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Old Trek Aluminum

Old 09-20-12, 01:57 PM
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Adrian_
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Old Trek Aluminum

I recently finished building up my first geared bike, a 1990 Trek 1420. I know the steel frames are sought after by collecters. Since i've had it I can't help but wonder the hierarchy of Trek aluminum. For the time would it have been low end, mid, high? Thanks for the help.
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Old 09-20-12, 02:11 PM
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Looks like the 1420 is in the middle of the 1990 Trek lineup.

[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 09-20-12, 02:11 PM
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Its all about the components. IMHO, the model number does not matter. In the last year, I sold a 1989 Trek 1000 (bottom of the line aluminum) for the same exact amount as I sold a 1989 Trek 2000 (top of the line aluminum). Both got good responses in the marketplace, and I sold both for as much or more as I get for a similar era steel frame Trek.
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Old 09-20-12, 04:12 PM
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I don't know much about Trek aluminum's.

Is it a bonded frame or TIG welded? I ask because I ride a Miyata 1400A, which is bonded, so I was curious to know if Trek ever got involved with bonded frames. Anyway, enjoy the bike and don't worry about what other C&Ver's think about aluminum. IMHO, they're great. I love mine.

Picture please!
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Old 09-20-12, 04:15 PM
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+1 on wrk101, but for a different reason, also.

For a few years, Trek would use one frame for 2-3 models, just change the model number based on component levels.

Centurion did this with the Ironman from 1987 to 1989, and Diamondback followed with the same protocol in the early 90's.

It appears Schwinn was doing the same thing with some of theirs, too, notably the Series Paramouns and PDG Aluminums.

I'm not sure about the 1420, but the 1450 and 2000, in one of those years, differed only in color and components.
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Old 09-20-12, 04:18 PM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
+1 on wrk101, but for a different reason, also.

For a few years, Trek would use one frame for 2-3 models, just change the model number based on component levels.

Centurion did this with the Ironman from 1987 to 1989, and Diamondback followed with the same protocol in the early 90's.

It appears Schwinn was doing the same thing with some of theirs, too, notably the Series Paramouns and PDG Aluminums.

I'm not sure about the 1420, but the 1450 and 2000, in one of those years, differed only in color and components.

I think everyone did it and most likely still does it. Bianchi did/does it and so did Cdale.
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Old 09-20-12, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Giacomo 1 View Post
I don't know much about Trek aluminum's.

Is it a bonded frame or TIG welded? I ask because I ride a Miyata 1400A, which is bonded, so I was curious to know if Trek ever got involved with bonded frames. Anyway, enjoy the bike and don't worry about what other C&Ver's think about aluminum. IMHO, they're great. I love mine.

Picture please!
Its bonded, rides pretty nice for 22 y/o aluminum I was expecting it to be harsher. Here's a pic from when I was about finished setting it up.
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Old 09-20-12, 07:08 PM
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In that era of Trek bike the 20 added to the normal number means the bike came from Trek with a Triple as opposed to the 1400 which was a double crank bike. The only exception to that was the 1000 which when it was a triple was a 1100. If I remember correctly the 1200 became a 1220 with the triple factory installed. Roger
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Old 09-20-12, 07:25 PM
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Neat info to know on that. Glad to see the pic again. It's an ace, bet it rides quick.
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Old 09-20-12, 08:13 PM
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Yep, it feels awesome keeping up with and sometimes dropping friends on $3,000+ 10/11 speed bikes.
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Old 09-20-12, 11:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Adrian_ View Post
Its bonded, rides pretty nice for 22 y/o aluminum I was expecting it to be harsher. Here's a pic from when I was about finished setting it up.
Nice bike, what frame size is it and what components you got there? What is the weight with pedals? Just wondering how light they are compared to a steel frame of the era.

Thanks
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Old 09-20-12, 11:40 PM
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You can see a list of the components here. It weighs just under 19 pounds with my 105 5700 pedals.
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Old 09-21-12, 03:40 AM
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I had a Trek 1420 for a while, always thought it was a nice bike. It originally came with Shimano 105 level equipment and 7 speed Deore DX derailleurs and hubs. I suppose that puts it around mid-range, but it always felt higher end to me. The 1420 was the sport touring version of the 1400, the differences being the Deore equipment and long cage RD.

Nice bike, looks great.

Here is a picture of 1990 1420 that I had. Unfortunately, it was too small for me.
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Old 09-21-12, 05:10 AM
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Woah, its funny how I was looking at that same bike before I built mine up to decide if I should keep it or not. Yours looks a lot better then mine with the chrome fork.
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Old 09-21-12, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Adrian_ View Post
Its bonded, rides pretty nice for 22 y/o aluminum I was expecting it to be harsher.
One of the design goals for that frame was ride characteristics comparable to a high-end steel frame. Tubing diameters and thickness were selected based on that.
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Old 09-21-12, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Adrian_ View Post
You can see a list of the components here. It weighs just under 19 pounds with my 105 5700 pedals.
Very nice build. Much lighter than some Alu bikes that have 105 components now.
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Old 09-21-12, 03:48 PM
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Great looking Trek Adrian.

Make sure to post it in the vintage aluminum thread that is floating around right now...
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Old 09-21-12, 04:36 PM
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I'll be sure to do that right after I throw on some gumwalls.
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Old 09-21-12, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Adrian_ View Post
I'll be sure to do that right after I throw on some gumwalls.
Good move.

I'm a real fan of gumwalls. I really don't like the look of a black tires, especially on vintage stuff. Tires look good with alittle color, whether they be gumwalls or some other color sidewalls to match the bike IMO...
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Old 09-22-12, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
One of the design goals for that frame was ride characteristics comparable to a high-end steel frame. Tubing diameters and thickness were selected based on that.
If I remember correctly from my days working in a shop back then, the Trek sales rep said that the design goal included making sure that their bonded aluminum frame was no more than 25% stiffer than a comparable Columbus SL frame, since that was the benchmark that was being used in the Klein vs. Cannondale patent infringement suit that was in the courts at the time. According to the rep, Klein's patent attorney had wangled an outrageously broad set of specifications that included the stipulation that any bike that was more than 25% stiffer than a Columbus SL frame infringed the patent.

JohnDThompson undoubtedly knows more about this, though, since he was working at Trek at the time.
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