Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

C&V general purpose tools

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

C&V general purpose tools

Old 03-03-14, 04:36 PM
  #1  
Chip seal rocks
Thread Starter
 
Howard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 213
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
C&V general purpose tools

Was reading one of the Cannondale threads where the OP mentioned being confused about what kind of tool kit to buy.
My own set has evolved over the last several years, and is small enough to carry on a relatively modern road bike and useful enough for an old Schwinn, Raleigh, or what have you.
Here's what I have
1) an old C'dale tire sock - the seat bag they made for carrying spare tubulars.
Main compartment:
2) 6-8" adjustable wrench (a good one. NEVER skimp on one of these, otherwise it's just another nut rounder)
3) Shorty pump with both presta and schrader heads. Duct tape wrapped around the pump handle. Can be used to boot a tire among other things.
Side pocket:
4) Set of hex keys 2-6MM (or whatever the small Park set has)
5) a shorty 15mm combo wrench (Probably redundant. an 8mm and 10mm might be better choices)
Other side pocket:
6) decent quality multitool. Pliers, knife, flat & phillips screwdrivers at a minimum.
7) one or two patch kits. Some miscellaneous 3-5mm nuts & bolts, plus I think there's an axle nut in there.
8) set of 3 nylon tire levers. Or 2 nylon and one steel. Really, at least two levers.

Occasionally I'll have some electrical tape & a spare bulb (halogen, vintage headlight).

The "tubular sock" fits in most bags, the internal pockets of a number of jackets, or a bottle cage if need be. I try to keep an extra tube with the bike or fit it in the other jacket pocket - something that only really works about 6 months out of the year.

Last edited by Howard; 03-03-14 at 04:37 PM. Reason: forgot levers.
Howard is offline  
Old 03-03-14, 06:43 PM
  #2  
Banned.
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27,199
Liked 1,414 Times in 913 Posts
5mm hex key, spare tubular or tube, 1 tire lever, 2 patches if riding clinchers.
I have the Cannondale tubular sock and a Cinelli replica, or I use a variety of bags.
Air-wise: frame pumps on C&V, CO2 and adapter on modern.
RobbieTunes is offline  
Old 03-03-14, 07:20 PM
  #3  
smelling the roses
 
seedsbelize's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tixkokob, Yucatán, México
Posts: 15,320

Bikes: 79 Trek 930, 80 Trek 414, 84 Schwinn Letour Luxe (coupled), 92 Schwinn Paramount PDG 5

Liked 901 Times in 612 Posts
I carry a fanny pack with, at least: ancient Park tool kit, tire levers, patch kit, two spare tubes (and sometimes a spare tire), chain tool, snacks, spoke wrench, flashlight, needle nose pliers, mini vise grip, pocket knife, zip ties, dry paper towels for wiping my glasses, pressure guage, presta/schrader adapter. And a frame mounted pump. I really don't like to get stranded. I'm sure there's more in there at any given time.
__________________
Originally Posted by Bah Humbug
Auto-pause is a honey-tongued devil whispering sweet lies in your ear.


seedsbelize is offline  
Old 03-03-14, 07:30 PM
  #4  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Leatherman tool, small adjustable wrench, tire irons, spare tube, patch kit and Topeak Morph pump. On my more modern bikes I will toss my Park Tool MTB-3 in the bag.

I use saddle bags or rack top bags for about 99% of my riding.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 03-03-14, 07:36 PM
  #5  
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Stillwater, OK
Posts: 7,831
Liked 699 Times in 471 Posts
Oh man, this is definitely not the thread for me. I can't believe how much stuff you guys take with you. Seriously, I'm shocked. And did I just read the words "Fanny pack"?
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2019 Salsa Warbird
shoota is offline  
Old 03-03-14, 07:40 PM
  #6  
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 21,860

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Liked 1,375 Times in 866 Posts
My elder son gave me a bright yellow Camelback Mule a couple of years ago for Fathers' Day. It has great pockets for the sorts of tools already mentioned in this thread. Since I already have one or two water bottles on most of my bikes, I use it more as a general purpose backpack than as a hydration source, but the latter function is great for hiking. I carry both glue and non-glue patches in addition to a spare innertube and a tire pump and set of tire levers. In the old days I used to carry spare spokes, chain links, cables -- all sorts of stuff, but breakdowns seem much less frequent now.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 03-03-14, 08:36 PM
  #7  
Chip seal rocks
Thread Starter
 
Howard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 213
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wahoonc
Leatherman tool, small adjustable wrench, tire irons, spare tube, patch kit and Topeak Morph pump. On my more modern bikes I will toss my Park Tool MTB-3 in the bag.

I use saddle bags or rack top bags for about 99% of my riding.

Aaron
Other than cotters, you can just about take a Raleigh down to the bearings with this. Genius.
After thinking about it a little, I'm pretty sure all the things I listed have been used at least as much on other people's bikes as they have on my own, at least during group rides.
Howard is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 05:33 AM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
OldsCOOL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: northern michigan
Posts: 13,319

Bikes: '77 Colnago Super, '76 Fuji The Finest, '88 Cannondale Criterium, '86 Trek 760, '87 Miyata 712

Liked 601 Times in 314 Posts
Is that pack for Rando's? How much does it weigh??
OldsCOOL is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 06:06 AM
  #9  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by Howard
Other than cotters, you can just about take a Raleigh down to the bearings with this. Genius.
After thinking about it a little, I'm pretty sure all the things I listed have been used at least as much on other people's bikes as they have on my own, at least during group rides.
Have to tell a funny story... I had my Banjo Brothers racktop bag mounted on my Raleigh Twenty. I was riding a bike trail out in Iowa, came up on a couple walking their bikes. The fellow had a flat tire and the tube was damaged bad enough that it could not be fixed, he had a patch kit. I offered him my "spare" tube, his look was kind of incredulous thinking that a 20" tube would fit on a 700c hybrid. however I knew I had 700c tubes because I had just picked up a couple at the LBS earlier that day.

My tools seem to be used to fix other people's bikes more than my own much of the time too.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 07:10 AM
  #10  
weapons-grade bolognium
 
thinktubes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Across the street from Chicago
Posts: 6,381

Bikes: Battaglin Cromor, Ciocc Designer 84, Schwinn Superior 1981

Liked 2,470 Times in 917 Posts
2 tire levers, a couple of hex wrenches, spare tube, and a battered Zefal HP.
thinktubes is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 07:52 AM
  #11  
Senior Member
 
Michael Angelo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Hurricane Alley , Florida
Posts: 3,904

Bikes: Treks (USA), Schwinn Paramount, Schwinn letour,Raleigh Team Professional, Gazelle GoldLine Racing, 2 Super Mondias, Carlton Professional.

Liked 32 Times in 23 Posts
Taxi money....
Michael Angelo is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 08:22 AM
  #12  
car dodger
 
norskagent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: garner/raleigh nc
Posts: 3,440
Liked 147 Times in 61 Posts
park multi tool

park tire boot
tube patches
levers
topeak or lyzyne mini pump
cell phone
All fits in a small saddlebag, except the mini pump
__________________
1989 Schwinn Paramount OS
1980 Mclean/Silk Hope Sport Touring
1983 Bianchi pista
1976 Fuji Feather track
1979 raleigh track
"I've consulted my sources and I'm pretty sure your derailleur does not exist"
norskagent is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 08:27 AM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
OldsCOOL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: northern michigan
Posts: 13,319

Bikes: '77 Colnago Super, '76 Fuji The Finest, '88 Cannondale Criterium, '86 Trek 760, '87 Miyata 712

Liked 601 Times in 314 Posts
Dont forget the spoke tool and cone wrenches.
OldsCOOL is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 08:27 AM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Paramount1973's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: The First State.
Posts: 1,168

Bikes: Schwinn Continental, Schwinn Paramount, Schwinn High Plains, Schwinn World Sport, Trek 420, Trek 930,Trek 660, Novara X-R, Giant Iguana. Fuji Sagres mixte.

Liked 22 Times in 10 Posts
A saddlebag per bike with short hex wrenches that fit the bolts on that bike. The wrenches come off of Harbor Freight keyfob type sets. A small phillips head screwdriver. Spare tube and a Park patch kit. CO2 cylinder or two and a Portland Design Works 'Shiny Object' valve head (tiny, light and works great). Spoke wrench. Tire irons. Otherwise, I carry a regular Swiss Army knife, and have a mini-Victorinox Swiss Army knife on my keychain. I need to add something for boot material.

Last edited by Paramount1973; 03-04-14 at 07:05 PM.
Paramount1973 is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 08:35 AM
  #15  
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,438

Bikes: 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Liked 658 Times in 235 Posts
I'm surprised at all the stuff some riders carry. What good are all those tools without a supply of spare parts?

But seriously, I usually carry just tire irons (tire plastics or tire aluminums, since they aren't really iron), a patch kit, a spare tube, and frame pump of course. (Also cell phone, and wallet for emergency funds and ID, of course.) On the tandem we also carry a small screwdriver. The tool pouch may have a 4" adjustable wrench too, but I don't recall.

I can count on one hand the number of times I've had a problem which required tools, not counting flat tires.

One time the quick-link on the Masi's chain came apart. I could have used a chain tool for that but a spare quick-link would have fixed it too. (Memo to self: Throw quick-link in the bag.) A local cyclist who lived nearby lent me a chain tool. (Thanks, Peter.)

One time the tandem's FD cable broke. I could have left it on the small ring, but instead I adjusted the stop screw to hold it on the middle ring.

Once a DS bearing cup came loose on the tandem's stoker crank. What the heck? How'd that happen? I just repacked it 600 miles ago. Fortunately I could tighten it by hand and it unscrewed slowly enough that we covered the 5 miles or so to a bike shop (Ride Studio in Lexington). They let me use an 8mm hex wrench to pull the crank arm, and a whopping big adjustable wrench to tighten the cup. (Thank you, RS! Nice folks, they are.)

I've pumped up other people's tires more often than I've pumped up my own. We broke a spoke or two on the tandem before I rebuilt the rear wheel. Other than this sort of stuff, a well-maintained bike shouldn't normally have things break on the road.

Or maybe Ive just been lucky.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 08:46 AM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
SJX426's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Fredericksburg, Va
Posts: 9,635

Bikes: '65 Frejus TDF, '73 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, '83 Colnago Superissimo, '84 Trek 610, '84 Trek 760, '88 Pinarello Veneto, '88 De Rosa Pro, '89 Pinarello Montello, '94 Burley Duet, 97 Specialized RockHopper, 2010 Langster, Tern Link D8

Liked 2,263 Times in 1,129 Posts
Tubular (pre glued) in a spent white sock with 1 tire iron (plastic), maybe a 7mm Allen for the seat post or stem. Cell phone. One big water bottle. Frame pump (Silca). This works for up to a 50 mile ride on the Colnago.

I've been thinking about custom tool kits for specific bikes. The tandem will require a 10mm, 15mm 7/16" box wrenchs, 5 and 7mm allens, spare tube, tire irons, tire patch kit, and a frame pump (Zephal HP). May need to include a chain breaker. Also a spare power source (Stoker).

My commuter has tube, irons, 5 & 7mm Allen, Leatherman, tire patch kit and a small Topeak pump. Missing something....

All have a tail lights and computers. The Colnago rides do not have a headlight (flashlight) but the others do. The commuter has a storage bottle that fits in the second WB Cage to store the computer and lights during lockup at work.

Last edited by SJX426; 03-04-14 at 08:53 AM.
SJX426 is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 10:42 AM
  #17  
Senior Member
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 4,615

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte, Peu Dolomites

Liked 1,726 Times in 1,109 Posts
Nice thread - Seems it all depends on how far and how isolated you ride - Its not bad if your just 10 miles out on civilized roads where a cell phone can get you picked up and rescued...

And another being out in the back woods on remotely travelled paths with animals wild or human... (wondering if you should have packed that .357 wrench)

Its and ongoing challenge - Thats why I still find these tool pouch lists so interesting - Every now and then I'll pick up a note that allows me to remove or add something to mine...

See My post #84 for pics
https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...zandoval+tools
zandoval is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 11:36 AM
  #18  
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,855

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Originally Posted by zandoval
Nice thread - Seems it all depends on how far and how isolated you ride - Its not bad if your just 10 miles out on civilized roads where a cell phone can get you picked up and rescued...

And another being out in the back woods on remotely travelled paths with animals wild or human... (wondering if you should have packed that .357 wrench)

Its and ongoing challenge - Thats why I still find these tool pouch lists so interesting - Every now and then I'll pick up a note that allows me to remove or add something to mine...

See My post #84 for pics
https://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...zandoval+tools
I like my compact .380...

I live a loooooong ways from an LBS and even further from taxi/mass transit service. So I have to be relatively independent. I seldom have full blown mechanical break downs on my bikes, but want to be reasonably prepared to get myself home if he need arises. I have headed out on a Saturday ride and been gone for up to 12 hours because the weather was nice and I was enjoying the ride.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 11:51 AM
  #19  
Senior Member
 
Bledfor Days's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Port Moody BC Canada
Posts: 124

Bikes: Vintage cheapies and some modern stuff.

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I carry a Park multi tool and junk in a pair of Russian 7.62x54 ammo pouches. They attach to a rack easily and will fit into tabs on back of most saddles if you trim the straps a bit. You can get them for cheap at any surplus store or if you buy a Russian surplus rifle. Hi hi.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
20140210_171214.jpg (94.3 KB, 20 views)
Bledfor Days is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 12:35 PM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Posts: 4,615

Bikes: Univega, Peu P6, Peu PR-10, Ted Williams, Peu UO-8, Peu UO-18 Mixte, Peu Dolomites

Liked 1,726 Times in 1,109 Posts
Originally Posted by Bledfor Days
... Russian 7.62x54 ammo pouches.
Hey - They look nice and vintage too - I'm going to look further into this - Thanks...
zandoval is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 12:46 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
 
Bledfor Days's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Port Moody BC Canada
Posts: 124

Bikes: Vintage cheapies and some modern stuff.

Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Ha ha. They are vintage 1940's. They look great and match the Brooks saddle. Waterproof too.
Bledfor Days is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 12:47 PM
  #22  
Reeks of aged cotton duck
 
Hydrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Middle Georgia, USA
Posts: 1,176

Bikes: 2008 Kogswell PR mkII, 1976 Raleigh Professional, 1996 Serotta Atlanta, 1984 Trek 520, 1979 Raleigh Comp GS

Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by shoota
And did I just read the words "Fanny pack"?
This made me spit coffee on my keyboard!

I'm as nerdy as they come... 30 years of being an engineer will do that to you...

And even I won't do a fanny pack!

I'm just messing with you, Belize... I'm also into being prepared!
Hydrated is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 12:56 PM
  #23  
Senior Member
 
shoota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Stillwater, OK
Posts: 7,831
Liked 699 Times in 471 Posts
Originally Posted by Hydrated
This made me spit coffee on my keyboard!

I'm as nerdy as they come... 30 years of being an engineer will do that to you...

And even I won't do a fanny pack!

I'm just messing with you, Belize... I'm also into being prepared!
As an engineer in training, I refuse to let myself get too nerdy. I've already been told by my buddies that posting on forums is nerdy so I maybe I'm headed down the wrong path anyways lol. Who cares.. I love it here.
__________________
2014 Cannondale SuperSix EVO 2
2019 Salsa Warbird
shoota is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 01:04 PM
  #24  
Reeks of aged cotton duck
 
Hydrated's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Middle Georgia, USA
Posts: 1,176

Bikes: 2008 Kogswell PR mkII, 1976 Raleigh Professional, 1996 Serotta Atlanta, 1984 Trek 520, 1979 Raleigh Comp GS

Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
Originally Posted by shoota
As an engineer in training, I refuse to let myself get too nerdy. I've already been told by my buddies that posting on forums is nerdy so I maybe I'm headed down the wrong path anyways lol. Who cares.. I love it here.
You can try to resist the nerdiness all you want... it is hopeless.

Come to the dark side. We have bacon.
Hydrated is offline  
Old 03-04-14, 01:08 PM
  #25  
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,438

Bikes: 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Liked 658 Times in 235 Posts
I are a enjuneer and I do wear a fanny pack sometimes. But it isn't because I want to be nerdy; I don't give a dang whether I look knurdie or knot. It's because sometimes I wear clothes which have no pocket for a wallet. Carrying a wallet is good, I've found. I wouldn't wear one on a bike though.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Your Privacy Choices -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.