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Want to fix up my Raleigh to ride again

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Want to fix up my Raleigh to ride again

Old 10-05-14, 11:19 AM
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RunForTheHills 
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Want to fix up my Raleigh to ride again

I have had this bike since I went away to college more than 30 years ago. My Dad built it for me from a used frame he bought. The frame is a '74 Raleigh International, but none of the components are original. The hubs, headset, and bottom bracket are campy. I had a bike shop repack the bearings and change the pedals, saddle, and brake levers about 15 or 16 years ago when I decided to do some weekend riding with it (I was more into running than riding at the time). It has been sitting in my garage for the last 15 years after we moved to the mountains. The gearing on it is not compatible with the roads in this area and the roads are narrow with a lot of traffic. I am working on a contract in the Bay Area this year and commuting up there, so I have taken the bike up there with me to ride.

I think I would like to put a Brooks saddle on it again. I am also considering putting a Shimano freewheel on it with a 34t cog. The Sun tour V GT derailleur on it can handle up to that size. It probably needs new tires and tubes. Would it look better to change the brake levers back to levers with the cable coming out the top? I am also thinking about getting rid of the clipless pedals and getting platforms.

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Old 10-05-14, 11:43 AM
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Thanks for you message JBHoren. I don't quite have enough posts to reply through PMs yet. I need 50 posts. I am not planning to do a full restore at this time. I just want to ride it again. I may keep an eye out for the parts to do that in the future though.
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Old 10-05-14, 12:53 PM
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I'd say ride it, and make modifications with the goal of enhancing your enjoyment of riding.

Old style brake levers are probably a step backwards.

In the end It's your call, obey the voices in your head, not strangers on the interweb.
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Old 10-05-14, 01:32 PM
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Nice looking Raleigh. I agree with wide45 if there is nothing wrong with it just change things as they break or wear or for comfort.
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Old 10-05-14, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by RunForTheHills View Post
I have had this bike since I went away to college more than 30 years ago.
I've been riding a '74 International for 40 years and have modified it to suit my requirements many times.
It's been road raced, used as a FG training bike, in cyclo cross, loaded touring and now as a town bike.
The Period Correct Police haven't issued any fines yet.

Service the bearings, install fresh rubber, re-gear as necessary and proceed.

The classic British clubrider's bikes were designed to be versatile, unlike so many one trick ponies today.



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Old 10-05-14, 01:41 PM
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Since you asked, I think the 34T freewheel is a good idea, if you've got hills to climb, and your derailleur can candle it fine, as you said. Fifteen years is getting up on old age for tires, but I've got some 25+ that are OK, but I'm careful on them (no fast descending). Also fifteen years is a good long time between lube jobs, even if it was done correctly and stored carefully, so it would be a good idea to repack the hubs and bottom bracket. The brake levers you have now are better than original, so keep them unless you decide to actually restore the bike, rather than just make it into a nice daily rider.

That's a nice bike; I hope you put a lot of miles on it.
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Old 10-05-14, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
I've been riding a '74 International for 40 years and have modified it to suit my requirements many times.
It's been road raced, used as a FG training bike, in cyclo cross, loaded touring and now as a town bike.
The Period Correct Police haven't issued any fines yet.

Service the bearings, install fresh rubber, re-gear as necessary and proceed.

The classic British clubrider's bikes were designed to be versatile, unlike so many one trick ponies today.



-Bandera
I like the handlebar setup you have and the yellow tape looks good with the copper paint. What kind are they?
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Old 10-05-14, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Lascauxcaveman View Post
Since you asked, I think the 34T freewheel is a good idea, if you've got hills to climb, and your derailleur can candle it fine, as you said. Fifteen years is getting up on old age for tires, but I've got some 25+ that are OK, but I'm careful on them (no fast descending). Also fifteen years is a good long time between lube jobs, even if it was done correctly and stored carefully, so it would be a good idea to repack the hubs and bottom bracket. The brake levers you have now are better than original, so keep them unless you decide to actually restore the bike, rather than just make it into a nice daily rider.

That's a nice bike; I hope you put a lot of miles on it.
Even in the East Bay there are hills I can't get up without stopping a couple of times. It is probably my weak legs and I need to get in better shape, but I think I would enjoy the rides more in the mean time with a lower gear. I can always change it back later.

Do you really think repacking the bearings is necessary? I doubt I rode it more than a hundred miles before I put it away. I should have the tools for it already though, so I guess I should repack them for the learning experience if nothing else.
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Old 10-05-14, 03:23 PM
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Originally Posted by RunForTheHills View Post
Do you really think repacking the bearings is necessary? I doubt I rode it more than a hundred miles before I put it away. I should have the tools for it already though, so I guess I should repack them for the learning experience if nothing else.
Yes you should re-pack the bearings. Even without riding it the grease has degraded over the years. Since you have the tools it will be pretty easy work and is good, cheap insurance for expensive parts.
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Old 10-05-14, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Kactus View Post
Yes you should re-pack the bearings. Even without riding it the grease has degraded over the years. Since you have the tools it will be pretty easy work and is good, cheap insurance for expensive parts.
+ 1. Not only repack the bearings but also swap out the old tires. A larger freewheel makes sense. After that, as others have said, just change out parts as needed.
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Old 10-05-14, 03:45 PM
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since you need to service all bearings, you might as well perform a full overhaul. it will ride like a brand new bicycle. when doing so, spray a light oil on each spoke nipple and give each a half turn (loose then tight again). hopefully all will turn smoothly allowing the wheels to be true another ten years.

along with the freewheel, i'd also replace the seatpost with a one-bolt model like the sr laprade that you can find in a co-op for a fiver. the uglier, the better, 'cause they're easy to polish with sandpaper.

i also always put kool-stop salmon pads on my bikes. they last almost forever, and nothing provides better braking.
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Old 10-05-14, 05:41 PM
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With the advice you have received here, I think this will work out well. The frame is one of the nicest and most versatile vintage frames out there. Also one of the most coveted.
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Old 10-05-14, 06:06 PM
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Some of the hills in the East Bay are very steep indeed. 10% is common and 15% is not uncommon. Worthy of a triple crank. You might drop by a local coop and see if they have a triple road crank and suitable bottom bracket, that would look and work right with the bike. Save the current pieces, of course.

I would replace the tubes and tires (something like a Panaracer Pasela only costs $30/ea and comes in tanwall which would look great). Coming down those hills is no time for a failure. I once bought an old bike and was descending a hill at >25 mph when the old tube split, blowing the old tire's bead off the rim. This was the front tire. A crash was barely avoided.
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Old 10-05-14, 09:55 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl View Post
Some of the hills in the East Bay are very steep indeed. 10% is common and 15% is not uncommon. Worthy of a triple crank. You might drop by a local coop and see if they have a triple road crank and suitable bottom bracket, that would look and work right with the bike. Save the current pieces, of course.

I would replace the tubes and tires (something like a Panaracer Pasela only costs $30/ea and comes in tanwall which would look great). Coming down those hills is no time for a failure. I once bought an old bike and was descending a hill at >25 mph when the old tube split, blowing the old tire's bead off the rim. This was the front tire. A crash was barely avoided.
I will definitely replace the tires. I hadn't thought about a triple on the front. The bottom bracket is Campy, would a triple crank require something different? I will switch out the current 5 gear freewheel for a 6 gear Shimano with a 34t gear first and see if that is enough.

I appreciate everyone's advise.
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Old 10-05-14, 10:23 PM
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Another option would be something like a TA double crankset, which would allow smaller chainrings than your Campy.

If you can borrow a bike with low gearing (maybe an old mtb or touring bike), you could ride it up the steepest, nastiest hills you can find, take note of the gears that work for you, and then replicate that on your bike.

A gear calculator like this one is invaluable for working this stuff out.

Very nice bike you have there - enjoy.
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Old 10-05-14, 10:34 PM
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It could get complicated if you try to put a triple on. Try the 34t rear first and see how that goes. It was all I ever needed on my epic European trip, and my bike was heavily loaded. My inner chainring was 42t.
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Old 10-06-14, 10:09 AM
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A triple crank will probably require a different bottom bracket with a longer spindle. A modern sealed bearing square taper bottom bracket is not expensive. The crank itself can be bought used. Either a road triple or a mountain triple can be used, with the road more likely to look "right" on your classic Raleigh. Most likely your front derailleur will reach far enough, and that can be checked before making the swap. You will not need a longer chain. Your existing rear derailleur can certainly accommodate a 26 or 28 low cog.

The main advantage of the triple is that you can use a smaller "low" cog on the freewheel for smaller steps between the gears, and avoid the look of a pie plate cog if that matters to you. 30 x 26 is lower than 42 x 34. 30 x 28 is lower yet, and a 14-26 and 14-28 six speed freewheels are both pretty common. Or, if you use a mountain triple, you can get an even lower gear, 22 x 28 for example. The main disadvantage is that the conversion is a little more involved.
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Old 10-06-14, 04:50 PM
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The Shimano 6 speed 14-34T freewheel is about $10 and it is another $20 for an SRAM PC 870 chain, so for $30 I can get a gear that I think will work for me. I will try the triple if it doesn't work out, or maybe a compact double. I don't think I would have any trouble with a 50/34 on the front and a 14-34 on the back.
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Old 10-06-14, 05:19 PM
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I'd use a KMC chain, like an x8.93 instead. I have a SRAM PC68 (predecessor to the 890) and a PC850 IIRC. I think the KMCs are better, and cheaper. my $0.02
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Old 10-06-14, 06:23 PM
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I recommend KMC chains, too. SRAM chains seem to have a high failure rate.

I agree that 34/34 will most likely suffice for any hill. And there's always walking.

You're going to show us pictures, right?!
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Old 10-06-14, 07:49 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I recommend KMC chains, too. SRAM chains seem to have a high failure rate.

I agree that 34/34 will most likely suffice for any hill. And there's always walking.

You're going to show us pictures, right?!
That's a bummer. I just put an SRAM chain on my Jamis. If it fails, I will replace it with a KMC chain. I will post pictures, but it will likely be a few weeks before I do. I have to finish the Jamis this weekend and I won't be up north the following weekend.
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Old 10-06-14, 07:54 PM
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Where will you be in the Bay Area? Have any rides picked out?
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Old 10-06-14, 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl View Post
Where will you be in the Bay Area? Have any rides picked out?
I work up here during the week and rent a room in Concord. I have been riding to the office when I can. I have to drive to other locations for the customer a few times a week. I stay over the weekend every other week or so and that is when I can work on the bikes. There is the Iron Horse trail nearby and the Contra Costa Canal Trail that I have been riding on. I rode up to and around the town of Clayton a couple of weeks ago and there were a few good hills on that ride.
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Old 10-06-14, 08:19 PM
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Ride Mt Diablo when you get the 34T on. You can get close on BART. 10 miles of climbing, great views, then a fantastic twisting descent. (New tires and tubes, and brake pads, recommended.)
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Old 10-06-14, 08:34 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl View Post
Ride Mt Diablo when you get the 34T on. You can get close on BART. 10 miles of climbing, great views, then a fantastic twisting descent. (New tires and tubes, and brake pads, recommended.)
I am not staying very far from the North Gate to Mt Diablo. I wouldn't need to take BART. I did a hike up there a couple of months ago. 2000 feet of drop and then gain in a little over 7 miles. I was pretty wiped out at the end, but it was a fun day.
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