Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Classic & Vintage
Reload this Page >

What are you doing today(C&V bicycle related)?

Classic & Vintage This forum is to discuss the many aspects of classic and vintage bicycles, including musclebikes, lightweights, middleweights, hi-wheelers, bone-shakers, safety bikes and much more.

What are you doing today(C&V bicycle related)?

Old 04-14-19, 07:29 PM
  #1251  
rccardr 
aka: Dr. Cannondale
 
rccardr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,177

Bikes: I'd rather not count how many, thank you

Mentioned: 133 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 952 Post(s)
Installed a new and different kind of front cable stop on Schwinderella so that I can change brake lever types.
Power tools were involved.
Look for a comprehensive update to be posted later this week when completed.

Also reassembled and polished the Davidson. It got packed up after Eroica without being cleaned, so it was quite a task. No damage, tho.
__________________
Hard at work in the Secret Underground Laboratory...
rccardr is offline  
Old 04-14-19, 08:05 PM
  #1252  
Slightspeed
Senior Member
 
Slightspeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 1,290

Bikes: 1964 Legnano Roma, 1973 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Raleigh Super Course, 1978 Peugeot PR10, 2002 Specialized Allez, 2007 Specialized Roubaix, 2013 Culprit Croz Blade

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 399 Post(s)
45 mile ride to Malibu and back on the '78 PR10. When I got home I saw I won an Ebay bid on a pair of Ballila brakes for a newly acquired Legnano GP. Never heard of Ballila before, but mine has a stripped screw that looks too short, and are pretty badly oxidized. Ebay ones look prettier, and have a release mechanism, so I hope they solve a couple of problems.

Peugeot at Magu Rock.


Problem screw.
Slightspeed is offline  
Old 04-15-19, 12:27 AM
  #1253  
RiddleOfSteel
Lugged, Dura-Ace Glory
 
RiddleOfSteel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,355

Bikes: '87 Schwinn Prologue - '74 Schwinn Paramount P15 - '8X Davidson Impulse - '89 Cannondale SR800 - '88 Masi Nuova Strada - '15 Cannondale CAAD10 Disc - '81 Trek 710 - '90 Cannondale ST400

Mentioned: 144 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 731 Post(s)
Completed converting my Davidson from a 2x10 dry weather bike to a 3x10, fendered, rain bike, complete with Shimano 6603 STI shifters, crankset, and 6600 long cage RD. The standardized chainring setup did not like a 26T small ring, nor a slightly used 39T middle ring in conjunction with 410mm chainstays. Back up to a pretty new 42T middle ring (even 10-speed specific, FWIW) and a 28T small ring. FD is dialed in and wasn't hard to set up. 12-27T cassette out back. VERY finicky! I would have really liked the entire chainring set to have been inboard another 2-3mm as I had the space. That would make the angle between the 27T cog and the 42T middle ring less extreme and prone to making the chain shift to the 24T cog when back pedaling.

For now though, everybody is playing nice, pedaling forwards and backwards (well, backwards 95% of the time). This is the first time I've had issue with this sort of thing on a triple as generally I've run triples on longer wheelbase bikes. Though the triples that I have had that were fine on road/race geometry frames, were either fully Campagnolo, or full Campagnolo with a FSA carbon triple crankset. At least the fenders clear the 23mm tires easily. The bike also looks pretty good too, so I'm hoping that will carry the day after a long build process over the last two days.

In other news, it's a tire re-shuffling, of which I have just two more to do.
RiddleOfSteel is offline  
Old 04-15-19, 02:48 PM
  #1254  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 36,731

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 398 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5159 Post(s)
@Slightspeed, good stuff. And I love California scenery. I've been to various parts of the state and loved all of it.

Balilla was around for a long time. Some lower end Bottecchia bikes had Balilla center pull brakes. They looked too thin to work well, but I'm told they're fine.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 04-15-19, 03:40 PM
  #1255  
non-fixie 
Shifting is fun!
 
non-fixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Holland, NL
Posts: 7,480

Bikes: Yes, please.

Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 954 Post(s)
Originally Posted by 3speedslow View Post
@non-fixie
Those levers are the kind you build a bike for. Very elegant and well made! (...)
Yes! I was thinking the same thing. It'l be a long term project, though, as all the other bits will have to have a comparable level of elegance and simplicity for it to work. A while back a beautiful Raleigh touring bike with upright bars came up for sale: my size, navy blue with gold lining, built with Reynolds 753. That would have been perfect. There was just the small matter if its €1,600 price tag ...
__________________
Second part of the ride: take me home, country roads!.
non-fixie is online now  
Old 04-15-19, 03:44 PM
  #1256  
non-fixie 
Shifting is fun!
 
non-fixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Holland, NL
Posts: 7,480

Bikes: Yes, please.

Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 954 Post(s)
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
@non-fixie, I collect stems, too, so I can make adjustments. It's gotten out of hand. I might have two dozen stems now. And of course, they don't have removable faceplates, so making changes is labor intensive.

(...)
Well, the upside is that stems don't take up much room. And instead of replacing the stem you can just build a new bike and address the other niggles at the same time.
__________________
Second part of the ride: take me home, country roads!.
non-fixie is online now  
Old 04-15-19, 09:33 PM
  #1257  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 36,731

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 398 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5159 Post(s)
Originally Posted by non-fixie View Post
Well, the upside is that stems don't take up much room. And instead of replacing the stem you can just build a new bike and address the other niggles at the same time.
I'm afraid to ask how many bikes you have. I bet you don't even know.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 04-16-19, 01:57 PM
  #1258  
non-fixie 
Shifting is fun!
 
non-fixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Holland, NL
Posts: 7,480

Bikes: Yes, please.

Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 954 Post(s)
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I'm afraid to ask how many bikes you have. I bet you don't even know.
I'm fairly sure I'm pretty close to N. I think.
__________________
Second part of the ride: take me home, country roads!.
non-fixie is online now  
Old 04-17-19, 11:49 AM
  #1259  
non-fixie 
Shifting is fun!
 
non-fixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: South Holland, NL
Posts: 7,480

Bikes: Yes, please.

Mentioned: 176 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 954 Post(s)
Delivered this to a coworker today. She'd told me earlier she'd planned a multi-day tour to Belgium for the Easter weekend. On her 55 lbs Cortina.

Took me 10 minutes to find this twilight zone beauty locally for €40. And another 30 minutes to pick it up. Cleaned it, set the saddle at the correct height and added a rack from my stash of decommissioned racks (don't like 'em).

__________________
Second part of the ride: take me home, country roads!.
non-fixie is online now  
Old 04-17-19, 02:32 PM
  #1260  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 1,379

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 2012 Soma Smoothie, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
What am I doing today? realizing hopeful optimism is no substitute for accurate measurements. The replacement fork I got off ebay was 2 cm longer in the steer tube than the original but the threaded section is the same 3 cm length for both meaning I don't have the threads needed to snug up the headset. Sigh.



no more threads
ryansu is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 03:32 PM
  #1261  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 3,602

Bikes: Merz, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, Cinelli SC and more

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 982 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
What am I doing today? realizing hopeful optimism is no substitute for accurate measurements. The replacement fork I got off ebay was 2 cm longer in the steer tube than the original but the threaded section is the same 3 cm length for both meaning I don't have the threads needed to snug up the headset. Sigh.



no more threads
Davidson or Rodrigez should be able to help.
merziac is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 03:48 PM
  #1262  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 1,379

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 2012 Soma Smoothie, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Originally Posted by merziac View Post
Davidson or Rodrigez should be able to help.
Thanks - I had the same thought - Here is the response I got from Davidson in response to my question about adding threads.

Sometimes you can add, but most times it doesn't work well. When it had to be done

no matter the cost and perfectly we have had a machinist do it at a cost of about

$200-250. So if it's a restoration of a valuable bike that might be right to do.

If not the case, start over more carefully.


I am taking the starting over option and chalking this one up to hard earned knowledge
ryansu is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 05:21 PM
  #1263  
Dean51 
Senior Member
 
Dean51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Olympic Peninsula, WA
Posts: 376

Bikes: '82 YKonno Allez, ~'80 Ron Cooper, '87 Ciocc Designer 84, '77 Schwinn Volare, '86 Tommasini Racing, Ciocc Mockba 80, '98 S-Works Hardtail Mtn., Nishiki Int'l Singlespeed

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 132 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
Thanks - I had the same thought - Here is the response I got from Davidson in response to my question about adding threads.

Sometimes you can add, but most times it doesn't work well. When it had to be done

no matter the cost and perfectly we have had a machinist do it at a cost of about

$200-250. So if it's a restoration of a valuable bike that might be right to do.

If not the case, start over more carefully.


I am taking the starting over option and chalking this one up to hard earned knowledge
I've successfully extended the threads on two steerer tubes. I added ~3/4" to a bike of my own and ~1/4" for the owner of my LBS. I used a VAR 40B tool that I purchased from a shop that was closing. The 3/4" project took me about 15 minutes to complete and the extra threads on both steerers blended in perfectly with the original threading. I would encourage you to keep looking for someone willing to take on the job.

Dean
__________________
Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die
Dean51 is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 05:28 PM
  #1264  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 3,602

Bikes: Merz, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, Cinelli SC and more

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 982 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
Thanks - I had the same thought - Here is the response I got from Davidson in response to my question about adding threads.

Sometimes you can add, but most times it doesn't work well. When it had to be done

no matter the cost and perfectly we have had a machinist do it at a cost of about

$200-250. So if it's a restoration of a valuable bike that might be right to do.

If not the case, start over more carefully.


I am taking the starting over option and chalking this one up to hard earned knowledge
Paging @gugie

@Dfrost may have some input as well.
merziac is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 06:03 PM
  #1265  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 1,379

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 2012 Soma Smoothie, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Originally Posted by merziac View Post
Paging @gugie

@Dfrost may have some input as well.
Actually @gugie was the first place I went and he very graciously rebent the original fork for the Cresta, after my crash, and it works and it rides just fine, its just feels different now more like a race bike than a tourer. So my thought was to find a replacement vintage Canti fork to see if I could recapture the feel of the tourer. I am learning allot about forks
ryansu is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 06:19 PM
  #1266  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 3,602

Bikes: Merz, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, Cinelli SC and more

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 982 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
Actually @gugie was the first place I went and he very graciously rebent the original fork for the Cresta, after my crash, and it works and it rides just fine, its just feels different now more like a race bike than a tourer. So my thought was to find a replacement vintage Canti fork to see if I could recapture the feel of the tourer. I am learning allot about forks
Alright, well I don't think it can hurt to try and thread the fork some more if it can be done without causing any harm. If it doesn't work out its below the normal level and could be ok. That will depend on the craftsman. I know fork threads are tricky so if Mark doesn't want to take it on you may be stuck. If'n it was me I would figure it out for myself, good bad or ugly, as a lifelong mechanic/technician I have fixed and saved most of the threaded debacles I have encountered but that's just me. Been very lucky on many occasions without a doubt.
merziac is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 06:39 PM
  #1267  
gugie 
Crapmaster Emeritus
 
gugie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 7,050

Bikes: JP Weigle'd Raleigh Competition reconstruct, 73 Raleigh Competition 650b'ed, 96 Bike Friday NWT, 83 Lotus Classique, 78 Centurion ProTour, 73 Raleigh Grand Sports

Mentioned: 709 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2049 Post(s)
@ryansu

Many places will not thread a steerer with a manual tool. The claim is that steerers are threaded on a lathe (true statement for new steerers), and you'll wear out the cutting tool. I thought this was the gospel, never cut the threads using a threading tool. The people that go to this church claim the manual tools are for chasing threads, not cutting new ones.

Then I took the UBI framebuilding class, and found that my frame and fork design required a longer threaded steerer than they had in stock. The head instructor found a longer threaded one, handed me the Park threading tool, and told me to have at it.

Bring me that fork, we'll chuck it with some frame clamps in a vice, and you can have at it with my tool. The thing that gets worn out are your arms...
__________________
If someone tells you that you have enough bicycles and you don't need any more, stop talking to them. You don't need that kind of negativity in your life.
gugie is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 06:39 PM
  #1268  
malcala622 
Senior Member
 
malcala622's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Pico Rivera, CA
Posts: 1,773

Bikes: Bianchi Trofeo/Sport SX/Limited/Giro.Tommasini Prestige. Bottecchia Cromor. Gios Torino. Torelli Strada?

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 457 Post(s)
The smallest details helps me see the big picture.

New O rings for the record calipers.

malcala622 is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 07:00 PM
  #1269  
ryansu 
Ride.Smile.Repeat
 
ryansu's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Seattle WA
Posts: 1,379

Bikes: 2009 Handsome Devil, 1978 Motobecane Grand Touring, 1987 Nishiki Cresta GT, Former bikes; 1986 Miyata Trail Runner, 1979 Miyata 912, 2011 VO Rando, 1999 Cannondale R800, 2012 Soma Smoothie, 1986 Schwinn Passage

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 361 Post(s)
Originally Posted by gugie View Post
@ryansu

Many places will not thread a steerer with a manual tool. The claim is that steerers are threaded on a lathe (true statement for new steerers), and you'll wear out the cutting tool. I thought this was the gospel, never cut the threads using a threading tool. The people that go to this church claim the manual tools are for chasing threads, not cutting new ones.

Then I took the UBI framebuilding class, and found that my frame and fork design required a longer threaded steerer than they had in stock. The head instructor found a longer threaded one, handed me the Park threading tool, and told me to have at it.

Bring me that fork, we'll chuck it with some frame clamps in a vice, and you can have at it with my tool. The thing that gets worn out are your arms...
Thanks Man have fork will Travel I will PM you.
ryansu is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 07:04 PM
  #1270  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 3,602

Bikes: Merz, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, Cinelli SC and more

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 982 Post(s)
Originally Posted by ryansu View Post
Thanks Man have fork will Travel I will PM you.
There you go, had a feeling Mark would step in.
merziac is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 07:09 PM
  #1271  
TenGrainBread 
Senior Member
 
TenGrainBread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,497
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 551 Post(s)
@ryansu Gugie is right. I have cut steerer threads with a die and it works fine. It works especially well if you already have some pre-existing threads to start the die down - this keeps the die straight and square with the steerer when it starts doing real cutting.

The dies are made of tool steel which is quite a bit harder than the alloy steels nice forks are made. Any claims that threads can't be cut with a die is nonsense. Yes, if you are working under very tight tolerances in a machine shop, a lathe will always cut cleaner threads, but that tight of a tolerance is not even close to being needed for steerer threads.

The only time to be careful with a die is with chrome-plated steerers. The chrome is very hard and might dull the die a bit, depending on the die.

Put either the die or the fork in a vise and make sure you have good leverage on whichever is not clamped down.
TenGrainBread is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 07:13 PM
  #1272  
TenGrainBread 
Senior Member
 
TenGrainBread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,497
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 551 Post(s)
Originally Posted by malcala622 View Post
The smallest details helps me see the big picture.

New O rings for the record calipers.
Very meticulous restoration. Can't wait to see the finished product!
TenGrainBread is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 10:24 PM
  #1273  
Dfrost 
Senior Member
 
Dfrost's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,330

Bikes: ‘87 Marinoni SLX Sports Tourer, ‘79 Miyata 912 by Gugificazione

Mentioned: 112 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 261 Post(s)
Originally Posted by gugie View Post
@ryansu

Many places will not thread a steerer with a manual tool. The claim is that steerers are threaded on a lathe (true statement for new steerers), and you'll wear out the cutting tool. I thought this was the gospel, never cut the threads using a threading tool. The people that go to this church claim the manual tools are for chasing threads, not cutting new ones.

Then I took the UBI framebuilding class, and found that my frame and fork design required a longer threaded steerer than they had in stock. The head instructor found a longer threaded one, handed me the Park threading tool, and told me to have at it.

Bring me that fork, we'll chuck it with some frame clamps in a vice, and you can have at it with my tool. The thing that gets worn out are your arms...
@merziac, I am amazed that you remembered that I was involved in a steerer tube threading project!

When I asked Elliott Bay Cycles to extend the treads on a replacement fork with a very long steerer tube, they said said they’d only add 1/2” maximum, while I was looking for much more (it was really long steerer, and I was putting it in a 60cm frame). I eventually found a shop that would do it with a die. It wasn’t a difficult process. @ryansu, the shop that did that extension was Alki Bike & Board, just up the street from you. But I also think @gugie would do a better job with appropriate cutting oil, etc.

However, I’ve learned why Elliott Bay would limit the thread extension - the stem expander puts high internal radial stresses on the steerer tube, and a conical-style expander concentrates those stresses in one a short length of the steerer. Imagine if that’s happening in the threaded, hence weakened, section of a steerer. I’m pretty sure that’s what happened to the steerer tube on @RiddleOfSteel’s ‘74 Paramount before his rescue and @gugie’s incredible fix. The steerer tube was broken just above the start of the threading, well below the top of the head tube. BTW, a wedge-style expander has the advantage of spreading the radial stress over a length of the steerer.

So if you do proceed with this fork with extended threads, it sure seems like a very long quill stem, such as the ever-popular Nitto Technomic, would be highly advisable, with a modified minimum insertion that keeps the expander wedge below any threads.
Dfrost is offline  
Old 04-17-19, 10:29 PM
  #1274  
malcala622 
Senior Member
 
malcala622's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Pico Rivera, CA
Posts: 1,773

Bikes: Bianchi Trofeo/Sport SX/Limited/Giro.Tommasini Prestige. Bottecchia Cromor. Gios Torino. Torelli Strada?

Mentioned: 51 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 457 Post(s)
Originally Posted by TenGrainBread View Post
Very meticulous restoration. Can't wait to see the finished product!
Me too but it'll be a few weeks before its done. A few pieces have yet to arrive.
malcala622 is offline  
Old 04-18-19, 12:04 AM
  #1275  
merziac
Senior Member
 
merziac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: PDX
Posts: 3,602

Bikes: Merz, Strawberry/Newlands, Gordon, Fuso/Moulton, Bornstein, Paisley, Paramounts, 3rensho, Moto TC, Raleigh Pro's, Marinoni, Cinelli SC and more

Mentioned: 79 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 982 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Dfrost View Post

@merziac, I am amazed that you remembered that I was involved in a steerer tube threading project!

When I asked Elliott Bay Cycles to extend the treads on a replacement fork with a very long steerer tube, they said said they’d only add 1/2” maximum, while I was looking for much more (it was really long steerer, and I was putting it in a 60cm frame). I eventually found a shop that would do it with a die. It wasn’t a difficult process. @ryansu, the shop that did that extension was Alki Bike & Board, just up the street from you. But I also think @gugie would do a better job with appropriate cutting oil, etc.

However, I’ve learned why Elliott Bay would limit the thread extension - the stem expander puts high internal radial stresses on the steerer tube, and a conical-style expander concentrates those stresses in one a short length of the steerer. Imagine if that’s happening in the threaded, hence weakened, section of a steerer. I’m pretty sure that’s what happened to the steerer tube on @RiddleOfSteel’s ‘74 Paramount before his rescue and @gugie’s incredible fix. The steerer tube was broken just above the start of the threading, well below the top of the head tube. BTW, a wedge-style expander has the advantage of spreading the radial stress over a length of the steerer.

So if you do proceed with this fork with extended threads, it sure seems like a very long quill stem, such as the ever-popular Nitto Technomic, would be highly advisable, with a modified minimum insertion that keeps the expander wedge below any threads.
Well to be honest, the first connect was geographic, couple that with your vast experience including this particular dilemma and knowing Dan and him had already worked with Mark, thought you would be able to help as well. Looks like Mark has stepped in as expected and you have added your expertise as well, all good, win, win.
merziac is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.