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Tools needed for a restoration?

Old 07-26-14, 07:07 AM
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Tools needed for a restoration?

I'm not new to working on bikes, but I am new to working on them the 'proper' way. Such as having the right tool to pull a bottom bracket apart and not using channel locks....

So, I picked up a mid-60's road bike off the curb and my original intent was to slap some tires on it and ride around since it was a Sears bike. I'm new to the cycling community and didn't know the Weinmann brakes and Campy dérailleurs were special things. Now this has become a restoration job, if anything just for fun, I know this isn't a big money bike.

I work on my own cars so I have a full set of mechanics tools, standard and metric, so I'm good there. What are some of the special tools I will need and how do I go about identifying which one to get? I would assume that not every wrench used for pull apart the crank fits every crank/bottom bracket...

Thanks in advance and please be patient, I'm not quite 'hip to the lingo' on bikes yet.
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Old 07-26-14, 07:15 AM
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For step by step guidance for procedures and tools, sheldonbrown.com and parktools.com
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Old 07-26-14, 07:22 AM
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Park Tool Co. » Park Tool Co.

This is also very helpful, Park Tool Co. » ParkTool Blog

What I use the most is a pedal wrench, a bottom bracket wrench (you are correct, these tend to be specific per bottom bracket), cone wrenches for working on hubs, metric allen set (more for modern bikes), a metric box wrench set and freewheel removal "socket" (highly dependent on your freewheel).

Other tools get more specialized and you pick those up as you need them. Your LBS (local bike shop) should have these basic tools on hand.
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Old 07-26-14, 07:28 AM
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mid '60s sears bike with campy derailleurs? interested.

my first time ... rebuilding a bike ... i took the bike up to my big lbs (local bike shop) and asked which park (brand) tools i needed for the bb (bottom bracket), headset, and hubs (three $5 cone wrenches). the guy took two tools out of their packaging to ensure the fit. i also bought a park spoke wrench and park cable cutters. i bought non park tools for the chain (a chain breaker) and also to pull the crank off the spindle (a crank 'puller'). i also use quite frequently an adjustable wrench, a flat head screwdriver, an allen wrench multi-tool, and a metric socket set. oh, and park grease!

if you want more specific info, some detailed pics would help.
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Old 07-26-14, 07:35 AM
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Excellent, thanks for the replies already, just what I needed. It's a neat bike, loves to make it a daily rider.

I know for sure I'll have to rebuild the headset, the handlebars feel chunky when they turn.

Still going through and identifying components, I know for sure I have Weinmann 999/650 brakes and found Kool Stop replacements for the pads...
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Old 07-26-14, 02:00 PM
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OK, we need a picture of a Sears with Campy. I know it happens as I once owned a KMart All Pro with a campy rear.
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Old 07-26-14, 02:30 PM
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Could be a Velox.
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Old 07-26-14, 04:48 PM
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If you already have a decent range of tools the only ones I'd add are a pair of cone wrenches that fit your bikes hubs, which are most likely 13 mm or 15 mm (you can get double sided cone wrenchs to have both sizes on the same tool), a crank puller and and bottom bracket tool.

That being said if you're not sure youll work on more than that one bike a couple times, id try and see if theres a bike coop near you. The one near me has every tool imaginable and many people there to explain how to use each one. Its also free to use, which is great as a way to get your feet wet without an investment. If you find youself working on more bikes more often then you'll know exactly what tools you need and youll know that youll actually use them.

Edit: dont be shy about asking questions, especially about all the jargon. That was actually a bit of an obstacle for me when I started reading the forums. (I still cant understand why people insist on using abbreviations like BB to mean bottom bracket. Typing a few more characters is hardly a chore and is very appreciated by newbies like me)

Last edited by Wythnail; 07-26-14 at 04:52 PM.
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Old 07-26-14, 07:20 PM
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Depending on your hubs, you may need two cone wrenches of a certain size -- one goes on the cone, the other on the locknut. I have a 13-14 and a 15-16, as well as duplicates of those sizes.
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Old 07-27-14, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed
OK, we need a picture of a Sears with Campy. I know it happens as I once owned a KMart All Pro with a campy rear.
Pictures will be forthcoming, recovering from the Brady St. Festival today...
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Old 07-27-14, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Wythnail
If you already have a decent range of tools the only ones I'd add are a pair of cone wrenches that fit your bikes hubs, which are most likely 13 mm or 15 mm (you can get double sided cone wrenchs to have both sizes on the same tool), a crank puller and and bottom bracket tool.

That being said if you're not sure youll work on more than that one bike a couple times, id try and see if theres a bike coop near you. The one near me has every tool imaginable and many people there to explain how to use each one. Its also free to use, which is great as a way to get your feet wet without an investment. If you find youself working on more bikes more often then you'll know exactly what tools you need and youll know that youll actually use them.

Edit: dont be shy about asking questions, especially about all the jargon. That was actually a bit of an obstacle for me when I started reading the forums. (I still cant understand why people insist on using abbreviations like BB to mean bottom bracket. Typing a few more characters is hardly a chore and is very appreciated by newbies like me)
We actually have three coops here I could make use of, Vulture Space, Dream Bikes and the Milwaukee Bicycle collective. Nice suggestion, thank you, something I wouldn't mind volunteering at if I ever get my chops up to par.

And thank you about the jargon, I'm sure you're all a familiar with the bicycle culture, sometimes it feels like if you pop into your LBS and you're not riding a belt-driven fixie with a hand-built frame, you're a dork.

As far as other bikes... I actually have a Raleigh 3-speed English Roadster I would love to get back into shape.
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Old 07-27-14, 08:51 PM
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Originally Posted by OrangeBike
Pictures will be forthcoming, recovering from the Brady St. Festival today...
I was there for a few hours on my '68 Raleigh. Place was packed. I'm on the NW side and have some of the tools needed for vintage stuff.
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Old 07-27-14, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by John E
Depending on your hubs, you may need two cone wrenches of a certain size -- one goes on the cone, the other on the locknut. I have a 13-14 and a 15-16, as well as duplicates of those sizes.
What's special about a cone wrench? It looks like a thin box wrench, is it because it's thin?
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Old 07-27-14, 08:56 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed
I was there for a few hours on my '68 Raleigh. Place was packed. I'm on the NW side and have some of the tools needed for vintage stuff.
Yes, good times. The Riverwest 24 had a checkpoint on the Marsupial Bridge, fun to see the people tearing through there. If I get this bike together (and manage to lose a few pounds) I'd like to ride in it next year.
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Old 07-27-14, 09:03 PM
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Get it ready for September and the steel is real ride.
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Steel...32875770091592
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Old 07-27-14, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by dedhed
Get it ready for September and the steel is real ride.
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Steel...32875770091592
Oh, the pressure...
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Old 07-28-14, 05:01 AM
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Hope this article I published on MY "TEN SPEEDS" is a help - Home Made and Store Bought Bicycle Tools.
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Old 07-28-14, 05:12 AM
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Originally Posted by OrangeBike
What's special about a cone wrench? It looks like a thin box wrench, is it because it's thin?
Yes. Regular open end wrench won't fit. On the cone, anyway.
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Old 07-28-14, 07:12 AM
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Maybe I missed it, are the cranks mounted with cotter pins? If not, the proper crank puller is the one tool which I never learned a work around for...
Regards, Eric
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Old 07-28-14, 08:50 AM
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Yes, cottered crank.
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Old 07-28-14, 10:43 AM
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Link to new thread with pics, probably will answer some questions for you guys...
https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...pic-heavy.html
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Old 08-26-14, 09:43 PM
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If anyone is interested in their very own Sears Campy, I happened across the exact same bike as OP's on CL. Small world.


Vintage Ted Williams Sears Sport Racer mens 10 spd
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