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panic: my 15mm socket is missing and no able to tighten the crank bolt, any alt?

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panic: my 15mm socket is missing and no able to tighten the crank bolt, any alt?

Old 01-16-15, 05:02 PM
  #101  
onespeedbiker
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Originally Posted by cale View Post
Haha. You're back again. I hope you're feeling better. We're just having some fun while we wait to find out what happens to the crank arm.

Are you always so serious?
Mental self gratification= Troll
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Old 01-16-15, 05:05 PM
  #102  
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Originally Posted by onespeedbiker View Post
Mental self gratification= Troll
Mental self gratification = Intellect = Troll

There, fixed it for you. Haha.
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Old 01-16-15, 05:47 PM
  #103  
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Originally Posted by cale View Post
^On the contrary, this is exactly the point. Your illustrations may identify excellent tools. You say they are no longer in production. I would challenge that notion. The company that invented and first manufactured the tools may no longer make them but that doesn't mean that someone, somewhere, doesn't make them or something just like them. How do they straighten forks in India, China, Thailand, Poland, anywhere?

The point of my orginal post, and I'm entitled to be profuse because it was my point that you responded to, was that if a tool is really useful it almost always stays in production.

You want me to change my position to suit your whims. You want me to say that in will stay in production AT THE ORIGINAL SOURCE OF MANUFACTURE. I won't do that to suit your desire to call me wrong because it was never my intent to say this. I could care less who makes the tools I use, just that they remain available.
Bikesmith makes a cotter press. I have one. Park does, too, I believe. But both of those are very different from, and inferior to, the VAR cotter press, though the purpose is the same. Your initial argument was that that good, useful tools stay in production. There are many examples to the contrary. Now you say similar (possibly inferior) tools almost always stay in production. That's not me changing your views to my whims. That's a weak position at best. Who's making a heliocomatic lockring tool these days, you know the awesome one with the bottle opener? It took me forever to find a set of 671/672 Mavic headset wrenches since nobody is making those. Does anyone still make a Swiss-threaded BB tap? If you count tubular glue as a tool, I'd argue that nothing available today is as good as Clement was back in the day. Good, useful tools do not always stay in production: technology changes, there is less demand for the tool, cost of manufacture goes up, tool companies may go out of business, cheaper tools gain market dominance, etc., etc. Anyway, I don't want to belabor the point any longer. We'll agree to disagree about the accuracy of your argument.

Tonight I am going to patch some tubular tires with this:

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Old 01-16-15, 07:00 PM
  #104  
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^ I want to say that the Bikesmith press looks like an improvement over the VAR tool because it looks ingeniously simple compared to the complexity of the VAR tool. That it looks like it would be significantly less expensive to manufacture and sell and that, in and of itself, would appeal to anyone on a budget. I want to say these things but I can't because I don't know how well these presses work and I would, probably, be informed that no amount of "savings" is worth the hassle of using the "inferior" Bikesmith tool. I'm at a loss.

I do think you have a very nice table!
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Old 01-16-15, 07:31 PM
  #105  
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I've used a 19/32" socket in a pinch.
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Old 01-17-15, 09:55 PM
  #106  
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both work great. i especially like the Wrench Force tool. 12pt 15mm + 7mm allen. it's good ol' Snap-On made!

however. now i see 119mm Sugino asymmetrical BB spindle pushes drive side crank out way too far.
to keep the chain line 'sane', had to order another spindle in 113mm symmetric—seems to be the original spec for Race Face cranks.
found a Shimano 600 3H spindle on the fleabay cheap. the winter project is all about waiting waiting...


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Old 01-18-15, 04:51 AM
  #107  
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Originally Posted by cale View Post
^ I want to say that the Bikesmith press looks like an improvement over the VAR tool because it looks ingeniously simple compared to the complexity of the VAR tool.
The VAR no. 7 press will press the pins in a single operation, which makes it more suitable for mass production. Either will work in a repair/maintenance situation, but the Park/Bikesmith tools are less complex and expensive than the VAR.
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