hans lutz, , puch mistral ultima,2x Austro Daimler Smoked chrome Ultima,Austro Daimler Mixte,Austro Daimler 531 mixte, flying arrow,F Moser,

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I see blue loc tight on canti brake arms and the small fine tuning screws attached to them.

other then that no I dont use it unless there is a location with an issue.
puchfinnland is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 12:48 AM
  #5  
thinktubes 
Fast+Bulbous
 
thinktubes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Across the street from Chicago
Posts: 4,385

Bikes: Battaglin Cromor, Ciocc Designer 84, Schwinn Superior 1981

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 298 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The blue stuff on Italian threaded BBs to keep them from unscrewing 34 miles from home (not that this has ever happend to me).
thinktubes is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 12:53 AM
  #6  
VeloBrox
Senior Member
 
VeloBrox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Oslo, Norway
Posts: 378

Bikes: 1951 Armand Carlsen, 1969 DBS Deluxe, 1949 Diamant, 1978 DBS Winner Tandem, 1955 Herkules... to infinity and beyond!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Call me a retro-grouch, but I use beeswax on almost all threads!

Beeswax isn't as strong as red Locktite, and can freely transform between viscous and solid form so I can use it again and again. Also it is insoluble in water and acid-resistant.
VeloBrox is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 01:23 AM
  #7  
peazweag
Senior Member
 
peazweag's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: albany,oregon
Posts: 350

Bikes: 1973 RALEIGH SUPER COURSE,85 FUI ALLEGRO

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
never ever!
peazweag is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 05:31 AM
  #8  
RobbieTunes 
Half drunk? Finish!
 
RobbieTunes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Very Southern Indiana
Posts: 25,368
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 332 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes. Blue.
Brake caliper mounting bolts
Chain ring bolts
Nipple ends of spokes
Stem clamp bolt
Pedal threads
Seatpost binder bolt

Some of these, I don't need to "hold" so much as I want to help keep moisture out of there.
__________________
Robbie ♪♫♪...☻
I have unfinished business.

RobbieTunes is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 05:51 AM
  #9  
qcpmsame 
Semper Fi
 
qcpmsame's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Barrineau Park, Florida
Posts: 12,326

Bikes: '80 Medici Pro Strada, '86 Tommasini Prestige, '12 CAAD 10 Ultegra

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 947 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
On bicycles I use the weakest formula of the Blue Loctite, never use the red grades on anything for a bicycle. Supposed to be heated to release and could very well pull out threads. Mainly, I use anti-seize on every threaded connection and a torque wrench in the correct size range to maintain the connection. The anti-seize keeps air and moisture out of the threads, and unless the threads are fairly coarse this should keep the threaded connection as tight as it should be. Bicycles rarely require a red grade locking fluid according to the guide on Loctite's website and common sense in applying a locker that requires heat, or being beat on with a hammer, to be released.

Here is a link to Loctite's site and the product guide:
http://www.loctiteproducts.com/product_advisor/
I have absolutely nothing to do with Loctite or any anti-seize product what-so-ever.

On motorcycles it depends on the connection's location and the type of fastener being used. Use the guide at the Loctite website on which grade of chemical to use in specific applications. JMHO, YMMV, ABCDEF, etc.

Bill
__________________
I Didn't Chose To Have Parkinson's Disease, I Have Chosen To Not Allow It To Define How I Live
Life Member "Hairy Eared Engineer's Society"
Semper Fi,! Its A Way Of Life.

Last edited by qcpmsame; 09-17-12 at 06:15 AM.
qcpmsame is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:04 AM
  #10  
Chrome Molly 
Senior Member
 
Chrome Molly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Forksbent, MN
Posts: 3,270

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 292 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Pedal cleats
Chrome Molly is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:07 AM
  #11  
jolly_ross
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 621
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I had a friend bring back a bike after I'd serviced the rear hub - the cones had come loose again. In my defence I'm pretty sure I'd done the locknuts tight, and this was a fair amount of time after the service - but, you know, customer service - I apologised and reset the cones. I tell you this - they are not going to come loose by themselves again. (Blue loctite - fwiw)
jolly_ross is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:21 AM
  #12  
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Posts: 17,421
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by VeloBrox View Post
Call me a retro-grouch, but I use beeswax on almost all threads!

Beeswax isn't as strong as red Locktite, and can freely transform between viscous and solid form so I can use it again and again. Also it is insoluble in water and acid-resistant.
I sometimes use beeswax. I got the idea from Grant Petersen.
Grand Bois is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:25 AM
  #13  
Poguemahone
Vello Kombi, baby
 
Poguemahone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Je suis ici
Posts: 5,328

Bikes: 1973 Eisentraut; 1970s Richard Sachs; 1978 Alfio Bonnano; 1967 Peugeot PX10

Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
No, and I work with a number of French and Italian bicycles. It probably helps that I own a Var 30 tool and install fixed cups using it. Never had one work loose.
__________________
"It's always darkest right before it goes completely black"

Waste your money! Buy my comic book!
Poguemahone is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:26 AM
  #14  
qcpmsame 
Semper Fi
 
qcpmsame's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Barrineau Park, Florida
Posts: 12,326

Bikes: '80 Medici Pro Strada, '86 Tommasini Prestige, '12 CAAD 10 Ultegra

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 947 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Grand Bois,
Is the beeswax a solid, like a stick application lubricant? It sounds like a good way to secure the threads from moisture and air, thus preventing a sieze or any galvanic action. Has this been your finding GB? Thank you in advance.

Bill
__________________
I Didn't Chose To Have Parkinson's Disease, I Have Chosen To Not Allow It To Define How I Live
Life Member "Hairy Eared Engineer's Society"
Semper Fi,! Its A Way Of Life.
qcpmsame is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:37 AM
  #15  
Michael Angelo 
Senior Member
 
Michael Angelo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Hurricane Alley , Florida
Posts: 3,874

Bikes: Treks (USA), Schwinn Paramount, Schwinn letour,Raleigh Team Professional, Gazelle GoldLine Racing, 2 Super Mondias, Carlton Professional.

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Concidering that new Campagnolo outboard BB cups and allen head crank bolts have loctite on them from the factory, I would say yes. I have used it on BB cups (French), and crank bolts. I also use the blue, "wicking" stuff on spoke nipples once I'm happy with spoke tension.
Michael Angelo is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:52 AM
  #16  
norskagent
car dodger
 
norskagent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: garner/raleigh nc
Posts: 3,372
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
blue (+ teflon tape) on my phil fixed cup, in my italian threaded merckx, after the cup started backing out despite professional install.
__________________
1989 Schwinn Paramount OS
1980 Mclean/Silk Hope Sport Touring
1983 Bianchi pista
1976 Fuji Feather track
1979 raleigh track
"I've consulted my sources and I'm pretty sure your derailleur does not exist"
norskagent is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 06:58 AM
  #17  
eschlwc
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: on the beach
Posts: 4,860

Bikes: '73 falcon sr, '76 grand record, '84 davidson

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 59 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
once, the blue stuff, on filed head badge screws that replaced rivets. worked great.
eschlwc is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 07:12 AM
  #18  
VeloBrox
Senior Member
 
VeloBrox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Oslo, Norway
Posts: 378

Bikes: 1951 Armand Carlsen, 1969 DBS Deluxe, 1949 Diamant, 1978 DBS Winner Tandem, 1955 Herkules... to infinity and beyond!

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by qcpmsame View Post
Grand Bois,
Is the beeswax a solid, like a stick application lubricant? It sounds like a good way to secure the threads from moisture and air, thus preventing a sieze or any galvanic action. Has this been your finding GB? Thank you in advance.

Bill
The beeswax I use comes as solid little droplets that you melt by rubbing it between your fingers. Then I just smear it over the threads and rub off any excess (I prefer using my fingers for all non-toxic fluids - even shoe polish). Given enough torque it becomes viscous, lubricating the thread and helping me control preload. Once set it becomes solid again, glueing the bolt fast. Torqued the other way it lubricates the bolt going out again. I use it even on BB cups and nothing has worked itself loose thus far. Can't say I've noticed any galvanization or oxydation where I've used it. I aslo put a little dab inside allen bolt heads to prevent water pooling up there.
VeloBrox is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 07:21 AM
  #19  
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Posts: 17,421
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 428 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Beeswax is a thread lubricant, thread locker and rust preventer all in one. I have a block of it that I use on the drawer slides on some antique furniture I have. It came from a woodworker's supply site.
Grand Bois is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 07:27 AM
  #20  
SirMike1983 
On the road
 
SirMike1983's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,627

Bikes: U.S. and British Roadsters

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes- blue on bolts that tend to loosen with vibration and which require removing the wheels to retighten. I'm thinking mainly of the bolts that attach ballooner fenders and the bolts that hold a fender light on the front fender. In order to get to those really, you need to pull the wheel, then tighten. I use the blue loctite so I don't end up having a loose bolt and then having to pull the wheel. My Raleighs don't seem to have as many bolts that require wheel pulling to tighten.
__________________
Classic American and British Roadsters, Utility Bikes, and Sporting Bikes (1938-1979):
http://bikeshedva.blogspot.com/
SirMike1983 is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 08:17 AM
  #21  
Tuc
collector
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Tucson, Arizona USA
Posts: 491
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes, the blue always goes on fenders, racks, baskets and the mounting bolts for brakes as well as the clamping bolts on the top of the tubes on suspension forks. I use a copper paste anti-seize almost everywhere else, but am willing to try bees wax - sounds interesting. Now that this thread has mentioned it, I have dis-assembled bikes with bees wax on it before but never realized what it was.
Tuc is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 08:22 AM
  #22  
qcpmsame 
Semper Fi
 
qcpmsame's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Barrineau Park, Florida
Posts: 12,326

Bikes: '80 Medici Pro Strada, '86 Tommasini Prestige, '12 CAAD 10 Ultegra

Mentioned: 81 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 947 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Grand Bois and VeloBrox,
Thanks for the information, it is appreciated.

Bill
__________________
I Didn't Chose To Have Parkinson's Disease, I Have Chosen To Not Allow It To Define How I Live
Life Member "Hairy Eared Engineer's Society"
Semper Fi,! Its A Way Of Life.
qcpmsame is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 09:16 AM
  #23  
due ruote 
Senior Member
 
due ruote's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 6,616
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 462 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Sometimes on fender bolts, always on the odd little locknuts on Suntour barcons that otherwise tend to go missing.
due ruote is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 09:29 AM
  #24  
zandoval 
Senior Member
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 1,787

Bikes: Univega, PR-10, Ted Williams,UO-8, Puch, PHLE, UO-18 Mixte

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 17 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes occasionally but really not that much since I now use a torque wrench to get loose stuff tightened down properly - I really thought that I was doing an adequate job just going by feel but now that I use the torque wrench I find literally no need for the Blue Locktight any more... Here's a link to a generalized Torque Table...

http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...ecs?highlight=
zandoval is offline  
Old 09-17-12, 09:34 AM
  #25  
T-Mar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 17,389
Mentioned: 400 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2305 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Blue thread locking compound is used by many bicycle manufacturers, especially on ATBs. It is typically found on fasteners such as cantilever stud bolts and stem bolts, where vibration could cause loosening and a potentially dangerous accident.
T-Mar is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.