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Which hand do you use to shift or drink?

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Which hand do you use to shift or drink?

Old 09-27-14, 11:09 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by Velocivixen View Post
I stop to drink.
Me too. It gives everyone else a chance to catch up.
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Old 09-27-14, 11:30 AM
  #27  
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Write left handed mostly everything else right handed. In school it was easier for me to use my right hand to write on the black board. So rr dr right hand ft dr left hand. Down tube transmission controls.
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Old 09-27-14, 11:54 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
Me too. It gives everyone else a chance to catch up.
That's funny! You sound like a flippin' rock star in your crowd. Strong work!
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Old 09-27-14, 11:55 AM
  #29  
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Usually shift right (both levers - downtube) and drink left. USUALLY.
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Old 09-27-14, 11:57 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
I would disagree there, at least on dry pavement. On wet pavement or gravel I need both brakes together, but otherwise I use the front primarily, because it is so much more effective than the rear. See Sheldon Brown's excellent articles on braking.

American fear of the front brake led us to the current default configuration of left front / right rear, which is arguably not the best way to have done things for the right-handed majority.
Not the 'Dual Control' as in the modern world of cycling.....


It's good to know I can now text while using both brakes
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Old 09-27-14, 12:12 PM
  #31  
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Left hand for FD, right hand for RD, and I'm in the "I'll hydrate when I stop" club 90% of the time. On the rare occasions that I drink while in motion, I think I use my right.
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Old 09-27-14, 04:40 PM
  #32  
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When I'm drinking water from the on-bike bottles, right hand. When I stop for my on-the-road Starbucks, I'll carry it in my left hand and sip until I'm finished. There are advantages to sitting in a recumbent seat and steering/shifting/braking with just the right hand.
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Old 09-27-14, 07:07 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by crank_addict View Post
Not the 'Dual Control' as in the modern world of cycling.....


It's good to know I can now text while using both brakes
Nothing new about dual-pull handles, which were popular on tandems in the 1970s -- dual pull on one side for both rim brakes, single pull on the other for a rear drum brake to avoid overheating the rims on long descents. The bike polo crowd typically uses a y-connector to control both brakes from the left, as well as a left-mounted grip shift for the rear derailleur.

When I worked at a bike shop in the early 1970s I set up a couple of bikes for folks with missing or compromised hands/arms, using either dual-pull handles or the yoke/y-connector. We have a one-armed chap over in the 50+ forum -- Trek engineers worked with him to devise a really slick right side control system for both brakes and both derailleurs, taking advantage of modern electronic shift.
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Old 09-27-14, 07:42 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by John E View Post
Nothing new about dual-pull handles, which were popular on tandems in the 1970s -- dual pull on one side for both rim brakes, single pull on the other for a rear drum brake to avoid overheating the rims on long descents.
Like this:

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Old 09-27-14, 07:48 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by LesterOfPuppets View Post
Anyone ever successfully shift a brifter or gripshift with the wrong hand without crashing?
I did once, when the bike was on the stand in the shop. Otherwise, I was never too coordinated at that sort of thing.

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Old 09-28-14, 04:15 AM
  #36  
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Right hand shifts both down tube shifters sometimes and sometimes left hand shifts the front. Water bottle with right mostly. Front brake on the left. I also come from an m/c background/present and never had a problem confusing the two different vehicle set ups. Also mouse with the left hand so I can write with the right hand without having to continually swap 'instruments' back and forth.
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Old 09-28-14, 04:47 AM
  #37  
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I've been a bit surprised at how easily I have retrained this 'handed stuff' lately, especially for someone "at my advanced state of decay". A couple of years ago I became intrigued with track stands and decided there was no reason why a 60 year old man could not learn to track stand a freewheel/freehub bicycle. My right leg was dominate but that did not suit the road chamfer so I retrained to slow and stop with my left leg forward and spent the winter 'indoor cycling' and learning to track stand. Not hard to switch legs.

This spring I started riding the DT shifters in earnest (stem shifters before that - left did left, r did r) and decided to retrain my right hand to do both. No worries and I like it better. I yank the bottle with my right hand and keep my left eye on the road when drinking. I only drink in the wide open - little chance of needing to brake. I too own motorcycles but just trained my cycling hands to use the right for rear and left for front. No worries. What took some time was training my right hand to drag the brake thru tight turns but that's just like using my right foot on the beemer. Finally due to track standing with the left foot forward I now drop that foot off the pedal first when stopping. That also comes from motorcycles and the road chamfer.

What I still have trouble with is replacing the bottle in the cage without looking. I have the ergonomics set up the same on my 4 primary riders but all the cages are in slightly different spots on the DT and relative to my bars so, as I switch between my 4 primary riders, I most often need to look down to see the cage each time. On the Raleigh Pro I keep missing the cage when I don't look and I hear the bottle skidding n tumbling back across the pavement. Oops
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Old 09-28-14, 01:21 PM
  #38  
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Shift Right. Drink Left.
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