Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

120mm to 130mm

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

120mm to 130mm

Old 09-09-14, 07:51 PM
  #1  
Frenchosa
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Osaka, Japan
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
120mm to 130mm

I have a 1974 Raleigh International 531 frame that I bought recently. The stays are 120mm spread that I want to coldset to 130mm. I originally thought it was 126mm, and heard that you can mount a 130mm hub with not much of a problem. So, I mounted my 130 mm Shimano Ultegra 600 (model 6402) and it fit and shifted on my stand. However, the quick release can't close tightly. There is two or three mm of axle extending over the drop outs. Could I fit a washer over the axle and ride safely? It has horizontal drop outs.

I am not against cold setting..
Yesterday, I tried cold setting with a threaded rod and did not get much results. I spread the stays to 155mm about six times and then the stays sprung back to about 122mm each time. I then spread it over 160mm one time and measured 122.9 on my digital calipers.

When I spread to 155mm, I didn't feel much resistance... only when I got to 160mm did I feel resistance. Is it safer to go beyond 160mm? I heard that it takes multiple times of spreading to achieve result. I have googled and read a lot about coldsetting, but could find anything about how far to spread to achieve 130mm

I would be willing to get it professionally done, but live in Osaka, Japan and I called two LBS that seem to be vintage friendly, but they are unwilling to coldset. Most other LBS are pro shops that only sell modern bikes and parts and even out source wheel building.

Thanks in advance,

Michael in Osaka
Frenchosa is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 08:05 PM
  #2  
Velocivixen
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,515
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 397 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 18 Posts
I don't know about placing washer over the axle and being safe, however I would try cutting your axle shorter to fit properly in order for he quick releases to function. If your desired parts can fit in here now but the only issue is the axle sticking out, I would cut equal amounts off the ends of both axles. OR get a shorter axle and transfer everything over.
Velocivixen is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 08:33 PM
  #3  
Chombi
Senior Member
 
Chombi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 11,138

Bikes: 1986 Alan Record Carbonio, 1985 Vitus Plus Carbone 7, 1984 Peugeot PSV, 1972 Line Seeker, 1986(est.) Medici Aerodynamic (Project), 1985(est.) Peugeot PY10FC

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 144 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 13 Times in 13 Posts
I suspect that you might be almost too gentle with gradually spreading in very small increments with a threaded rod, nuts and washers. There will always be some spring back from steel, so you have to go past the original spacing width to get it to spring back to 130. Kinda bumping against the yeild point of the steel enough to get to where you want it. I remember cold setting my Peugeot from 120 to 126mm in the 80's myself, and just did it all by feel by lying the frame on it's side, stepping on the dropout that was on the carpet and pulling up on the other dropout. Did it a few times to get my new, wider hub to fit in between the dropouts, and I was surprised how much effort it took to get just an additional 6mm to stay on the frame....... You might be over-thinking/over-complicating this one...... And remember you are going 10mm over original spacing, so it will take more effort than people have to exert just going 6mm over...
Chombi is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 08:52 PM
  #4  
Essthreetee 
Senior Member
 
Essthreetee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Central California
Posts: 1,075

Bikes: 2001 LeMond Nevada City, 92 Merlin Titanium, '84 Torpado Super Strada, 84 Schwinn Tempo, '81 Bianchi Limites, '73 Raleigh Supercourse

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 157 Post(s)
Liked 55 Times in 33 Posts
I did this to my '74 Supercourse. I the scissor jack from my wife's car. Worked great. It seemed to spread both sides at once. (Proceed at your own risk).
__________________
"They ain't following me, I'm just in front." - Rubber Duck

lol <---- does that look like someone drowning to anyone else?
Essthreetee is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 09:09 PM
  #5  
Velocivixen
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,515
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 397 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 18 Posts
I'm fairly confident that 10 mm is too much to cold set a frame. I believe 5 mm max is recommended.
Velocivixen is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 09:13 PM
  #6  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,439

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 274 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20806 Post(s)
Liked 3,789 Times in 2,786 Posts
...the washer thing works, but I'm puzzled as to why you have so much excess axle length with respect to your dropout widths.
If you use washers, try to get some serrated ones, so that you can avoid slippage in the rear on the chainside, which can pull your
rear wheel off center when you stand up and push hard on your pedals.

The problem with just putting a 130mm hub in a 120mm frame is that even though it can be done, it becomes much more of a PIA
to change a flat, and your dropouts are not parallel with the wheel inserted, which puts extra stress on the axle in an unhealthy way
and can result in axle breakage with a stonger rider or heavier loaded bike.

I reset and align frames all the time here, and to do the rear, I pull the crank and BB cups, clamp the frame in a bench vise using
an aluminum soft jaw covering, clamping onto the faces of the BB shell so that the frame is easily measured and the chainstays are
at about waist level.. .....You then tie a string around one dropout, run it up around the head tube, and back to the opposite dropout
(make certain the string comes off both dropouts in the same spot...i.e. symmetrically.

the string gives you a reference for measuring how far each rear dropout reaches outboard from the seat tube, which is where you
measure and try to equalize your distances. Then you just use whatever tool you've chosen as your lever on each side to move each
rear triangle on each side in a series of small increments until they are equally distant from the seat tube (your chosen center line)
and the distance between the inside surfaces is what you want........in this case, 130mm.

Here are some of the essential tools for me. You can probably adapt something to your needs. The vise position gives you a lot
more control than most of the other methods I've seen, but I suppose those work as well.








The final step is to align the dropout faces so they are again parallel. #youcandothis

..
3alarmer is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 09:27 PM
  #7  
Fred Smedley
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,706
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I cold set my 74 International to 130 , it was 126 when I got it, I used the SB method with string, , some tough rear chainstays! Be surre you have the dropouts aligned as well as the hanger, they wont be straight when you are done.
Fred Smedley is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 10:24 PM
  #8  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,439

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 274 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20806 Post(s)
Liked 3,789 Times in 2,786 Posts
Originally Posted by Frenchosa View Post

I called two LBS that seem to be vintage friendly, but they are unwilling to coldset.

Thanks in advance,

Michael in Osaka
Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
I'm fairly confident that 10 mm is too much to cold set a frame. I believe 5 mm max is recommended.
...it is not all that easy to find a professional who both can and will do this here in my town either.

If you think about it, you'll see that the liability issues involved make it unattractive, given what you
can charge someone for the service. There is some possibility of damaging the frame, them most likely
instance being that you can pop loose the seatstay bridge if it is at all insecure in brazing.

I have not experienced personally any limitations with regard to whether 5mm or 10 mm is an outside limit.

I know that people on the forums here (other than me) who are hot to ride these frames with brifters
and 10 speed rear clusters spread them to 130 and 136 on a pretty regular basis without incident.

But there does exist an element of risk in any frame cold bending procedure, so consider yourself warned.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 10:36 PM
  #9  
bikingshearer 
Crawlin' up, flyin' down
 
bikingshearer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Democratic Peoples' Republic of Berkeley
Posts: 4,130

Bikes: 1967 Paramount, 1982-ish Ron Cooper,1978 Eisentraut "A," mid-1960s Cinelli Speciale Corsa, 1961 Bianchi Competizione (an Eroica bike), 1994 Trek 520, 199? Burley Bossa Nova, early-1970s Cinelli Speciale Corsa (also an Eroica bike)

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 318 Post(s)
Liked 295 Times in 159 Posts
Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
I'm fairly confident that 10 mm is too much to cold set a frame. I believe 5 mm max is recommended.
5mm probably is the recommended max, but I have had a couple frames spread from 120mm to 130mm. That much cold setting can crack the paint or dimple the chainstay(s) ever so slightly at the bridge if there is one or next to the BB shell if there isn't - not enough to compromise the strength of the rear triangle, and certainly not enough to crack the frame, but enough to drop the resale value of the frame. Hasn't happened to me, but this is straight from the frame builder who I've had do it. (You guys who do it yourselves are much braver than I am.)


Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
The final step is to align the dropout faces so they are again parallel. #youcandothis

..
Do not omit this step. It is very important. You are more likely to get messed up axles, broken dropouts, and/or crappy shifting performance from misaligned dropouts than you are to get the above-mentioned minor paint or frame damage from spreading the stays 10mm.

There has to be someone in Osaka who is experienced in doing this. I suggest you check with framebuilders in the area if there are no retail shops willing to do the work.
__________________
"I'm in shape -- round is a shape." Andy Rooney
bikingshearer is offline  
Old 09-09-14, 11:58 PM
  #10  
Velocivixen
Senior Member
 
Velocivixen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: The Great Pacific Northwest
Posts: 4,515
Mentioned: 87 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 397 Post(s)
Liked 21 Times in 18 Posts
@3alarmer & @bikingshearer - man I just typed out a nice response and it wouldn't upload. huh

Anyway I asked a mechanic about putting a 9 speed 700c wheel on my 6-speed 27" mixte and it would have required like a 10mm cold set & they said, generally, 5-6mm is all that's typically recommended. Also worried about the thin "top" tubes of the mixte coming away from the seat tube.

Great photos of tools and explanation. Thanks!
Velocivixen is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 03:05 AM
  #11  
Frenchosa
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Osaka, Japan
Posts: 131
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
...the washer thing works, but I'm puzzled as to why you have so much excess axle length with respect to your dropout widths.
I just measured the excess axle length.... the non-drive is 3mm longer than the drive side. There is about 3 or 4 threads popping over the drop out. The drive side axle end seems to end one mm inside the drop outs. All the other Shimano hubs that I have are about equal distance

I bought the hub used on ebay many months ago. Maybe someone replaced the axle at some point?? The hub is now about 20 years old.
Frenchosa is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 04:47 AM
  #12  
Michael Angelo 
Senior Member
 
Michael Angelo's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Hurricane Alley , Florida
Posts: 3,902

Bikes: Treks (USA), Schwinn Paramount, Schwinn letour,Raleigh Team Professional, Gazelle GoldLine Racing, 2 Super Mondias, Carlton Professional.

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Liked 13 Times in 11 Posts
Originally Posted by Frenchosa View Post
I just measured the excess axle length.... the non-drive is 3mm longer than the drive side. There is about 3 or 4 threads popping over the drop out. The drive side axle end seems to end one mm inside the drop outs. All the other Shimano hubs that I have are about equal distance

I bought the hub used on ebay many months ago. Maybe someone replaced the axle at some point?? The hub is now about 20 years old.
You can grind the excess axle length with a grinder, or file. Not to worry about the threads. If the hub ever has to be taken apart, the lock nut will straighten the filed treads on it's way off.
Michael Angelo is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 06:47 AM
  #13  
BradH
Catching Smallmouth
 
BradH's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: In a boat
Posts: 465

Bikes: 1990 Specialized Sirrus Triple, 1985 Trek 460, 2005 Lemond Tourmalet, 1984 Schwinn LeTour 'Luxe, 1988 Trek 400T, 1985 Trek 450, 1997 Lemond Zurich, 1993 Diamond Back Apex, 1988 Schwinn Circuit, 1988 Schwinn Prologue, 1978 Trek TX700, Sannino

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 53 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 27 Times in 19 Posts
Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
@3alarmer & @bikingshearer - man I just typed out a nice response and it wouldn't upload. huh

Anyway I asked a mechanic about putting a 9 speed 700c wheel on my 6-speed 27" mixte and it would have required like a 10mm cold set & they said, generally, 5-6mm is all that's typically recommended. Also worried about the thin "top" tubes of the mixte coming away from the seat tube.
In these situations a person could always use a Shimano (or whatever) 130mm road hub, remove or replace NDS axle spacers to go 126mm and use a rim with offset spokes. You'd have less dish than a 130mm setup with a regular rim lacking spoke offset. Not my idea, I read it here on BF. I just filed it away in my memory for future use. Velocity Synergy, Velocity A23 and Alex Crostini 3.2 come to mind. There are probably more. They all have matching fronts lacking offset.
BradH is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 07:06 AM
  #14  
Pompiere
Senior Member
 
Pompiere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: NW Ohio
Posts: 2,750

Bikes: 1984 Miyata 310, 1986 Schwinn Sierra, 2011 Jamis Quest, 1980 Peugeot TH8 Tandem, 1992 Performance Parabola, 1987 Ross Mt. Hood, 1988 Schwinn LeTour, 1988 Trek 400T, 1981 Fuji S12-S LTD

Mentioned: 17 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 299 Post(s)
Liked 140 Times in 106 Posts
Originally Posted by BradH View Post
In these situations a person could always use a Shimano (or whatever) 130mm road hub, remove or replace NDS axle spacers to go 126mm and use a rim with offset spokes. You'd have less dish than a 130mm setup with a regular rim lacking spoke offset. Not my idea, I read it here on BF. I just filed it away in my memory for future use. Velocity Synergy, Velocity A23 and Alex Crostini 3.2 come to mind. There are probably more. They all have matching fronts lacking offset.
I did a combination of this with my wheel for a 126mm spacing. I cut 4mm off the 130mm axle and reduced the spacer on the NDS to get the hub centered. When I built the wheel I dished it to be centered in the frame.
Pompiere is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 07:14 AM
  #15  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 18,259

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 156 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5017 Post(s)
Liked 1,525 Times in 1,003 Posts
I'd just go with 126 and call it a day. You're already pretty close at 123 mm. 126 mm rear wheels are easy to find and relatively inexpensive. You just end up running a 7 speed and you can go with friction or indexing.
bikemig is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 07:19 AM
  #16  
1987
Senior Member
 
1987's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 856

Bikes: Cinelli SC 1971, Daccordi 1985

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
...

I reset and align frames all the time here, and to do the rear, I pull the crank and BB cups, clamp the frame in a bench vise using
an aluminum soft jaw covering, clamping onto the faces of the BB shell so that the frame is easily measured and the chainstays are
at about waist level.. .....You then tie a string around one dropout, run it up around the head tube, and back to the opposite dropout
(make certain the string comes off both dropouts in the same spot...i.e. symmetrically.

the string gives you a reference for measuring how far each rear dropout reaches outboard from the seat tube, which is where you
measure and try to equalize your distances. Then you just use whatever tool you've chosen as your lever on each side to move each
rear triangle on each side in a series of small increments until they are equally distant from the seat tube (your chosen center line)
and the distance between the inside surfaces is what you want........in this case, 130mm.

Here are some of the essential tools for me. You can probably adapt something to your needs. The vise position gives you a lot
more control than most of the other methods I've seen, but I suppose those work as well.

...
Excellent information and display of tools.
What are the names of those tools?

And a classic link:
Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing
1987 is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 08:40 AM
  #17  
Zaphod Beeblebrox 
PanGalacticGargleBlaster
 
Zaphod Beeblebrox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Smugglers Notch, Vermont
Posts: 7,536

Bikes: Upright and Recumbent....too many to list, mostly Vintage.

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Sheesh, its steel not Al or CF... not a big deal folks and just because one mechanic says something is so, does not make for a blanket recommendation. So trusting we are of people we just assume possess knowledge. Don't believe everything you read on the internet (even Sheldon Brown) and don't trust a LBS mechanic just because he works at a bike shop
__________________
--Don't Panic.
Zaphod Beeblebrox is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 10:24 AM
  #18  
cyclotoine
Senior Member
 
cyclotoine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Yukon, Canada
Posts: 8,772
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Originally Posted by 1987 View Post
Excellent information and display of tools.
What are the names of those tools?

And a classic link:
Bicycle Frame/Hub Spacing
I forget what they are all called but the top is the frame allignment gauge and below that is a big bending tool. I have those. The one below that I am not familiar with but it looks like a more civilized version of the one above. The last one is the fabled headtube straightener. The only one that is still made is probably the top one. Add to this pile the fabled park fork allignment gauge. I have that one, but even with these tools it is still a very tactile feel your way through it sort of operation.
__________________
1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear
cyclotoine is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 11:57 AM
  #19  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,439

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 274 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20806 Post(s)
Liked 3,789 Times in 2,786 Posts
Originally Posted by Zaphod Beeblebrox View Post
Sheesh, its steel not Al or CF... not a big deal folks and just because one mechanic says something is so, does not make for a blanket recommendation. So trusting we are of people we just assume possess knowledge. Don't believe everything you read on the internet (even Sheldon Brown) and don't trust a LBS mechanic just because he works at a bike shop
...to be fair, I work a shift at the bike co-op here, and I am only to be trusted intermittently. More so after coffee, but still....

I honestly do not know the names, and that photo is Randyjawa's, but we have and use the same stuff at our co-op.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 12:15 PM
  #20  
3alarmer
Friendship is Magic
 
3alarmer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: The Big Tomato
Posts: 19,439

Bikes: old ones

Mentioned: 274 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20806 Post(s)
Liked 3,789 Times in 2,786 Posts
Originally Posted by Frenchosa View Post
I just measured the excess axle length.... the non-drive is 3mm longer than the drive side. There is about 3 or 4 threads popping over the drop out. The drive side axle end seems to end one mm inside the drop outs. All the other Shimano hubs that I have are about equal distance

I bought the hub used on ebay many months ago. Maybe someone replaced the axle at some point?? The hub is now about 20 years old.
...somewhere in it's long life, someone has taken it apart for servicing and removed both cones,
rather than leaving one on as a reference point for reassembly.

Either that or it is a replacement axle. You can probably get it to work simply by loosening the cone locknuts on bothsides,
and skooching it over so it's centered.

Count the number of threads exposed past your locknuts on both sides total, divide by two, and that's how many you want on each side.
3alarmer is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 02:20 PM
  #21  
1987
Senior Member
 
1987's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 856

Bikes: Cinelli SC 1971, Daccordi 1985

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 61 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by cyclotoine View Post
I forget what they are all called but the top is the frame allignment gauge and below that is a big bending tool. I have those. The one below that I am not familiar with but it looks like a more civilized version of the one above. The last one is the fabled headtube straightener. The only one that is still made is probably the top one. Add to this pile the fabled park fork allignment gauge. I have that one, but even with these tools it is still a very tactile feel your way through it sort of operation.
Thanks! I really wish I had all those tools. And that I knew how to use them.
I noticed that the image is larger. So here is a clickable version:

And the image is so big that the names are readable on several of them.
And a link to @randyjawa s informative web page where you can find out more about the tools: FRAME/FORK REPAIR TOOLS

Last edited by 1987; 09-11-14 at 05:40 AM.
1987 is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 03:52 PM
  #22  
likebike23
Rides Majestic
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Westfield, MA
Posts: 1,357

Bikes: 1983 Univega Gran Turismo, 1970 Schwinn Super Sport, 2001 Univega Modo Vincere, Self-Built Nashbar Touring, 1974 Peugeot U08, 1974 Atala Grand Prix, 1986 Ross Mt. Hood, 80's Maruishi MT-18

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
If you are at all concerned about damaging the frame, set it to 128mm. You could use a 126 or 130 wheel. Most people recommend the Sheldon Brown method.
likebike23 is offline  
Old 09-10-14, 05:10 PM
  #23  
cyclotoine
Senior Member
 
cyclotoine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Yukon, Canada
Posts: 8,772
Mentioned: 13 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 108 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 8 Posts
I once say an old raleigh or maybe it was a phillips, can't recall that was spread from less than 120mm to 135mm, there was a large and distinct kink in the driveside seatstay, but the bridge was holding. I spread my touring bike from 126 to 135 and it also had the same kink though not as obvious.
__________________
1 Super Record bike, 1 Nuovo Record bike, 1 Pista, 1 Road, 1 Cyclocross/Allrounder, 1 MTB, 1 Touring, 1 Fixed gear
cyclotoine is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 09:02 PM
  #24  
erf
Junior Member
 
erf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I just finished spreading the chain stays successfully. I used the threaded rod method, but it took a few tries. No where did I find how far you needed to spread them for the steel to break its set. The first try I just tried 130mm and it went right back to 120mm. After spreading it out to 140mm and letting it stand over night, it stayed at 122.6mm. At 149mm it held at 125.7mm, so I cranked it up to 157mm and settled to 129.8mm and that is good enough for me.
erf is offline  
Old 04-30-15, 10:41 PM
  #25  
gugie 
Dilberteur at large
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 9,101

Bikes: It's complicated.

Mentioned: 995 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3203 Post(s)
Liked 1,461 Times in 743 Posts
Back in the day we used to cold set frames all the time. Early 80's we had a lot of people wanting to go from 5 speed 120mm to 6 or 7 speed spacing in shops I worked at. As said before, though, you really need the proper tools, even if they're DIY. The unfortunately named Frame Alignment Gauge is a lot better than the string method, and you need the dropouts to be parallel again.

I have both an International and a Competition, both early 70's, both cold set from 120 to 130.

Google "Osaka Japan Framebuilders", surely one of them will either do it for you or tell you who can locally.
gugie is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.