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Living In Japan with a Schwinn Continental in the mail!

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Living In Japan with a Schwinn Continental in the mail!

Old 05-14-13, 08:30 PM
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TokyoZack
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haha i thought the same thing when i saw YELLOW CORN. why and what does that have to do with motorcycling lol.
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Old 05-15-13, 12:19 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by TokyoZack View Post
"P39 Clowns" is a high end vintage shop in Tokyo who sell lots of bikes. They also sell furniture and antiques. Prices for Vintage american products in Japan cant be compared with a bicycle shop in Wisconsin.
I understand. I've sold some vintage parts via ebay to buyers in Japan who were willing to pay the most, so I know there are buyers there that value nice vintage bikes and parts. My main point was that just because someone lists something for a certain price on the internet (or in a high-end vintage store), it doesn't necessarily mean it will sell for that price. But in this case, maybe they are, stranger things have happened.

Regardless, good luck with your project, it should make a good townie bike. They're supposed to be pretty indestructible, so hopefully even with little maintenance and minimal upgrades you should be able to get a lot of use out of it.

I love Japanese bikes, so I would probably be digging around over there trying to find a nice Japanese-market Miyata or Panasonic or something handmade/more exotic that hasn't made it stateside. I'm hoping to visit Japan for a few weeks later in the year but I probably won't be coming home with a new bike (I've said that before..).
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Old 05-15-13, 03:38 AM
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Im also trying to search for a cool japanese exotic bike on Yahoo Auctions. Do you know any good resources/information on what brands i should keep an eye out for? I'm just getting into the vintage side of things so learning the brands and which company's made QUALITY bikes are so on.
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Old 05-16-13, 08:23 PM
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The Varsities and Continentals have extremely layed back frame angles, which makes the bikes feel quite short front-to-rear.

Result is that a rider will not enjoy taking on hills with one.

But it does help if the rider is long-legged and chooses the largest frame that they can "comfortably" straddle.

I went 700c on one of mine, and then almost got carried away.
I wonder what this would be worth in Japan?

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Old 05-17-13, 06:39 AM
  #30  
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Almost carried away? Goodness, man, what were you thinking? And what does it weigh?
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Old 05-18-13, 09:52 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Almost carried away? Goodness, man, what were you thinking? And what does it weigh?
Im also curious on the weight of it. The varsity and continental frames are about the same right?

I did my first real ride today on my Cannondale CAAD9. Its light as a feather but I was still dying on our 5,000ft of combined climbing over 53miles round trip. Now i'm terrified to even attempt to take the Continental to the mountains.
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Old 05-18-13, 10:22 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by TokyoZack View Post
Im also curious on the weight of it. The varsity and continental frames are about the same right?

I did my first real ride today on my Cannondale CAAD9. Its light as a feather but I was still dying on our 5,000ft of combined climbing over 53miles round trip. Now i'm terrified to even attempt to take the Continental to the mountains.
Don't quote me on this, but I think the fork is different. I believe the Continental has a tubular fork and the varsity has a cheaper solid blade fork. I had a suburban, which is very similar to a continental. People on this thread may not ooh and awe at them, but it was a really nice bike.
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Old 05-18-13, 10:42 AM
  #33  
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Being a rare and unusual American piece of iron, it may sell as a collector's piece. But given the size to fit you, it will also not fit the average Japanese rider and that's going to cut out a lot of potential buyers who wish to ride said bike.

I wouldn't personally invest in a Schwinn of this level as a personal rider, and definitely wouldn't attempt any mountainous rides on one. Unless you have Lance's physician to write you prescriptions.
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Old 05-18-13, 12:49 PM
  #34  
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The lime-green varsity now is at 32 pounds even, with kickstand and with the forged steel fork and crank.

Believe it or not, the Continental and even Supersport framesets seem to weigh roughly only 1 pound less than same-sized Varsity, and all have the heavy crank and kickstand.

The Supersport will comparatively kick ass on the others though, if only because of it's 3-degree steeper frame angles that allow for a much more aggressive rider position that allows both a better climbing position and more aerodynamic tuck.

The Varsity and Continental frame angles will not allow use of a stem length over 9cm without causing the steering to go floppy, whereas the Supersport's geometry allows use of a 110mm stem length while retaining neutral handling under all conditions.

The original Varsity sidepull calipers worked well once I added the long, thin, stiff brake pads. Regular Matthauser pads were too squishy.

I reversed the saddle clamp and fitted a 100mm neck (110mm proved dangerous) to get as far foreward as possible, but it's still a high-effort proposition to attack steep hills on this out of the saddle.

My SuperSports weigh about as much as this one but I can easily crank out a fast 50-miler on them versus this Varsity

If the Varsity frame were 2 sizes larger (at the very limit of crotch clearance) it would be a LOT better fit for me. Let those Japanese market riders know this, that Varsity and Continental frames need to be be fitted as large as possible for aggressive riding.

My larger ~60cm Varsity is nearly stock and weighs about 39 pounds. I can kick out 50 hilly miles on it, but that does leave me comfortably worn out.
If I ride it every day I soon get used to the feel of it, but it does provide a much-enhanced workout.

I love it when riders ask what it weighs, especially after a hard, fast ride.
I let them pick it up, and usually the wheels don't even come off the ground on the first try.
The look on their face.... ...PRICELESS.
Usual quote: "That thing weighs a TON."

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Old 05-18-13, 12:54 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by mkeller234 View Post
Don't quote me on this, but I think the fork is different. I believe the Continental has a tubular fork and the varsity has a cheaper solid blade fork.
You are correct. The Varsity had sidepull brakes and the Continental had centerpulls. Besides the forks and the brakes, I don't know other differences. There were probably a few other minor differences. Maybe the Continental had an aluminum stem or something like that. The Varsity stem-and-handlebar combination weighed almost as much as a bike should weigh.
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Old 05-18-13, 05:27 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
Believe it or not, the Continental and even Supersport framesets seem to weigh roughly only 1 pound less than same-sized Varsity...
To be more precise a Super Sport frame and fork is about 2.5lbs less than an equivelant sized Varsity and 1.5lbs less than an equivelant sized Continental. The 1lb difference is due to the forged fork on the Varsity.

Originally Posted by noglider View Post
The Varsity had sidepull brakes and the Continental had centerpulls. Besides the forks and the brakes, I don't know other differences.
In addition to the tubular fork and center-pull brakes the Continental also had an alloy stem, alloy randonneur handlebars, alloy bodied pedals, and quick-release hubs (most years). Not to mention it was only $14 more during the early to mid-'70s (~$117 vs. ~$103), well worth the difference in price IMHO.

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Old 05-18-13, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Metacortex View Post
To be more precise a Super Sport frame and fork is about 2.5lbs less than an equivelant sized Varsity and 1.5lbs less than an equivelant sized Continental. The 1lb difference is due to the forged fork on the Varsity.
...In addition to the tubular fork and center-pull brakes the Continental also had an alloy stem, alloy randonneur handlebars, alloy bodied pedals, and quick-release hubs (most years). Not to mention it was only $14 more during the early to mid-'70s (~$117 vs. ~$103), well worth the difference in price IMHO.
At least with the earlier bikes, Continentals had 750g (each, bare) French Chrolux steel rims, while the Varsity had 1150g (each, bare) Schwinn steel rims.

I'm surprised the bare SuperSport frame weighs even one pound less than a Varsity/Continental frame. They're tanks!

You're right about the calipers, you'd have to go back to 1962 to find a Continental with sidepulls.

And, at least during most of the 60's, the stems were 22.2mm alloy, made in france, even on the Varsity.
Actually, the stems measured 22.0mm, but plugged into 22.2mm steerers!
The heavy twin-stick shifters arrived around '67, with the aux brake levers added 2 years later.

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Old 05-18-13, 08:26 PM
  #38  
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Those shifters were one component that was worth the weight penalty. I've ridden these tanks. I appreciate them for what they are but they're not my taste.
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Old 05-18-13, 09:12 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by TokyoZack View Post
I did my first real ride today on my Cannondale CAAD9. Its light as a feather but I was still dying on our 5,000ft of combined climbing over 53miles round trip. Now i'm terrified to even attempt to take the Continental to the mountains.
Suck it up, I know a guy who rode almost the same route on 75 GI, on an all steel fixed gear! I did 5500', so you were probably in the 6000' range buddy

When is it gonna get here?!
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Old 05-19-13, 12:50 AM
  #40  
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lol a 500ft difference. Bull****. Next time your going to the top whether you like it or not(most likely walking). If i could have looked down from the top to where you gave up, you would have been a tiny spec. ALOT more than 500ft...

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Old 05-19-13, 04:29 AM
  #41  
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Uttttt Ohhhh!!!! C&V has found some trash talking Tokyo boys feeling their comeuppance (as in come up to the top of this big ole mountain)!

I've not weighed in but have been following your Continental's sojourn to Japan. Zack I wish you the best on this project and hope it all comes together nicely! I have a good collection of Schwinn spare parts so let me know if you need anything.
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Old 05-19-13, 09:41 AM
  #42  
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I thought Continentals had Quick Release levers while Varsities did not. However I have seem Continentals with Mixed QR, and Bolted Axles.
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Old 05-19-13, 09:50 AM
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The Continental had quick-release front and rear hubs from '63 through '75. For '76 only it reverted to bolt-on hubs (same as the Varsity). In '77 it was renamed the Sierra and had a quick-release front and bolt-on rear. It continued with QR front/bolt-on rear hubs until the end of production in '84. Note that the name was changed from Sierra to "Continental II" for '79-'80 and finally back to just "Continental" (no II) for '80-'84.
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Old 05-19-13, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd View Post
I'm surprised the bare SuperSport frame weighs even one pound less than a Varsity/Continental frame. They're tanks!
My 24" Super Sport frame (no headset, no BB cups, no kickstand) weighs 7.05 pounds and the fork weighs 1.96 pounds. Built up with 36h Open Pro 700c alloy rims, Campy Record hubs, 10-s Ergo shifters, Campy Comp Triple group, alloy threadless stem adapter and stem, handlebar, seatpost, Brooks Pro saddle, and Tektro brakes the bike weighs 26.4 pounds ready to ride. It's purpose built for climbing with 30/42/50t chainrings and IRD 12-32 10-s cassette.
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Old 05-19-13, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Scooper View Post
the bike weighs 26.4 pounds ready to ride.
That is impressive for such a stout frame.

Any pictures to drool over.
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Old 05-19-13, 06:54 PM
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Originally Posted by 2112YYZ View Post
That is impressive for such a stout frame.

Any pictures to drool over.
Yep.

Scooper's 1973 Schwinn Super Sport

Pastor Bob did essentially the same thing with his Super Sport (Sporty), although his paint job puts mine to shame.
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Old 05-19-13, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Scooper View Post
Yep.

Scooper's 1973 Schwinn Super Sport

Pastor Bob did essentially the same thing with his Super Sport (Sporty), although his paint job puts mine to shame.
Very Nicely updated. At a quick glance, you'd think 80's Paramount.
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Old 05-19-13, 09:12 PM
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Originally Posted by 2112YYZ View Post
Very Nicely updated. At a quick glance, you'd think 80's Paramount.
It's interesting you say that.

My 1987 62cm Paramount (Columbus SL/SP) frame weighs 5.1 pounds and the fork weighs 1.8 pounds (no headset or BB cups). With 7-s Dura-Ace group and Brooks Professional saddle, the weight of the Paramount is 24.6 pounds, ready to ride.

Fourteen years separate the '73 Super Sport from the '87 Paramount, but with the modern components and wide gear range on the SS it's a much more capable bike than the Paramount. The weight penalty is only 1.8 pounds.
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Old 05-19-13, 10:11 PM
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Maybe if a guy was really dedicated, He could acid wash the inside of the frame to drop some weight, not that it sounds like it is needed.

Amazing that the components would make such a dramatic difference. I am guessing a lot of people get hung up on the weight of the frame. I admit I did.
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Old 05-20-13, 03:37 AM
  #50  
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lots of good info filling up here! I love it. My bike should be here in another week or so. Fingers crossed. APO shipping is semi-unpredictable.
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