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My Mid-60's Sears Road Bike... (pic heavy)

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My Mid-60's Sears Road Bike... (pic heavy)

Old 07-29-14, 12:27 PM
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I've not had problems with scratching chrome using either foil or my preferred steel wool, but I believe it's not the metal that does the scratching but the dirt that may be present (dirt contains silica).

I can use clean steel wool on chrome or even anodized aluminum, seemingly with no scratching occurring.

But of course a rusty surface usually is well-infused with dirt, which can first be washed off in most cases, and using wet steel wool at least allows dirt to drift away from the rubbing surface while you're scrubbing.
And steel wool can also remove chrome that is loose, bubbling or flaking.

Soaking with vinegar/acid is usually the best way to start if this is practical.
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Old 07-29-14, 04:38 PM
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I could get after it with some sort of de-greaser, clean it up... The fork ends are just a chromed portion, not crowns, I believe I'm using that term correctly...

So let me ask some folks with experience on this, how hard is it to rebuild a wheel? The disassembly and re-packing of the hub bearings is no big deal, I've done that before. But what about re-lacing the wheel? I'm a pretty mechanically inclined person (do all my own car repairs, tore apart every bike I've owned) but I've never done the spokes before.

The Sheldon Brown site has a pretty good step-by-step that wasn't daunting and tool-wise I would just need a truing stand, or make one. And I've managed to straighten out my kids wheels before just by leaving the wheels on the forks, but those are Walmart mountain bikes.

So, to me, it looks like a lot of fiddly work that if you have the patience for (key), not too terribly difficult. Am I missing something?

I'm asking for a couple reasons... First off the front spokes are so rusty that to clean them, I would probably spend an equivalent amount of time on fiddly work. Second, I'm having a hard time finding a rear wheel to match the front and get it back to original, I may need to build one.
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Old 07-29-14, 05:38 PM
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Building wheels is easy, but there are many, many things one should know before picking up the wrenches.

Expect a good build to take quite a while the first few times.
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Old 07-29-14, 06:29 PM
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Oh yeah, build your own wheels for sure. You can get your front wheel rounder and straighter with new spokes than with the old ones. It's both easy and fun, though as dddd says it will be slow the first time.

Have you found a replacement hub? Most of the Normandy hubs you find will be the newer style with kidney shaped holes in the flanges, but you want one of the older ones with round holes. I can send you a pair of the former, but I'd suggest you hold out for the latter.
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Old 07-29-14, 06:59 PM
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That's exactly the problem I am having, I have the round cutouts but all I can find are the slotted.

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Old 07-29-14, 07:05 PM
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Here's the next issue LBS sent me home with this, figured I needed to replace them due the tires being so old....
Too wide, won't let the new tires seat.


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Old 07-29-14, 07:07 PM
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Very cool bike- I love the paint
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Old 07-29-14, 07:09 PM
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Old tire left a significant amount of itself on the rim...

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Old 07-29-14, 07:16 PM
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Old tire, new tire. Kenda K35. The tube was still holding air, believe it or not.

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Old 07-29-14, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by coolcamaro12
Very cool bike- I love the paint
Thanks!
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Old 07-29-14, 08:03 PM
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Very cool old bike. We used to see "10 speeds" like this in the Sears catalog and wish we had 'em cutting those vicious Texas Panhandle headwinds into town on our single speeds.
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Old 07-30-14, 01:47 PM
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Well crap... I've having a hard time finding ANY Normandy hub with the round holes versus the slotted. I can find slotted all day long...
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Old 07-30-14, 02:48 PM
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Originally Posted by OrangeBike
Well crap... I've having a hard time finding ANY Normandy hub with the round holes versus the slotted. I can find slotted all day long...
Ah yeah, I was expecting that. Post your want on the ISO thread and keep an eye on eBay. They're out there, but it may take a while to find one. If you get impatient look at Sunshine hubs on eBay. They made s version of that hub in the early 70s and might look right.
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Old 07-30-14, 02:52 PM
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Or Campagnolo Nuovo Tipo. Nice round holes.
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Old 07-30-14, 02:58 PM
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I'm not married to the round hole, but after seeing so many Normandy hubs on sale for a decent price, I thought I could score a rear hub and keep it as close to original as I could. A lot of the Sears Sport Racers I've been able to find have the slotted hubs, so I doubt anybody would notice. But the rounds holes would be unique...

The other issue is the rims. The rear (replacement one) is a Weinmann and has it stamped on the rim. The front (original) has no markings on it whatsoever but is supposed to be a Weinmann.

If I replace the hubs with a matching set, I would replace the rims also for a matching set. What period correct rims would I be looking for?

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Old 07-30-14, 03:03 PM
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Can you post an up close photo of your rear rim? I have a wheel with a Weinmann rim and a Normandy front hub that I can send you if it's a match. I have a rear hub a well. You'd still need to rebuild both wheels.
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Old 07-30-14, 03:19 PM
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I would firstly look for one of the round-hole Sunshine rear hubs that rhm mentioned.

First of all, the look is good, with a correct hole size, and secondly it will be English-threaded, unlike perhaps most of the round-hole Normandies that are likely to turn up.

I would do some sanding to the Sunshine hub before building the wheel, since these don't seem to be machined and so have a more mottled surface finish.
It should make the "Sunshine" stamping less noticeable as well.

My Steyr came with matching hi-flange hubs, but with steel centers. Although same-branded, the rear hub was made in Italy and the front hub made in France!

Here's the rear hub, "Made in Italy". Threading is English:
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Old 07-30-14, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by rhm
Can you post an up close photo of your rear rim? I have a wheel with a Weinmann rim and a Normandy front hub that I can send you if it's a match. I have a rear hub a well. You'd still need to rebuild both wheels.
Cool, thanks.

I have a couple few here, not sure if they will help. I can take more at home later.



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Old 07-30-14, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by dddd
I would firstly look for one of the round-hole Sunshine rear hubs that rhm mentioned.
The Sunshine's are pretty close... how are they for finding parts?

Are quick release skewers interchangeable? Like could I pull a fakey and put Atom skewers on the Sunshine hubs?
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Old 07-30-14, 04:34 PM
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Should work fine.
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Old 07-30-14, 05:02 PM
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My rim would be a passable match to the one in your pic, but let me thank dddd for his support on the Sunshine recommendation. Sunshine hubs are excellent. The QR is the same, and parts will interchange with any Sunshine or Sanshin hub from the 70s or 80s. As for quality, I don't know which is better. I'd bet on Sunshine. The important point, though, is the English threaded freewheel.
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Old 07-30-14, 08:33 PM
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Qr?
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Old 07-30-14, 09:11 PM
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Quick release.... Duh. Sorry.
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Old 07-30-14, 10:22 PM
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What about frame spacing? Ballparky it looks like I have 125mm between the rear dropouts. Can 120mm hubs be fudged into this?
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Old 07-30-14, 10:50 PM
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Originally Posted by OrangeBike
What about frame spacing? Ballparky it looks like I have 125mm between the rear dropouts. Can 120mm hubs be fudged into this?
When you have the new hub in front of you, you'll want to lube the threads and lightly install the freewheel first, so you can then measure the amount of "axle extension" that protrudes past the driveside face of the smallest cog. Modern chains will require a minimum of about 3,5mm in order for the chain to not contact the dropout area of the frame, but...

There is a bolt/nut that secures the rear derailer cog (EDIT, the bolt/nut secures the derailer's mounting claw, not the cog, doh!), and you'll also need some minimum of "axle extension" in order for the smallest cog (and the rotating end of the freewheel body) to clear this bolt/nut. You might want to shorten the bolt and possibly grind the nut thinner in order to allow the freewheel to move as far toward the driveside and thus to require less "axle extension", since axle extension makes the axle weaker because of the added leverage.

After determining the spacer/washer requirements on the driveside axle end for your chosen freewheel, you'll then want to add spacers to the non-driveside end of the axle so as to "fill" the inside width of your frame within the dropouts.
Hopefully then your existing axle can be centered to still provide at least 3mm of protrusion beyond the locknut on each end. If not, a longer axle might be needed.
The axle protrusion can be much longer on the driveside due to the added thickness of the derailer's claw hanger bracket, but at most should be flush with the mounting surfaces so as to allow the quick-release mechanism to compress fully against both sides.

Last edited by dddd; 07-31-14 at 10:38 AM.
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