Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

Vintage Headlights

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

Vintage Headlights

Old 12-19-12, 12:25 AM
  #1  
canflyboy 
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
canflyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 204
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Vintage Headlights

My Raleigh Sports came with a Sturmey Archer front Dynohub and the original front and rear head lights. I purchased a vintage looking Bobbin Classic Deluxe for my wife and it also has a Dynohub with a headlight. We actually like to ride at night, but as headlights, these suck! I'm used to using Cygolites on my bikes for my night riding and would like to upgrade. I'd like to keep the vintage look and came up with two options. Both are LED lights - one is battery powered and the other via the dynohub.

Can anyone comment on how much brighter these two lights would be versus the original stock filament bulb? Is it worth it or do I install a Cygolite for night riding and keep the originals for looks only?

Option 1 - Battery powered LED Light

Option 2 - Dyno Powered LED Busch & Muller HL Classic

Thanks

Canflyboy
__________________


1970 Raleigh Tourist, 1972 Raleigh Sports, 1984 Miele Road Bike SS, 1985 Bianchi Nuovo Alloro, Opus Avro 29er, Jamis Sonik, Donnelly G//C , Bianchi San Jose, Cervelo SL-SLC, Cervelo S3 Di2, Ridley X-Bow Commuter and a wife that loves me!
canflyboy is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 12:38 AM
  #2  
Captain Blight
Senior Member
 
Captain Blight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 2,473

Bikes: -1973 Motobecane Mirage -197? Velosolex L'Etoile -'71 Raleigh Super Course

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
There is absolutely no comparison; the LEDs do such a much better job. Now, that said, simply upgrading to a halogen or Krypton bulb helps a great deal. On my 6v systems, I like to run a 4.8V Krypton bulb. "Overclocking" the bulb takes a good bit of life out of them, but I also get a lot more light. Some-- our own Forumite Minisystem-- have had good luck retrofitting LEDs into vintage shells. I tried it and my results were lousy: the reflectors weren't designed with a tiny bright point source shining only forward in mind.

Some of the folks at the Candlepower forums are getting better results, but I don't know any specifics.
Captain Blight is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 01:34 AM
  #3  
Munny
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Belgium, Bicycle country
Posts: 240

Bikes: 50 ? More?

Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Liked 9 Times in 9 Posts
I came to have a look, the post title was attracting me.

I use other race vintage bikes with removable lights to cycle at night
But for the older ones, I'll keep to the original lights

Here is the front lamps of my 1936-37 Bekaert


I still want to reproduce the orignal right lens.
I'm planning to reproduce the left one in a silicon mold and duplicate it with transparant resin.
Munny is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 02:29 AM
  #4  
ftwelder
Senior Member
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Posts: 3,091

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by Munny View Post
I came to have a look, the post title was attracting me.

I use other race vintage bikes with removable lights to cycle at night
But for the older ones, I'll keep to the original lights

Here is the front lamps of my 1936-37 Bekaert


I still want to reproduce the orignal right lens.
I'm planning to reproduce the left one in a silicon mold and duplicate it with transparant resin.

That is one accessory that seems to evade me . Lights. Is that one generator or battery?
ftwelder is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 06:31 AM
  #5  
Italuminium
Cisalpinist
 
Italuminium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Holland
Posts: 5,556

Bikes: blue ones.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Soubitez made some very purdy headlights BITD. I wonder how hard a retrofit is to LED with the one I have gathering dust in the parts bin.
Italuminium is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 06:48 AM
  #6  
AZORCH
Senior Member
 
AZORCH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Liberty, Missouri
Posts: 3,115

Bikes: 1946 Hobbs of Barbican | 1966 Paramount P-13 | 1971 Raleigh International | ca. 1970 Bernard Carre | 1989 Waterford Paramount | 2012 Boulder Brevet | 2019 Specialized Diverge

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 124 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 22 Posts
Originally Posted by Italuminium View Post
Soubitez made some very purdy headlights BITD. I wonder how hard a retrofit is to LED with the one I have gathering dust in the parts bin.
I've given it a shot several times and had marginal success at best. As already noted, the reflectors seem to be the fly in the ointment (at least for me) in retrofitting. I am not especially well-versed in things electrical either, and I've attempted to emulate what seems to be greater success stories from the internet. I'm still coming up short and would love to see some success stories from our BF friends posted here.
AZORCH is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 07:02 AM
  #7  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,316

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1183 Post(s)
Liked 251 Times in 129 Posts
I've noticed (but not purchased) a retro-looking, metal light in a B&M package hanging on the wall at my LBS (Harris). Given how effective other B&M headlights are, I'd expect this one to be good too. But they aren't cheap.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 07:21 AM
  #8  
rhm
multimodal commuter
 
rhm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: NJ, NYC, LI
Posts: 19,606

Bikes: 1940s Fothergill, 1959 Allegro Special, 1963? Claud Butler Olympic Sprint, Lambert 'Clubman', 1974 Fuji "the Ace", 1976 Holdsworth 650b conversion rando bike, 1983 Trek 720 tourer, 1984 Counterpoint Opus II, 1993 Basso Gap, 2010 Downtube 8h, and...

Mentioned: 523 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1783 Post(s)
Liked 283 Times in 189 Posts
To retrofit an old headlight housing to run an LED, you have to fit the LED together with its own lens (which is a small acrylic parabolic reflecto). The LED comes on a hexagonal aluminum plate about 2 cm across, and the lens is in a cylinder about 2 cm long that fits onto that. You may be able to fit that LED and reflector combination into the parabolic reflector of an old lamp, or maybe not. It depends how the light bulb was attached to the parabola. You can get narrow, medium or wide lenses for most LED's now, and a narrow one provides very well focused light that is ideal for bicycle headlights.

Aside from fitting the LED and its lens, there is the matter of a heat sink. An LED produces heat and light at the same time, in the same place. It isn't a great deal of heat, but it is pretty intense at that point. The aluminum hexagon will disperse it to some degree, but you also want to attach that aluminum hexagon to another, bigger, piece of metal to disperse the heat farther. One way to do this is to replace the original parabolic reflector of your lamp with a disc of sheet copper, and attach the LED, with its reflector, to that. The copper disc mounts to the lamp with the same steel springs that held the original parabola, so the heat produced is transferred first to the copper and then to the lamp housing, which has enough mass that you won't even notice it getting warm.

As for the electronics, the fundamental challenge is that a dynamo produces AC power and an LED requires DC power. You can put a bridge rectifier in the circuit (this requires four soldered connections) or assemble your own from diodes (this also requires four soldered connections, so it isn't actually any more work than using a pre-assembled unit). Or you can go caveman and wire your headlight and tail light opposite; so one wire from the dynamo goes to the positive connection of the headlight and the negative of the taillight, while the other goes to the negative of the headlight and the positive of the taillight. As you ride, they will flash alternately.

Last edited by rhm; 12-19-12 at 07:25 AM.
rhm is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 07:42 AM
  #9  
Italuminium
Cisalpinist
 
Italuminium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Holland
Posts: 5,556

Bikes: blue ones.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Thanks, Rudi, really illuminating.
Italuminium is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 05:56 PM
  #10  
ftwelder
Senior Member
 
ftwelder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: vermont
Posts: 3,091

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm View Post
To retrofit an old headlight housing to run an LED, you have to fit the LED together with its own lens (which is a small acrylic parabolic reflecto). The LED comes on a hexagonal aluminum plate about 2 cm across, and the lens is in a cylinder about 2 cm long that fits onto that. You may be able to fit that LED and reflector combination into the parabolic reflector of an old lamp, or maybe not. It depends how the light bulb was attached to the parabola. You can get narrow, medium or wide lenses for most LED's now, and a narrow one provides very well focused light that is ideal for bicycle headlights.

Aside from fitting the LED and its lens, there is the matter of a heat sink. An LED produces heat and light at the same time, in the same place. It isn't a great deal of heat, but it is pretty intense at that point. The aluminum hexagon will disperse it to some degree, but you also want to attach that aluminum hexagon to another, bigger, piece of metal to disperse the heat farther. One way to do this is to replace the original parabolic reflector of your lamp with a disc of sheet copper, and attach the LED, with its reflector, to that. The copper disc mounts to the lamp with the same steel springs that held the original parabola, so the heat produced is transferred first to the copper and then to the lamp housing, which has enough mass that you won't even notice it getting warm.

As for the electronics, the fundamental challenge is that a dynamo produces AC power and an LED requires DC power. You can put a bridge rectifier in the circuit (this requires four soldered connections) or assemble your own from diodes (this also requires four soldered connections, so it isn't actually any more work than using a pre-assembled unit). Or you can go caveman and wire your headlight and tail light opposite; so one wire from the dynamo goes to the positive connection of the headlight and the negative of the taillight, while the other goes to the negative of the headlight and the positive of the taillight. As you ride, they will flash alternately.
If you had one of those giant housings you could stash batteries in there. I really dig those type.
ftwelder is offline  
Old 12-19-12, 08:09 PM
  #11  
mickey85
perpetually frazzled
 
mickey85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Linton, IN
Posts: 2,470

Bikes: 1977 Bridgestone Kabuki Super Speed; 1979 Raleigh Professional; 1983 Raleigh Rapide mixte; 1974 Peugeot UO-8; 1993 Univega Activa Trail; 1972 Raleigh Sports; 1967 Phillips; 1981 Schwinn World Tourist; 1976 Schwinn LeTour mixte; 1964 Western Flyer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
COuldn't you do a plate that goes right on the glass of a vintage headlight and mount 2-3 LED's with their reflectors, then run the heat sink behind it? If you vented the bottom, nobody would see it, and it would blow over the sink
mickey85 is offline  
Old 12-20-12, 04:48 AM
  #12  
Esteban32696
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 1,157
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
A conversion.

https://bicyclesafari.blogspot.com/20...ike-light.html
Esteban32696 is offline  
Old 12-20-12, 09:03 AM
  #13  
Velognome 
Get off my lawn!
 
Velognome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Garden State
Posts: 6,248

Bikes: 1917 Loomis, 1923 Rudge, 1930 Hercules Renown, 1947 Mclean, 1948 JA Holland, 1955 Hetchins, 1957 Carlton Flyer, 1962 Raleigh Sport, 1978&81 Raleigh Gomp GS', 2010 Raliegh Clubman

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 93 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 62 Times in 32 Posts
How about using one of these, they have a pair (clear +red)with a screw base that will work with a Miller lamp and SA dymo hub.

NICELITE SUPER LED LIGHT BULBSSUPERIOR REPLACEMENT MINIATURE L.E.D. BULBS FOR CYCLE LIGHTS, BICYCLE DYNAMOS AND HUB GENERATORS, FLASHLIGHTS,
HEAD TORCHES, HAND LAMPS, MAGLITE
®, MINI-MAGLITE®, ELECTRIC E-BIKES, LANTERNS, 3-D VIEWERS, INCLUDING VINTAGE MODELS


NiceliteTM is a range of the highest quality LED light bulbs,
around 6 times more efficient than halogen:

If you just install the bulbs, you'll get a much brighter light but with a strobe effect. Maybe that's good for day light riding? I was looking at the birdge recifiers at the Radio Shack, they seem small enough to fit in the housing of the lamp easy.



Then I thought....Since the lamp has a 3 position switch, why not run one straight for daylight ( strobe) One through the Bridge rectifier for night riding and one as an off setting?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
P8240204.jpg (84.7 KB, 57 views)

Last edited by Velognome; 12-20-12 at 09:15 AM.
Velognome is offline  
Old 12-20-12, 11:51 AM
  #14  
bobn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: South Florida
Posts: 726
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
If your original lights have screw bases, why not check out Tektite bulbs?
They make a led side emitting bulb which you could use with your original reflectors.
Unlike the front prefocused bulbs, this one emits light like your standard incadescent bulb. All around.
I think they come in preset voltages. You would have to check that out
The part # is LS407--$29.95--6V

Last edited by bobn; 12-20-12 at 11:58 AM.
bobn is offline  
Old 12-20-12, 03:53 PM
  #15  
gna
Count Orlok Member
 
gna's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,615

Bikes: Raleigh Sports, Raleigh Twenty, Raleigh Wyoming, Schwinn Le Tour Luxe Frankenbike

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Link 2: https://harriscyclery.net/product/bus...ators-3524.htm
gna is offline  
Old 12-20-12, 04:25 PM
  #16  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,316

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1183 Post(s)
Liked 251 Times in 129 Posts
Yep, that's the light I referred to in an earlier note. If it is anything like the other B&M lights then it is very, very good.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 12-20-12, 04:49 PM
  #17  
ilikebikes
K2ProFlex baby!
 
ilikebikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: My response would have been something along the lines of: "Does your bike have computer controlled suspension? Then shut your piehole, this baby is from the future!"
Posts: 6,123

Bikes: to many to list

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 15 Post(s)
Liked 45 Times in 25 Posts
All the lights I use are vintage generator powered, there to complete a certain vintage look that no new light can reproduce. You need a bike light because you actually need it to light your way so your idea to convert an old light with LEDS is a fine idea. I'd keep it generator powered, that way you'll save on batteries and you'll get a nice bright light while keeping that sweet vintage look.










This one is in line to be converted to a bike light. Its going to be mounted on my Schwinn Phantoms stem. (pictured below)




__________________
You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

Last edited by ilikebikes; 12-20-12 at 05:26 PM.
ilikebikes is offline  
Old 12-20-12, 06:08 PM
  #18  
Junk083
Senior Member
 
Junk083's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 180

Bikes: All City Space Horse

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've always wondered about these LED bulb replacements:

https://www.home.earthlink.net/~stein...erchandise.htm
Junk083 is offline  
Old 12-21-12, 07:49 PM
  #19  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 68 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Junk083 View Post
I've always wondered about these LED bulb replacements:

https://www.home.earthlink.net/~stein...erchandise.htm
They work... I have ridden with Jon, (the guy selling the bulbs). He had them in one of the old large style headlamps from the 50's. It did strobe, but put out some reasonable light. Nothing like the B&M Classic does. I have a B&M Classic (actually 3 of them) they put a solid pattern of light down and have the stand light too. My only issue is they are smaller than the 70's vintage chrome Raleigh headlights, roughly a third smaller and don't look quite right. I do use one on my Raleigh Twenty and it looks okay to me on that bike. I am going to try the LED replacements from Reflectalite, my stock wedge base tail light bulb has already been replaced by a standard LED 194/168 automotive bulb, IIRC I paid about $5usd for it at a truck stop somewhere. Compass Cycles has a screw base tail light LED with stand light built in for $20usd. I have a couple of these and have been pleased with the results.


Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 12-21-12, 08:12 PM
  #20  
tcs
Palmer
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 6,443

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ˝DT14

Mentioned: 26 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 799 Post(s)
Liked 278 Times in 188 Posts
Electricity. It's a fad.
tcs is offline  
Old 12-22-12, 09:29 AM
  #21  
Glennfordx4 
Holy Spokes it's Batsman!
 
Glennfordx4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 1,929

Bikes: Too many Bicycles to list

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)
Liked 43 Times in 31 Posts
Originally Posted by rhm View Post
To retrofit an old headlight housing to run an LED, you have to fit the LED together with its own lens (which is a small acrylic parabolic reflecto). The LED comes on a hexagonal aluminum plate about 2 cm across, and the lens is in a cylinder about 2 cm long that fits onto that. You may be able to fit that LED and reflector combination into the parabolic reflector of an old lamp, or maybe not. It depends how the light bulb was attached to the parabola. You can get narrow, medium or wide lenses for most LED's now, and a narrow one provides very well focused light that is ideal for bicycle headlights.

Aside from fitting the LED and its lens, there is the matter of a heat sink. An LED produces heat and light at the same time, in the same place. It isn't a great deal of heat, but it is pretty intense at that point. The aluminum hexagon will disperse it to some degree, but you also want to attach that aluminum hexagon to another, bigger, piece of metal to disperse the heat farther. One way to do this is to replace the original parabolic reflector of your lamp with a disc of sheet copper, and attach the LED, with its reflector, to that. The copper disc mounts to the lamp with the same steel springs that held the original parabola, so the heat produced is transferred first to the copper and then to the lamp housing, which has enough mass that you won't even notice it getting warm.

As for the electronics, the fundamental challenge is that a dynamo produces AC power and an LED requires DC power. You can put a bridge rectifier in the circuit (this requires four soldered connections) or assemble your own from diodes (this also requires four soldered connections, so it isn't actually any more work than using a pre-assembled unit). Or you can go caveman and wire your headlight and tail light opposite; so one wire from the dynamo goes to the positive connection of the headlight and the negative of the taillight, while the other goes to the negative of the headlight and the positive of the taillight. As you ride, they will flash alternately.
I have been toying with the same idea only for a 6v motorcycle headlight, I have a 1981 Honda XL250 that runs 6v and the headlight sucks. I picked up a single wire 6v rectifier from a old Yamaha 400 that I was thinking about using, I then thought about using this on a bicycle to power some LED's after reading about some of the conversions that were done, I just don't know if the AC output from a bicycle generator will be enough to work with it.

Glenn

Last edited by Glennfordx4; 12-22-12 at 09:38 AM.
Glennfordx4 is offline  
Old 12-22-12, 09:01 PM
  #22  
thryn
Senior Member
 
thryn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Sarasota, Florida
Posts: 66

Bikes: Gary Fisher Simple City 3; 1989 Bianchi Sport SX; 1970 Schwinn Twinn in need of work; other project bikes in various states of disrepair.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If there is a battery powered version of this, I'd jump on it. I've got a bullet light on my main bike that looks pretty snazzy but emits an utterly pitiful beam -- not so great for someone who does a lot of night riding. Aaaaaand my housemate swiped the (much less attractive) light I had that I could actually *see* by. *headdesk*
thryn is offline  
Old 12-22-12, 11:47 PM
  #23  
Captain Blight
Senior Member
 
Captain Blight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 2,473

Bikes: -1973 Motobecane Mirage -197? Velosolex L'Etoile -'71 Raleigh Super Course

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here's a thought:

Since I have an old dual-bulb Miller with an actual silvered reflector, and since the reflector is in contact with the shell, would that work as a heat sink? Or would I want to try to solder something to the backside, in order to gain more mass?
Captain Blight is offline  
Old 12-23-12, 01:56 PM
  #24  
RapidRobert
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 375
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Here's a pic taken in 1981 of my old Raleigh Sports with a big headlight from Bicycle Lighting Systems. It used a 6v sealed beam lamp that had a trapezoidal pattern. I think they were designed for scooters. Absolutely the best beam pattern I've ever seen for a bike headlight. The NiCd battery is in the water bottle holder on the seat tube. I still have two of the lamps. The housing was a typical 4" diameter piece typically seen on tractors and probably still available in the hardware store. Whoppin' huge amount of light for the time!

Attached Images
File Type: jpg
Raleigh on Porch.jpg (92.8 KB, 64 views)
RapidRobert is offline  
Old 12-23-12, 02:31 PM
  #25  
adventurepdx
Senior Member
 
adventurepdx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 960
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 22 Times in 17 Posts
Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
I have a B&M Classic (actually 3 of them) they put a solid pattern of light down and have the stand light too. My only issue is they are smaller than the 70's vintage chrome Raleigh headlights, roughly a third smaller and don't look quite right. I do use one on my Raleigh Twenty and it looks okay to me on that bike.
I've been using that B&M and I don't find it looks that out of place on my bike. It's a pretty decent light.

adventurepdx is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.