Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

UO8 in WA State - What years had stem shifters?

Notices
Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

UO8 in WA State - What years had stem shifters?

Old 09-30-14, 04:04 PM
  #1  
Aurorabucky
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South Whidbey Island, WA
Posts: 112

Bikes: 2000 Raleigh M50, 2010 Specialized Roubaix Elite, 1973 Peugeot UO8, 197X Mercier 300, 196X Bottecchia Giro D'Italia

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
UO8 in WA State - What years had stem shifters?

Hey all,

I have a nice green Peugeot UO8 that in classic fashion, I rescued from the local dump. To make a long story short, an alloy wheelset, a rear derailleur that isn't plastic, cleanup, bar tape, inspection of the deathstem, etc, etc, later I've got a very nice machine that'll soon get nicer with the addition of some Sykes cherrywood fenders.

The odd thing about this one is that I've got stem shifters, and no downtube shifter brazeons - just cable guides. Most of the UO-8s I've seen online have downtube shifters. Scouring the web, I've seen a few with the stem shifters, and usually green (like mine) and they're around the 73' or 74' model years (pretty sure, like mine).

For me, they're fine. I have another bike for days where I have to burn rubber, and the stem shifters sorta remind me to relax. But believe it or not, I've gotten questions on the shifters from people......

So does anyone know the story behind the change? Did they produce a mishmash in 1973 with the boom in full swing or was there an option that year for shifters in the place of your choice?

Once the fenders arrive and I do some of my final cosmetic touch-ups, pics to come.

Thanks all!
Aurorabucky is offline  
Old 09-30-14, 04:44 PM
  #2  
uncle uncle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: south kansas america
Posts: 1,738

Bikes: too many

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 344 Post(s)
Liked 93 Times in 72 Posts
It's hard for the C&V crowd to come to grips with them (pun intended), but stem shifters were a heralded improvement when they first appeared on the bike scene. Like turkey levers, stem shifters were a design compromise with the novice rider in mind. They provided a safer bicycling experience, since shifting them didn't require reaching down for a lever, and the off balance shift to the center-of-gravity that reaching for normal shifter levers demands. But, just like turkey levers, anyone using them had their cycling bravado immediately brought into question. By the way, I have a 74ish U0-8 with Simplex stem shifters, which are the shifting equivalent, as far as I can describe with words, of crayola-ing with squishy bananas. But it's not because they are stem shifters, it's because the plastic levers are so flexy, imo (your mileage may very). I am either going to switch to down-tube shifters, if I can find something that will work around the braze on cable stops, or I'm going to find some KA stem shifters, which can be had for a pittance, even the grooviest ones. And yes, I am comfortable with my bicycling bravado.
uncle uncle is offline  
Old 09-30-14, 05:12 PM
  #3  
The Golden Boy 
Extraordinary Magnitude
 
The Golden Boy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Waukesha WI
Posts: 12,685

Bikes: 1978 Trek TX700; 1978/79 Trek 736; 1984 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport; 1984 Schwinn Voyageur SP; 1985 Trek 620; 1985 Trek 720; 1986 Trek 400 Elance; 1987 Schwinn High Sierra; 1990 Miyata 1000LT

Mentioned: 76 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2208 Post(s)
Liked 709 Times in 431 Posts
If you want downtube shifters, many bikes from that era had clamp on shifters mounted to the downtube. That braze on that keeps the cable stop from slipping also held a shifter band clamp.

It's possible your bike had downtubes and the owner wanted stem shifters... so it was swapped TO stem shifters.

I've got a decent set of stem shifters- I might be mounting them to my High Sierra- right now it's got Barcons on it- Heck, I might take the nice ratcheting Power Shifters out of the Barcon pods and mount them in the stem shifter housing...
__________________
*Recipient of the 2006 Time Magazine "Person Of The Year" Award*

Commence to jigglin’ huh?!?!

"But hey, always love to hear from opinionated amateurs." -says some guy to Mr. Marshall.
The Golden Boy is offline  
Old 09-30-14, 05:31 PM
  #4  
Aurorabucky
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South Whidbey Island, WA
Posts: 112

Bikes: 2000 Raleigh M50, 2010 Specialized Roubaix Elite, 1973 Peugeot UO8, 197X Mercier 300, 196X Bottecchia Giro D'Italia

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Thanks for the reply. Nice to hear from someone else with that setup.

Ahhh, you speak of the flexy shifters with the thin-as-foil chrome bent around them? I didn't understand what folks meant about the "skills" needed to shift a 10-speed until I put some gas on the pedals while shifting those Simplex shifters with the French 5-speed freewheel. Ugly sound.... Seems like you had to get that derailleur right on the cog, and those shifters didn't make it any easier.

I buddy of mine was overjoyed enough to see me join the world of vintage rides that he gave me a nice set of Suntour stem shifters and a 6-speed Suntour freewheel to boot. I've got them on there now, the rear now being 126mm. Shifting is a no-brainer now. He's a good friend.

As far as being converted from downtube shifters, that could well be the case. I thought that most of the UO8s I saw in pictures had dedicated brazeons welded to the downtube, but when I look closer, I see it IS a clamp. So yeah, maybe that model year had one frame that was meant to be used multiple ways?

Anyhow, given that I like'em where they are, I'll do my best to steel my bravado when someone says "Hey, a UO-8! I had one of those, but it was higher end...you know...with downtube shifters?" Sigh.....
Aurorabucky is offline  
Old 09-30-14, 10:37 PM
  #5  
SkyDog75
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 3,794

Bikes: Bianchi San Mateo and a few others

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 633 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 10 Times in 6 Posts
I'm glad my 1972-73 UO-8 came with stem shifters because I wanted to run barcons. The cable stops on the downtube work great for bar end shifters and there's no funky one-sided shifter boss on the frame left unused.
SkyDog75 is offline  
Old 10-01-14, 05:07 AM
  #6  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,336

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1190 Post(s)
Liked 285 Times in 144 Posts
My '72 UO-8, also upgraded, came with stem shifters. The DT had brazed-on cable stops. After a year or so I switched it over to Simplex DT shifters. Back then many (most?) DT shifters were attached with a band, and the DT may or may not have a brazed-on knob to anchor it. I mounted mine above the upper pump peg, and flipped the band and levers over so that the screw flanges would straddle the peg for stability. That was probably not necessary. They are still in place and I still ride it regularly.

Yes, those derailleurs could be a bit messy to shift. Of course you should unload the pedals when shifting the front since unlike the RD it operates on a tensioned part of the chain. The main reason I switched to DT levers was to eliminate one section of cable housing and two cable ends, all of which added friction to the cable and made shifting worse. The switch did improve the shifting, but not as much as the eventual switch to a VGT-Luxe or Vx RD.

As for whether stem shifters were an improvement, I'm not so sure. Like the turkey lever, it was an attempt by manufacturers to improve the bike's appeal to the mass market by seeming to solve one of the things that scared people. In my experience it was not an improvement, and shifting those stem levers was always problematic. ("Improvements" like that which didn't really help may have been one reason the mass market lost interest in the bicycle so quickly - they turned out not all that easy to shift after all.) But they can be made to work well enough and many people here like them. Bar-end shifters have nominally the same issues, another housing section and two more cable stops, and people love them.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 11-02-14, 02:47 AM
  #7  
Aurorabucky
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South Whidbey Island, WA
Posts: 112

Bikes: 2000 Raleigh M50, 2010 Specialized Roubaix Elite, 1973 Peugeot UO8, 197X Mercier 300, 196X Bottecchia Giro D'Italia

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Hey everyone! We hit Halloween and like a zombie, this post rises from the dead.
I come bearing photos (finally) and a question. First, the fun stuff:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/773256...7649078607201/

My question: I'm switching to downtube shifters in the end. I had a few too many times where my knees tried to bump the stemshifters on steep climbs, and I found a set of shifters I really liked on ebay.
Seems like I'm in a similar situation to some of the other posters, in that I only have cable guides on that downtube. I take it the best I can do is clamp the new Huret shifters above those guides? @jimmuller mounted his on the frame pump mount. I feel like that'd be awful far up on that downtube.
Aurorabucky is offline  
Old 11-02-14, 06:07 AM
  #8  
jimmuller 
What??? Only 2 wheels?
 
jimmuller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Boston-ish, MA
Posts: 13,336

Bikes: 73 Raleigh Carlton Gran Sport, 72 Peugeot UO-8, 82 Peugeot TH8, 87 Bianchi Brava, 76? Masi Grand Criterium, 87 Centurion Ironman Expert, 74 Motobecane Champion Team, 86 & 77 Gazelle champion mondial, 81? Grandis, 82? Tommasini, 83 Peugeot PF10

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1190 Post(s)
Liked 285 Times in 144 Posts
Originally Posted by Aurorabucky View Post
@jimmuller mounted his on the frame pump mount. I feel like that'd be awful far up on that downtube.
Or down the uptube perhaps? Actually that position isn't a problem at all. It doesn't interfere with anything and easy to reach. All my bikes have the levers in slightly different positions, and it isn't a problem. The bike I have the most problem with is the Raleigh. It's brazed-on stop for the clamp is so far down the DT the levers require a bit of a reach.
__________________
Real cyclists use toe clips.
With great bikes comes great responsibility.
jimmuller
jimmuller is offline  
Old 11-02-14, 06:10 AM
  #9  
wrk101
Thrifty Bill
 
wrk101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Mountains of Western NC
Posts: 22,599

Bikes: 86 Katakura Silk, 87 Prologue X2, 88 Cimarron LE, 1975 Sekai 4000 Professional, 73 Paramount, plus more

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 906 Post(s)
Liked 322 Times in 242 Posts
Yep, clamp them above the stem shifter stops, or use thumb shifters on the handlebars, or bar end shifters.

Very nice job on that UO8, one of the nicest, if not the nicest, I have seen!

+1 Using the pump peg as a cable stop instead is a nice idea, and further up should not be a problem.
wrk101 is offline  
Old 11-02-14, 08:10 PM
  #10  
Aurorabucky
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South Whidbey Island, WA
Posts: 112

Bikes: 2000 Raleigh M50, 2010 Specialized Roubaix Elite, 1973 Peugeot UO8, 197X Mercier 300, 196X Bottecchia Giro D'Italia

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Glad you approve.

The biggest challenge of the bike when I rescued it was cleaning off a TON of tan latex overspray that someone put on it. It covered the bottom half of the bike so thick that I didn't know what decals it had on it at the dump. It was on there in many layers too. Had to use goop-off and orange degreaser, but it eventually came off. EVERYTHING had to be removed, taken completely apart, scrubbed, and reassembled.

The parts changes I made to fix it up:
-I found a replacement for the "deathstem", a forged ATAX, and then went so far as to find the right "Made in France" decal for it.
-I replaced the stock wheelset with alloy CR18s and Origin8 sealed hubs. 27x1.25 Specialized Roadsport tires that the LBS had in stock (go them!)
-Simplex Prestige shifters replaced with Suntour, and soon to be Huret Challenger
-The Simplex rear derailleur with a yr 2000 Acera I had waiting for a use.
-And I replaced odds and ends like brake pads, ball bearings, some cable work, handlebar tape, etc.
-Found a NOS Silca Impero. Still learning how to use it right. Added tricolor tape to mimic the original scheme.
-The seat is NOT stock but came with it. It's a Kashima Hi-soft. Was going to replace it, but it's proven to be darn comfortable and cleaned up well.

Other than that, I'm leaving it about as it was. The steel bars and seatpost work just fine and look good.

The Simplex front der will probably die in the future, but for now it works astonishingly well for a part that's drawn a lot of online hatred, and hasn't developed cracks..... I'll be inspecting that every week. The cranks probably add a full pound, but once again look alright, and work well.

The chain from the dump was ancient....but in good health. It's a little short with the long cage Acera, so I'll replace it or at least add some links.

The "nice" fittings I think are the cherry fenders by Paul Sykes out of Portland, and the cotton/shellac handlebar tape. The latter was a royal pain but rewarding. I did the harlequin pattern in orange and yellow for the tops down to the hood, then went with a simple wrap of yellow to the bar ends. Then I put four coats of amber shellac on it. I see why people do this setup - other than looking classy, it functions very well. Grippy on the gloves.

Also dug up some VO vintage bottle cages and handlebar mounts. I thought it looked 50's racer style, and I'll need them for summer rides.

All in all, it's not super light - 30 lbs counting frame pump and light tools. On the road the weight doesn't seem to matter since I don't race it. What I like so much about this bike is the ride and handling. It feels lively enough that it stays fun, yet it's so stable. We have a lot of chipseal around here, and the ride makes it not so annoying. Comparing it to my dedicated roadie, a Specialized Roubaix 7r, I'm surprised how "not slow" it feels. I go out to ride it with the intention of taking it nice and slow, and within ten minutes, I'm putting it through its paces.
Aurorabucky is offline  
Old 11-02-14, 08:35 PM
  #11  
John E
feros ferio
 
John E's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
Posts: 20,406

Bikes: 1959 Capo Modell Campagnolo; 1960 Capo Sieger (2); 1962 Carlton Franco Suisse; 1970 Peugeot UO-8; 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia; 1988 Schwinn Project KOM-10;

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 973 Post(s)
Liked 378 Times in 278 Posts
The factory stem shifters were a blessedly short-lived experiment, introduced late in 1972 and terminated by 1974. I worked at a Peugeot dealership during that period, and those things were indeed dreadful.

If your UO-8 came from the factory with downtube shifters, it will have a single drive side shifter boss -- that way, the French could make 5- and 10-speed frames using the same setup. For a 10-speed, Simplex made a clamp-on left side shift lever boss. My current UO-8 fits this category -- I chiseled off the right side Simplex-specific boss and covered the area with a SunTour double cable stop to accommodate SunTour stem shifters for my wife, later SunTour barcons for me.

If your UO-8 came with stem shifters, it will have -- as others have noted -- dual cable stops, which are ideal for barcons and various brake lever mounted shifting systems.

I have always viewed stem shifters the way I view a column-mounted automotive shifter. They seem convenient for the casual user, but the enthusiast always wanted the shorter, more positive linkage provided by downtube shifters or a floor-mounted gearshift.
__________________
"Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing." --Theodore Roosevelt
Capo: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger (2), S/N 42624, 42597
Carlton: 1962 Franco Suisse, S/N K7911
Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
Bianchi: 1982 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069
John E is offline  
Old 11-02-14, 08:40 PM
  #12  
gioscinelli 
Senior Member
 
gioscinelli's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,245

Bikes: 2012 Moots VaMoots-74 Peugeot Mixtie U018-73 Peugeot U018

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Gorgeous Peugeot U08 and super job on recovering a nice classic bike. You're now a full fledged member of C&V!
__________________
Moots VaMoots 2012-Peugeot Mixte 1974-Peugeot Mixte 1973
gioscinelli is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 11:33 AM
  #13  
Aurorabucky
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South Whidbey Island, WA
Posts: 112

Bikes: 2000 Raleigh M50, 2010 Specialized Roubaix Elite, 1973 Peugeot UO8, 197X Mercier 300, 196X Bottecchia Giro D'Italia

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Alright. I now have downtube shifters. There were points installing them where I was sweating bullets, but I made it work, and it looks proper.

The traumatic part of the installation was realizing that the shifter fit over the cable guide was going to be awkward. Maybe it was the shifter assembly I chose or what, but the guides only had a tiny lip of metal from the circles on the braze-on that made contact with the clamp. That little circle is so bendy that I saw it deforming over time, and the setup looked messy. On top of that, in test-fitting the clamp on I kept putting lots of tiny scratches in the paint.

The point of no return came when I thought "Hey, maybe I can gently bend the circle of the cable guide a bit and let the clamp put a bit more material on that brazeon. After doing that and realizing the error of my ways, I bent it back, and surveyed the carnage. It was then that I realized that an amputation might be in order. (this gets worse and worse)

So 15 minutes later after some deep soul searching, I took pliers and fatigued the two circles off either side (leaving the cups in for now) and carefully filed the remnant down to the brazeon surface. I gotta say, after babying the frame for so long, and considering it sacred, going at it with a file and pliars.....I don't know what to put here..... I put nail polish over the metal to keep it protected until I eventually get some paint matched to perfection.

Things really took an upturn when I put the shifters on. That brazeon turned into a perfect stop for the clamp, where most of the brazeon is UNDER the cable-stop part of the shifter and hidden. Other than the cups (frame cable stops) being right next to the camp on ones, the setup looks neat and tidy and secure and like it might have been designed that way. A bit of cable work installing some new white housings and stainless cables and I had bright shiny downtube shifters.

Commuted in on it this morning. All works great. Pics to come.

The C & V community has been very supportive and I'd like to say thanks to everyone.

Last edited by Aurorabucky; 11-06-14 at 05:33 PM.
Aurorabucky is offline  
Old 11-06-14, 01:00 AM
  #14  
dddd
Ride, Wrench, Swap, Race
 
dddd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Northern California
Posts: 7,984

Bikes: Cheltenham-Pederson racer, Boulder F/S Paris-Roubaix, Varsity racer, '52 Christophe, '62 Continental, '92 Merckx, '75 Limongi, '76 Presto, '72 Gitane SC, '71 Schwinn SS, etc.

Mentioned: 112 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1066 Post(s)
Liked 496 Times in 353 Posts
Good looking GREEN Peugeot, and I hope that the fender installation is safely anchored, especially in front.

Stem shifters re-appeared on the UO8 model, at least by 1978, and remained for the heavily re-designed 1979 and subsequent models. My 1979 UO9 model still wears the original Simplex stem shifters, and they allow spirited riding, but with some extra care while riding hard to prevent knee contact.

Plastic shift levers don't flex noticeably with fresh cabling operating smoothly, but I always hear that they flex like crazy. Perhaps some of the flex is coming from lengths of old-style cable housing?

Old bikes with old chain can't be shifted like an old bike with modern chain, at least if the freewheel is compatible with modern chain, and the shifting should be effortless if the cabling also moves freely without friction.

The cable stops on many of the old, modest-priced Peugeots and Schwinns make fitting modern shift cable housing difficult. They don't easily accept common ferrules, but modern shift housing needs ferrules to keep the housing wires from protruding into the cable's path (into the hole in the cable stop). I've often had to use brake housing with a bit of the vinyl covering stripped off in order to get new, lined housings fitted.

Pre-1979 Peugeot UO8's and UO9's have an odd combination of frame angles, with a steeper head tube angle than seat tube angle, but from 1979 on, this was reversed, with a triathlon-esque 2-degree-steeper seat tube angle and 1-degree-shallower head tube angle. The bike's personality was radically changed (for the better if one likes to do shorter, faster rides over steep, rolling terrain). The newer frames also have shorter chainstays, and with all cable stops brazed on rather than spot-welded onto the tubing. The 1979 and newer frames also lost the "Aztec"-design lugs and got a 103 tubing label.
dddd is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
cnnrmccloskey
General Cycling Discussion
53
01-19-17 08:55 AM
fettsvenska
Classic & Vintage
67
04-05-13 11:06 AM
xenologer
Road Cycling
4
01-11-12 02:29 PM
Motoyuki
Classic & Vintage
6
12-19-10 06:35 AM
Omiak
Classic & Vintage
16
02-28-10 04:11 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.