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128mm to 126mm hub; was I too anxious?

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128mm to 126mm hub; was I too anxious?

Old 01-21-14, 06:36 AM
  #1  
Gdando
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128mm to 126mm hub; was I too anxious?

I fear that my inexperience and over eagerness may have created an inconvenience. I was so eager to find some nice record hubs for the Campy record strada hoops that I found locally that I overlooked the fact that they are 128s. Is this a show stopper or is it simply a matter of swapping out the spacer?
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Old 01-21-14, 06:46 AM
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The rear spacing is 126 mm and the hubs are spaced at 128 mm and you haven't built the wheels? Piece of cake. You can remove 2 1mm spacers and build the wheel. Or, assuming your bike is steel, you could leave it as is. More than a few steel bikes are built with a 128 mm rear so they can accommodate either a 126 or a 130mm rear wheel.
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Old 01-21-14, 06:51 AM
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Bikemig,
Thank you. The rear spacing is 126mm and the hubs are a stated 128mm. The wheels a planned to be built once the hubs arrive here in Sicily. I am finding that being overly eager and a newbie is a dangerous combination.
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Old 01-21-14, 07:21 AM
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Which measurement is 128? Over the lock nuts , or length of the axle?

I think you'll be fine, either way.

Last edited by rootboy; 01-21-14 at 05:45 PM.
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Old 01-21-14, 07:22 AM
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A 1mm spread on each side is no problem for steel. That should pop right in. If you're really worried, you can set it and align the dropouts. Aligning dropouts isn't a bad idea, in general. I've yet to find a bike that the dropouts were correct.
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Old 01-21-14, 04:55 PM
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just mount it, 2mm is nothing to be concerned with
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Old 01-21-14, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
Which measurement is 128? Over the lock nuts , or length of the axel?

I think you'll be fine, either way.
It was OLN. He is getting the hubs from me. If I had known, I could have respaced them for him but they are already in the mail. If you remove a spacer, it is probably going to drop you down to 124mm. As indicated by others, 1mm each side is not big issue. I would leave them as is.

Gene, if you cannot resolve it, you can return them.
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Last edited by CV-6; 01-21-14 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 01-22-14, 02:50 AM
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Lynn,
I am grateful for the offer however it was I who was too eager to read the fine print. I would however be honored if you could walk me through the process of re-spacing. Although I am a newbie and making many mistakes along the way I am enjoying the CV experience and would like to learn. Thank you once again.
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Old 01-22-14, 05:17 AM
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As these guys are telling you, the spacing relative to the frame is not a problem. But it is worthwhile for you to learn to measure the over-locknut-distance (OLD) and the frame spacing between the dropouts. I don't doubt that CV6 delivered what he says he did, but in general it's not hard to check it for yourself, and not all sellers know what they are selling.

But there might be a real problem, clearance between the chain and the frame when the bike is finished and the wheel installed. The chain might grind away at the frame when it is in the smallest rear cog. Some 7-speed freewheels have the same cog to cog spacing as a vintage 5-speed, and with a wide (5-speed or 7-speed) chain might need extra space between the freewheel and the dropout. This has something to do with how the dropout attachment was finished on the inner face of the dropout. You really can't see if you WILL have this problem until the whole wheel is assembled and on the frame, and you take it out riding.

I would not test it before you build up the wheel, because if you install the freewheel without a rim, it can be really, REALLY hard to generate enough force to unscrew it from the bare hub.
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Old 01-22-14, 05:34 AM
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Just mount the suckers as said the nice part of about these hubs is they will accept an older 7 maybe even 8 speed Freewheel.
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Old 01-22-14, 06:07 AM
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Road Fan, and Zukahn1,
Thank you for the guidance. The irony is despite reading post about not getting caught up in the excitement I have done so twice. My original 13-23 Regina freewheel is going in for now however someday I would like to have Pasterbob rebuild it with a 13-28t but that will depend on how L’Erioca del Sud in Sicily goes this year.

I can only ascertain that this is part of the learning process that many of you have already conquered. I need to keep reminding myself that after the new wheels are built and mounted to not buy anything else but simply shut-up and ride.

Last edited by Gdando; 01-22-14 at 06:11 AM.
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Old 01-22-14, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Gdando View Post
I need to keep reminding myself ... to not buy anything else but simply shut-up and ride.
Out of the mouths of babes oft times come gems.

/
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Old 01-22-14, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Gdando View Post
Road Fan, and Zukahn1,
Thank you for the guidance. The irony is despite reading post about not getting caught up in the excitement I have done so twice. My original 13-23 Regina freewheel is going in for now however someday I would like to have Pasterbob rebuild it with a 13-28t but that will depend on how L’Erioca del Sud in Sicily goes this year.

I can only ascertain that this is part of the learning process that many of you have already conquered. I need to keep reminding myself that after the new wheels are built and mounted to not buy anything else but simply shut-up and ride.
You know when you do the L'Eroica del Sud you will have to provide photos and a ride report.
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Old 01-22-14, 01:07 PM
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The best way to do this that I can think of is to first decide how wide of a freewheel (maximum width) that you will be wanting to use.

I would do this with any hub, regardless of whether it was stock or modified in terms of spacing or in terms of whether you wanted it to be.

Then you should lubricate the threads and lightly screw on that freewheel until it lightly bottoms. You'll need a tool to remove it, but hand torque should be enough to hold the hubshell from turning.

You'll likely need only 3.5-4.5mm of clearance from the outer face of the small cog out to the inside face of the dropout (i.e. out to the toothed face of the locknut).
Give consideration to the ends of the stays, how they may bulge inward, relative to the diameter of the chosen sprocket. 14t and larger smallest sprockets sometimes require more clearance.

Next, assemble the axle so that no excess of driveside locknut protrudes more than the necessary 3.5-4.5mm out beyond the face of the small sprocket, then assemble the axle to achieve the desired overall over-locknut spacing to match the frame.
After lubing the bearings, and during final assembly, then also make sure your axle protrusion from the locknut faces is equal on both sides and is between 3 and 5mm on each side, so as to fully engage the dropout slots while also allowing clearance inside the QR head (and inside the QR nut) for the compressed cone springs against the ends of the axle itself.

Then build your wheel, which is the bigger challenge for a newby.

A shorter axle extension on the drive-side makes for a more bend-resisting axle, and likely will improve chainline as well.

Your choice of chain, whether old-style or modern, will determine the relative amount of clearance within the 3.5-4.5mm range that I mentioned above.

Lastly, all QR-style hubs should be adjusted for a discernable amount of freeplay, such that this freeplay disappears as the QR is clamped onto the frame's dropouts, which compresses the axle measurably. Normally, this is about 1/8 of a turn away from a snug adjustment of the bearings.
This can prevent premature damage to the axle bearings, particularly when higher-quality QR's and higher lever forces are employed.

Last edited by dddd; 01-22-14 at 03:18 PM.
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