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getting nauseous after 40 miles

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getting nauseous after 40 miles

Old 06-08-15, 08:51 PM
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getting nauseous after 40 miles

i am a super Clyde but not in a bad shape. when i go out for a 40 miles ride with a good head Wind it happens sometime when i get back that i m nauseous. i ride at an average of 15-16 miles/h.

not sure why ?

any ideas , any tricks ?
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Old 06-08-15, 08:57 PM
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How many oz of fluid do you drink? How many hours is the ride and what are the temperatures?

Sounds like you are either riding too hard and/or drinking too much. Probably riding too hard. 15-16 mph into a strong headwind is a very, very hard effort.

Probably need to ease up. Ride with a HRM to pace yoruself
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Old 06-08-15, 09:07 PM
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the temp was around 77. the ride was about 2.5 hours i drank 2 x 21oz water.
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Old 06-08-15, 10:02 PM
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Originally Posted by dodgeboy8888
the temp was around 77. the ride was about 2.5 hours i drank 2 x 21oz water.
More water. Also, once you get past 1 hour, you really need to be taking in more than water. Gels, sports drinks, bars, fig newtons, apple, banana, almonds, SOMETHING.
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Old 06-09-15, 02:13 AM
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sounds like a light bonk.

Food, fuel, pacing
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Old 06-09-15, 05:31 AM
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ook so how much water should i be taking ? waht should be my eating intake ? i am always worried about eating because it kind of beat the purpose of trying to burn calories not take some in
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Old 06-09-15, 06:09 AM
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Once you start doing endurance level stuff such as long rides, food is no longer food, it's fuel. You are wise to be wary because one of the biggest mistakes people make when exercising is thinking the exercise justifies more food. But when you're going as hard as you are you are, you're muscles are working off stored carbs called glycogen, and at that level of effort you're going to exhaust those stores in an hour to two hours. So it definitely sounds like you're needing to refuel. That doesn't mean eat more (unless you're just getting way too few calories), but pace your eating a bit and spread it out more, especially during your ride.
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Old 06-09-15, 06:18 AM
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2.5 hours without eating anything? If you're going hard (it sounds like you are) that's not a good idea. As others have pointed out, take something to eat. Doesn't have to be something huge, PB+J, Fig Newtons (or as I like Fig Bars from the Dollar store, much cheaper!), fancy gels or energy bars (if you like burning cash as well as calories). You're getting lots of exercise, you deserve a snack, and your body needs it! At the very least stick some Gatorade in one of those bottles!
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Old 06-09-15, 07:11 AM
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Originally Posted by dodgeboy8888
ook so how much water should i be taking ? waht should be my eating intake ? i am always worried about eating because it kind of beat the purpose of trying to burn calories not take some in
Depending how hot it is and how much you're sweating, at least 24 oz an hour. After 30 minutes, one of those bottles should be something with electrolytes in it (I like Hammer Heed because it's very low sugar and calories). Should also take in some form of nutrition every 30-45 minutes if ride will be longer than an hour. I did a 2 hour 30-miler on Saturday and went through 3 1/2 bottles (1 pure water, the other 2 1/2 were watered down Gatorade because I couldn't get to the LBS for Heed), and 2 Hammer Gels. Also had a pre-ride serving of steel cut oats made in 1% lactose free milk. I only ride with two bottles so I planned a halfway point gas station stop to top off my water bottles and mix in some Gatorade G2 powder (MUCH cheaper that way!)
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Old 06-09-15, 07:21 AM
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What sort of terrain? What was the humidity level?
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Old 06-09-15, 08:21 AM
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Have you checked your blood sugar? If it's not dehydration, which it probably is, you could be getting hypoglycemic. If a snickers bar cures it, you might want to monitor your glucose levels before, and when the symptoms start.
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Old 06-09-15, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by dodgeboy8888
ook so how much water should i be taking ?
Best way is to figure it out, we're all different. Weigh yourself before you leave, and again when you get back (same clothes and same scales). Water weighs a pound a pint. If you've lost more than a pound or so, drink more.
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Old 06-09-15, 03:14 PM
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I ride slower than you, and I typically carry 2-3 24 ounce bottles with me, and drink before and after the ride. I also tend to eat at least a little bit on the ride to maintain my energy level. Usually fruit or some form of nuts/seeds...

Another sign that you may not be drinking enough is the color of your urine after a ride. The darker it is, the more your body is trying to retain water to keep from going critical.

Reading this thread, I realize that I need to find a good electrolyte drink... imbalance of electrolytes might be part of why I get excessive muscle fatigue after a couple of hours.
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Old 06-09-15, 03:23 PM
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Thx guys I will try these tricks
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Old 06-09-15, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by bassjones
More water. Also, once you get past 1 hour, you really need to be taking in more than water. Gels, sports drinks, bars, fig newtons, apple, banana, almonds, SOMETHING.
While the original poster might need to eat on short rides that belief is not universally true and leads to many cyclists overeating when riding.

Bonking comes from depleting your glycogen stores. Increased fitness, reduced (this is relative) intensity, and lower carb diets mean more energy comes from fat and less from glycogen so those go farther without problems.

I don't eat on 3-4 hour endurance rides, but bring a Clif bar just in case. I do eat on rides like that when climbing at a harder pace because that makes me hungry. I don't eat on 1-2 hour rides regardless of intensity.

At some point you run out, and given absorption limits and the potential for gastrointestinal distress you're better off staying ahead of the drain - although that point is farther than many people think.

Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 06-09-15 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 06-09-15, 09:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt
While the original poster might need to eat on short rides that belief is not universally true and leads to many cyclists overeating when riding.

Bonking comes from depleting your glycogen stores. Increased fitness, reduced (this is relative) intensity, and lower carb diets mean more energy comes from fat and less from glycogen so those go farther without problems.

I don't eat on 3-4 hour endurance rides, but bring a Clif bar just in case. I do eat on rides like that when climbing at a harder pace because that makes me hungry. I don't eat on 1-2 hour rides regardless of intensity.

At some point you run out, and given absorption limits and the potential for gastrointestinal distress you're better off staying ahead of the drain - although that point is farther than many people think.
This is an excellent point - I do a very similar plan. I don't eat on rides less than 40 miles. When I do eat, it usually have some salted cashews. Nearly every bonk I have had is related to not drinking enough fluids.
I find that I need to replace fluids well before I am "thirsty" and I usually try to have 2 bottles every 20 miles.

My recommendation is to increase fluid intake to about 2X what you are doing now AND make sure you are well hydrated BEFORE the ride starts.
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Old 06-10-15, 05:24 AM
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How accurate is my fitness pal with calories for bicking im getting a number ike 3000 cal for 2.5h ?
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Old 06-10-15, 05:54 AM
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Lots of threads on that. It grossly overestimates calories burned. 60% or so.
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Old 06-10-15, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt
While the original poster might need to eat on short rides that belief is not universally true and leads to many cyclists overeating when riding.

Bonking comes from depleting your glycogen stores. Increased fitness, reduced (this is relative) intensity, and lower carb diets mean more energy comes from fat and less from glycogen so those go farther without problems.
Are you famiar with Metabolic Efficiency? It sounds very much like that approach. It very much goes against the grain of the popular approach to carb loading, energy drinks, and gels and the like. There's a lot of science and research supporting low carb training. One of the huge advantages when it's done right is that the whole issue of refueling during rides is moot because you have trained your body to burn fat rather than glycogen.

Having said that, I do think the OP does AT THIS TIME need to eat during rides. I believe your approach works, and in fact IMO it's a better approach, but it only works as part of an overall diet and training approach. The key to its effectiveness, at least from a Metabolic Efficiency approach, is keeping a steady blood sugar. Training focuses on keeping heart rate primarily at a fat burning stage. Diet focuses on keeping steady blood sugar, which you cannot do with high sugar diet or with carb loading. It all has to work together to be effective. If you are eating a high carb diet, even at a fat burning stage you are still more likely to deplete your glycogen stores. If what you are doing is what I think, it's an extremely effective way to go but it's only effective if one commits to the total approach.
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Old 06-10-15, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by bassjones
Lots of threads on that. It grossly overestimates calories burned. 60% or so.
Are you telling me that I actually didn't burn 4900 calories in my hour and a half ride last night?
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Old 06-10-15, 07:54 AM
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That's what I'm telling you.
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Old 06-10-15, 08:09 AM
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So then I am guessing you are telling me I shouldn't have eaten that full pizza then in celebration
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Old 06-10-15, 03:27 PM
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so 60% is still lot's around 1800 cal for that 2.5h ride.
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Old 06-14-15, 04:39 PM
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Went out again today for my 40 miles .drank 3 bottles instead of 2 including 1 with g2 in it. And had almonds during the ride . Happy to report felt great
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Old 06-15-15, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by dodgeboy8888
ook so how much water should i be taking ? waht should be my eating intake ? i am always worried about eating because it kind of beat the purpose of trying to burn calories not take some in
Uhm, just the opposite... Fat burns in a carbohydrate flame.

A hundred or so calories / hour of easily digestible carbs will stretch out your rides for several hours. Burning FAR total cals, and obtw having tremendous health benefits.

Your body will adapt to you going farther faster w/ less food while riding, but it takes time and miles and miles...


So have fun!

<edit>

Ps. we use dried fruits... You'll be amazed at just how good they taste when you need it...
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