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Pinarello Fans, is this worth saving?

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Pinarello Fans, is this worth saving?

Old 10-19-14, 05:32 AM
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MiloFrance 
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Pinarello Fans, is this worth saving?

Withe the number of pantographs and the unusual BB shell, I would guess at 1970s, late. There are an extra set of bottle bosses on the ST which look aftermarket but quite well done. The seller didn't mention the driveside drop out but its a lovely looking frame from a quality pov.
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Old 10-19-14, 05:58 AM
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It wouldn't for me, but if it does for you, go for it. Just understand that it's a financial dog...if you do it, it's a labor of love. I like the added internal cable guides.
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Old 10-19-14, 06:27 AM
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Originally Posted by KonAaron Snake View Post
I like the added internal cable guides.
You thing they are an afterthought? Maybe at the same time as the extra bottle cage threads?
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Old 10-19-14, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by MiloFrance View Post
You thing they are an afterthought? Maybe at the same time as the extra bottle cage threads?
Probably.
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Old 10-19-14, 06:54 AM
  #5  
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I think the dropouts can be straightened and realigned, and the dropout screws can be straightened to the point where they can be removed.

You've been very careful to inspect the exterior rust, and my thought about it is that it's on the surface. However, you can view all the worst areas (BB and inside seat lug) by looking in with a flashlight. The exterior rust can be stabilized if it can be removed and the frame painted. I don't know how feasible it is to address internal rust.

Maybe there's a car restorer who has a good sized oxalic acid bath?

I don't think this is an extremely old Pina, but based on the dropouts and braze-ons I'd assume its early or middle '80s. It will certainly be a serviceable bike and even a fine ride once it's built. Do you have the fork? If you do I'd say it's worth the time. In those days forks were often designed to match the specific frame, on the better/top Italian frames like this.

Pull out the BB and feel inside - are the joints pinned? That would be another strong plus.

Keep in mind the parts for this (if you don't know) should all be Italian threaded. It should be marked on your BB, you can see it when you get it out and cleaned up.
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Old 10-19-14, 06:58 AM
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It's a Pinarello Montello. The internal cable guide and bottle mounts are original. That frame was made around 1990, and should have Columbus SLX tubing. I would jump at that frame if it was my size. Biggest concern would be bending the dropout back without snapping it off at the back threaded area.
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Old 10-19-14, 07:01 AM
  #7  
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Does the frame fit you well? If yes, see the previous posts in deciding what to do with it. If no, sell and move on, because you will not be able to recover any fix-up costs when selling it.
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Old 10-19-14, 07:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Old Yeller View Post
It's a Pinarello Montello. The internal cable guide and bottle mounts are original. That frame was made around 1990, and should have Columbus SLX tubing.
That young? Even with the metal cable guides under the BB? Seat tube external diameter is 28.6 without paint, which I think fits with SLX. Thanks Old Yeller.
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Old 10-19-14, 07:10 AM
  #9  
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It would be worth saving, for me, but only after consulting the one vendor I'd choose (see below)
Many here would not like the outcome, but I would. That's what you need to decide.

With the mix of painted/chromed and polished/non-polished chrome areas, it's going to be expensive, labor-intensive.
Even if you hire a pro, he/she is going to be irritated to no end, and charge likewise. I know I would.

You can blast/prep painted areas, easy enough with the right primers, but they're adjacent to chromed areas.
Not all the chromed areas are polished, so they're intended to be painted.
You can blast/prep those, but getting paint to adhere won't be a sure thing.

You have de-rust, but "what then?" of the polished chromed areas.
If you blast them and prep for painting, you are still going to have problems with paint adherence.
If you de-rust and polish them, you're going to have to mask and protect them for the remainder of all frame work.

Lotta work.

If you go with a powder-coater, you lose a lot of definition in the lugwork/pantos, more/less depending on the color you choose.
If you go with a painter, figure $800-$1000, and no guarantees. That's before decals/clear.

The first thing I'd do is travel to our somewhat local ceramic coater, and get a price on complete blast/prep/ceramic coating.
If I planned on preserving the chrome, I'd do that first, and then mask it twice, painstakingly, and then re-mask that with duct tape.
Then, I'd attack the rust, and even use a wire brush, files, and sandpaper, to actually "prep" for the blasting.
Then, if the ceramic coater so agreed, I'd have him blast it twice and then ceramic coat the frame in one color.
Hopefully, it would have the smoothness needed to not show so many defects once coated,and the coating would stick.
It may not come out as beautiful as, say, a Schwinn Tempo I saw him do (was show-worthy stunning), but it would have to do.
Then, decals and clear, and build it, and ride it.
Rarity? Absolutely. Fun? Sure. Value? No. Keeper? Yes. Attractive to purists? No. ..to hipsters? Maybe. ...to Me? Maybe.

I'd either be so tired of the whole exhausting process and fughettaboutit, or I'd build it and ride it with clenched teeth.
If the quality of ride and unique-ness of the frame overcomes that, great.
If not, post it on eBay for 2 years or whatever it takes that one other person who wants it to find it and pay.
Or maybe make some hipster's day, pull off the decals, and let him/her have a fixed gear like no other.

I really haven't given this much thought.
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Old 10-19-14, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by RobbieTunes View Post
It would be worth saving, for me, but only after consulting the one vendor I'd choose (see below)
Many here would not like the outcome, but I would. That's what you need to decide.

With the mix of painted/chromed and polished/non-polished chrome areas, it's going to be expensive, labor-intensive.
Even if you hire a pro, he/she is going to be irritated to no end, and charge likewise. I know I would.

You can blast/prep painted areas, easy enough with the right primers, but they're adjacent to chromed areas.
Not all the chromed areas are polished, so they're intended to be painted.
You can blast/prep those, but getting paint to adhere won't be a sure thing.

You have de-rust, but "what then?" of the polished chromed areas.
If you blast them and prep for painting, you are still going to have problems with paint adherence.
If you de-rust and polish them, you're going to have to mask and protect them for the remainder of all frame work.

Lotta work.

If you go with a powder-coater, you lose a lot of definition in the lugwork/pantos, more/less depending on the color you choose.
If you go with a painter, figure $800-$1000, and no guarantees. That's before decals/clear.

The first thing I'd do is travel to our somewhat local ceramic coater, and get a price on complete blast/prep/ceramic coating.
If I planned on preserving the chrome, I'd do that first, and then mask it twice, painstakingly, and then re-mask that with duct tape.
Then, I'd attack the rust, and even use a wire brush, files, and sandpaper, to actually "prep" for the blasting.
Then, if the ceramic coater so agreed, I'd have him blast it twice and then ceramic coat the frame in one color.
Hopefully, it would have the smoothness needed to not show so many defects once coated,and the coating would stick.
It may not come out as beautiful as, say, a Schwinn Tempo I saw him do (was show-worthy stunning), but it would have to do.
Then, decals and clear, and build it, and ride it.
Rarity? Absolutely. Fun? Sure. Value? No. Keeper? Yes. Attractive to purists? No. ..to hipsters? Maybe. ...to Me? Maybe.

I'd either be so tired of the whole exhausting process and fughettaboutit, or I'd build it and ride it with clenched teeth.
If the quality of ride and unique-ness of the frame overcomes that, great.
If not, post it on eBay for 2 years or whatever it takes that one other person who wants it to find it and pay.
Or maybe make some hipster's day, pull off the decals, and let him/her have a fixed gear like no other.

I really haven't given this much thought.
Wow Robbie, and thanks! Are you having a quiet Sunday?
If it was 2cm bigger I think I would go for it myself, but as it is, I think my best option having now seen and measured it is to get it to a decent state and pass it on. The guy who will eventually be painting my ***gin gave me an amazing price for a prep and coat, so I may ask him if he'll do this in the same colour to make it worth his while. Azzurro blue on a Pinarello? Why not...
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Old 10-19-14, 07:31 AM
  #11  
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From one 22 oz Yuengling.
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Old 10-19-14, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Old Yeller View Post
It's a Pinarello Montello. The internal cable guide and bottle mounts are original. That frame was made around 1990, and should have Columbus SLX tubing. I would jump at that frame if it was my size. Biggest concern would be bending the dropout back without snapping it off at the back threaded area.
I know I am late to the party here but I saw nothing on this frame that looked '70s.


I think if fits your first move is to build it and see how you like the ride. I had got to use a used Pinarello one spring and didn't care for it. The frame may have been pretty well used or more likely the geometry was just off for me. Bottom line is always ride before doing a lot of frame work. Your better off short selling an ugly frame then trying to get $400+ out of a repainted frame.
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Old 10-19-14, 08:39 AM
  #13  
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I see a very expensive project. Do you have the Fork? Chroming, painting and decals........$$$$$$
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Old 10-19-14, 09:11 AM
  #14  
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I agree with @Old Yeller as to what it is as I have a 91ish Montello with all those features. I love the ride and have started using it to commute. Early 90's was a transition time for Pin as there was a large demand to offer Dura Ace. Mine does and works great! Do I wish I had Record on it, absolutely but I can't imagine it would work any better. I do have a C Record headset though and it turns as well as any other headset!
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Old 10-19-14, 09:16 AM
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Masking off the existing Chrome , and having it Professionally repainted would make it look a lot better .

that Rt RR Dropout can be spread out again ..
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Old 10-19-14, 09:35 AM
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totally worth it to me, but i enjoy projects like this and have the tools, so that's a big leg up in the decision. I'd agree that the DO can be saved: leave the bent screw in place while bending and go slow prying it back, then remove the screw, the steel is generally malleable enough that you can bend without cracking, BUT, these DOs have been known to crack a lot, too, mainly at the web, but sometimes thru the screw hole.
I'd soak in oxalic and then see if the chrome is worth masking or if you have to lose some or all...then I'd give it the best rattlecan job I could and let it bake in a hot box "solar oven" to harden the paint...best bang for buck but not as nice as professional paint or as durable as thick, clogging powder coat, but cheaper than both.
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Old 10-19-14, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by unworthy1 View Post
totally worth it to me, but i enjoy projects like this and have the tools, so that's a big leg up in the decision. I'd agree that the DO can be saved: leave the bent screw in place while bending and go slow prying it back, then remove the screw, the steel is generally malleable enough that you can bend without cracking, BUT, these DOs have been known to crack a lot, too, mainly at the web, but sometimes thru the screw hole.
I'd soak in oxalic and then see if the chrome is worth masking or if you have to lose some or all...then I'd give it the best rattlecan job I could and let it bake in a hot box "solar oven" to harden the paint...best bang for buck but not as nice as professional paint or as durable as thick, clogging powder coat, but cheaper than both.
Fairly confident I can do the Do myself. 5 years of engineering in the early 80s must be useful somewhere in life... I have some 000 stainless wool I might give a quick rub with to see what happens.
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Old 10-19-14, 10:44 AM
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OK. So how would one go about spreading that dropout slot? Wedges?
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Old 10-19-14, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
OK. So how would one go about spreading that dropout slot? Wedges?
Carefully...

Not thought about it much yet, but will involve low heat and a bench vice somewhere...
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Old 10-19-14, 11:22 AM
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No need to apply heat to re-bend the DO, heat will just mess-up the surrounding chrome. Clamping lower half-of the DO in a bench vice would likely work but may leave marks on the outside chrome face if the vice does not have smooth jaws. I would first just try using a really big screwdriver inserted directly in the axle slot to pry open, this DO repair will be surprisingly easy so long as the DO does not crack from metal fatigue due to bending.
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Old 10-19-14, 11:23 AM
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If it was a Montello the whole body would be chromed.Am I mistaken that on the bulk of the frame the chrome is not evident?
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Old 10-19-14, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by MiloFrance View Post
Carefully...

Not thought about it much yet, but will involve low heat and a bench vice somewhere...
Go easy on the heat or you'll lose the nice chrome. As for the DO, I'd find a steel bar thick enough to just fit in the gap on the DO and long enough to get the leverage to pry it open. I would not clamp in I a bench vise for fear of destroying the chrome or nice smooth finish. Just go slow so you don't bend it too far.
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Old 10-19-14, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Old Yeller View Post
The internal cable guide and bottle mounts are original. That frame was made around 1990....
That's what I was thinking, too. Very late '80's or early '90's. The bb shell isn't unusual at all for Pinarello's, the same shell was used on lugged bikes, as far as I can tell, from the late '80's through the late '90's. I've got a '97 Pinarello Vuelta with the same shell. By then Pinarello used proprietary Deda tubing and Pinarello dropouts. The Campy dropouts and the type of internal brake cable routing indicate a much earlier bike than my '97 bike. I believe the bottom bracket shell was the one touted originally in the late '80's by Pinarello as their "bridgeless" bottom bracket shell, I believe Montello's from the very late '80's are shown with it in the catalog.
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Old 10-19-14, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by rootboy View Post
OK. So how would one go about spreading that dropout slot? Wedges?
I had to do it with a piece of pipe from a wall locker when my bike got bent in transit once. it is a simple operation and can be done with a big screwdriver or even channel lock pliers. The important thing is do it slowly.
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Old 10-19-14, 12:39 PM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Old Yeller View Post
Go easy on the heat or you'll lose the nice chrome. As for the DO, I'd find a steel bar thick enough to just fit in the gap on the DO and long enough to get the leverage to pry it open. I would not clamp in I a bench vise for fear of destroying the chrome or nice smooth finish. Just go slow so you don't bend it too far.
I use a large closed end wrench, and S L O W L Y bent them back, with the frame supported in a bike work stand.

Big project here, hopefully you have the fork too. It not, I might pass on this one.
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