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Need help identifying this frame !! Lots of pics !!

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Need help identifying this frame !! Lots of pics !!

Old 03-07-13, 01:55 AM
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aquito
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Need help identifying this frame !! Lots of pics !!

So I was told this was my grandfather bike in the 70's and was passed down to my dad and now it's time for me to have it. I would like to know more about the frame and how good are the components. My dad said he thinks its an Atala frame but he is not sure. And said that all components where brought from Italy in the 70's. I have never heard of an Atala frame. So hopefully u guys can help me out












Last edited by aquito; 03-07-13 at 02:44 AM.
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Old 03-07-13, 01:56 AM
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Old 03-07-13, 06:39 AM
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Hey Aquito, quite a nice bike you have there. The cranks, rear derailer and shifters are campagnolo Nuovo Record - top flight stuff. The brakes are also nice in quality, though probably a little older, as is the front derailer. The bike was probably updated to newer (and maybe better) components. The wheels are also of very high quality, as are the other sundries (stem, bars, saddle).

Atala is a huge manufacturer, making everything from shopping bikes to high end racing stuff, maybe a more experienced member then myself can help you with the determination of the exact make and model.

Definitely a bike worthy of a full restoration!

Last edited by Italuminium; 03-07-13 at 06:48 AM.
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Old 03-07-13, 06:40 AM
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You might check the locknut of the hubs, which have a date stamp on the back side. Those brake levers kind of stand out, too modern for the other components. Those are some nice parts, I like it. Interested to see its beauty when it's all cleaned up...
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Old 03-07-13, 07:02 AM
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Simplex dropouts and Nervex bottom bracket lug would lead me to think the frame is French. I'm guessing it's a 60's bike that was upgraded with italian components in the 70s.
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Old 03-07-13, 07:18 AM
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I don't know much about Atala bikes, but I don't think I've ever seen one with Simplex dropouts and Nervex lugs. I think Atala used cheaper (but fancier looking) lugs and cheap dropouts, or Campy dropouts on the better bikes. jeirvine may be right about the frame being French; but not necessarily.

The seat post almost certainly has a size stamped on it, near the top, in back; 27.2 or 26.8 or 26.4 or something like that. This may tell us something.

Whatever it is, it is nice. All the components are top notch stuff. Ask your father if he has the brake levers-- these have been "upgraded" recently. I would prefer to find the old ones. But don't worry, if they are gone, suitable ones can be found.

Even the seat, which may look like a piece of cheap plastic to you, is a very nice one. Those sell for goodish sums on ebay.

It takes tubular tires. If you're not into racing bikes already, tubular tires may be more than you're willing to undertake. If you want to convert to clinchers, well, that's another discussion.
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Old 03-07-13, 08:31 AM
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Very nice old bike. Could be early to mid 60's. Can anyone speculate on what that "slot" looking thing on the drive side crank arm, in the flute, might be?
Bike could use some very careful cleaning and care.
Check out Atala here:
https://www.classicrendezvous.com/Italy/Atala.htm

Not near enough info though.
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Old 03-07-13, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
Very nice old bike. Could be early to mid 60's. Can anyone speculate on what that "slot" looking thing on the drive side crank arm, in the flute, might be?
Bike could use some very careful cleaning and care.
Check out Atala here:
https://www.classicrendezvous.com/Italy/Atala.htm

Not near enough info though.
I think that is a piece of reflective tape in the flute of the crank.
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Old 03-07-13, 08:53 AM
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French frame components and checkerboard decal on seat tube. Some smaller maker emulating Peugeot. Start with Sheldon Brown.

https://sheldonbrown.com/velos.html
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Old 03-07-13, 09:04 AM
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Maybe the stem is french size too, I find it rather odd an Ambrosio (Italian brand) comes engraved with a French text.
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Old 03-07-13, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by poke em View Post
I think that is a piece of reflective tape in the flute of the crank.
Ah. Right. Optical illusion, or, my eyes are shot. Thanks.
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Old 03-07-13, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Italuminium View Post
Maybe the stem is french size too, I find it rather odd an Ambrosio (Italian brand) comes engraved with a French text.
Good eye. Very unusual. Never seen that before.
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Old 03-07-13, 09:34 AM
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Definately French, the graphics remind me a little of one of the Motobecane or Gitane "B" lines: something like Astra or Anquetil or such. But it's not a "B" grade given the lugs, BB shell and components! Is the seat post 26.4 or 26.6? That might indicate DB 531 tubing.

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Old 03-07-13, 09:50 AM
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I think there's a good chance it really is an Atala.

The model line in 1975 was:

Corso
Giro D'Italia
Grand Prix
Competizione
Professional

Yours is older than that so it may not be any of those models but it could be either a Competizione (which means competition) or a Professional.

congratulations! Please let us help you get this back on the road, either by restoring it into like-original condition or just fixing it up, whichever you prefer. We can also help you decide. Please stick around and chronicle the transformation! And ultimately, we will want a ride report.

where are you?
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Old 03-07-13, 10:00 AM
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Nope^ not with Simplex and Nervex frame parts is that an Italian product. Probably older than '75, too.
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Old 03-07-13, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Italuminium View Post
Maybe the stem is french size too, I find it rather odd an Ambrosio (Italian brand) comes engraved with a French text.
Yes, a very good point.

The lower pump peg, and the crimped treatment of the seat stay tops, also strike me as distinctly French.
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Old 03-07-13, 10:20 AM
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Yeah, I'd go for french on this one. From a big factory too, given the elaborate SN. High end in any case.
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Old 03-07-13, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by rhm View Post
I don't know much about Atala bikes, but I don't think I've ever seen one with Simplex dropouts and Nervex lugs. I think Atala used cheaper (but fancier looking) lugs and cheap dropouts, or Campy dropouts on the better bikes. jeirvine may be right about the frame being French; but not necessarily.

The seat post almost certainly has a size stamped on it, near the top, in back; 27.2 or 26.8 or 26.4 or something like that. This may tell us something.

Whatever it is, it is nice. All the components are top notch stuff. Ask your father if he has the brake levers-- these have been "upgraded" recently. I would prefer to find the old ones. But don't worry, if they are gone, suitable ones can be found.

Even the seat, which may look like a piece of cheap plastic to you, is a very nice one. Those sell for goodish sums on ebay.

It takes tubular tires. If you're not into racing bikes already, tubular tires may be more than you're willing to undertake. If you want to convert to clinchers, well, that's another discussion.
So I'm curious about the tires. I would like to keep everything as original how he had it. The bike came with tires but they where unglued and had holes in them. Where could I find tires for this rims and how hard are to install?
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Old 03-07-13, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Italuminium View Post
Yeah, I'd go for french on this one. From a big factory too, given the elaborate SN. High end in any case.
if you refer to the numbers on the Nervex BB shell: they all do that. It's not a serial number but rather a Nervex part number that describes all the angles of the sockets in the shell in angles and minutes.
The fact that this has a Nervex BB shell (as well as what might be Nervex DuBois headlugs) does indeed point to a high quality frame.
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Old 03-07-13, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I think there's a good chance it really is an Atala.

The model line in 1975 was:

Corso
Giro D'Italia
Grand Prix
Competizione
Professional

Yours is older than that so it may not be any of those models but it could be either a Competizione (which means competition) or a Professional.

congratulations! Please let us help you get this back on the road, either by restoring it into like-original condition or just fixing it up, whichever you prefer. We can also help you decide. Please stick around and chronicle the transformation! And ultimately, we will want a ride report.

where are you?

Yea I would like to bring it back to original. I might have to change the brake levers. Will start by cleaning it completely. I'm moving soon so will be a project that will take some time jaja

Ohh and I'm in SoCal.
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Old 03-07-13, 11:16 AM
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Thanks for all the replies. So looks like my grandfather had good taste on bikes. He used to live in Spain so maybe frame is from there. Will try to bring this bike to life again and hopefully give it to one of my kids one day. Oldest is 3 so I will get to enjoy it for a while jaja
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Old 03-07-13, 11:29 AM
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No it's not from Spain. Trust me it's a very high end French frame / fork. If the Headset and Bottom bracket are Campy french threaded, they could be worth a lot of cash. Look around in here and see if you can find anything similar - https://www.classicrendezvous.com/France/France.html
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Old 03-07-13, 11:46 AM
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Originally Posted by aquito View Post
The bike came with tires but they where unglued and had holes in them. Where could I find tires for this rims and how hard are to install?
IMHO, the best value in tubular tires is Yellow jersey's "pair and a spare" for $50:

https://www.yellowjersey.org/tt.html

Get some glue while you're there. Tubulars generally aren't difficult to install, but it can be messy, particularly if you're inexperienced. It helps to stretch the tires on the rims for a while before gluing them down.

I'm surprised nobody's asked this yet: what's the threading on the bottom bracket shell and steer tube?
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Old 03-07-13, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
IMHO, the best value in tubular tires is Yellow jersey's "pair and a spare" for $50:

https://www.yellowjersey.org/tt.html

Get some glue while you're there. Tubulars generally aren't difficult to install, but it can be messy, particularly if you're inexperienced. It helps to stretch the tires on the rims for a while before gluing them down.

I'm surprised nobody's asked this yet: what's the threading on the bottom bracket shell and steer tube?
+1 on the tires,
You can go and splurge on the bike with something period correct and maybe made with silk carcasses, but if you will be riding it regularly, you might not find that practical as those tires, if you can find them will cost a mint, even in less that perfect condition....if you can find them. Just go with cost effective "representative" tires like the ones from Yellow Jersey as mentioned or others like Vittoria Rallies for now just to get your restoration going and make bigger decisions on you wheels later...but please make sure you get tires with tan sidewalls. Black sidewalled sewup tires will ruin/cheapen the looks of that classic bike IMO.
As for cleaning the rims, really old dried p glue is easy to remove with a Dremel with a small rotary brush bit. I usually try to use a brush bit with softer brass bristles, but I found out that rims are pretty tolerant to the steel bristled brushes too. If the glue is totally dried up like amber, it will come right off in a cloud of dust (remember to use a dust mask as the glue dust might be toxic) when you hit it with the Dremel. Just don't be heavy handed with it and your rims should turn out OK. and only use it on the areas where there will be glue as the brush might still scratch the more polished surfaces of the rims.

Good luck and keep us posted on the restoration of your Grandfather's mystery bike.

Chombi
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Old 03-07-13, 02:53 PM
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Get some of these acid brushes to apply the glue. It's nearly impossible to get it cleanly off anything, so you just throw the brush away after use.
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