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6'6" 600lbs need help finding a bike

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6'6" 600lbs need help finding a bike

Old 06-11-15, 03:38 AM
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6'6" 600lbs need help finding a bike

Hi everyone looking to try riding. I am still fairly active hunting, fishing, walking, not as much as I should admittedly. I live on beautiful Mississippi Gulf Coast so I would like to start enjoying it more with a nice ride. Looking for info on bikes that can handle my size that are a comfortable ride. I realize it's not going to be cheap but it's investing in my health.
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Old 06-11-15, 05:43 AM
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Definitely won't be cheap... Check out Zinn cycles and give them a call. It may require you losing a hundred lbs or more. There are some heavy duty bikes for guys your weight and there are bikes for guys your height, but aside from going with a custom frame and custom, hand built wheels, I don't know that you're going to find an off the shelf option for your particular combination of height and weight. I'm 6'5" and was 420 when I started. I was pushing the weight limit on my bike and had some heavy duty "big boy" wheels built up. You're 2" taller and 200 lbs heavier... Zinn may be able to hook you up though.
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Old 06-11-15, 06:16 AM
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I wonder if the guys over at dirtysixer.com could help you out. They specialize is bikes for tall dudes and customization. I'm betting they should be able to help out if you contact them.

their website is pretty sparse, but they do have some photos of the kinds of bikes they can do.
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Old 06-11-15, 07:49 AM
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cycling seems to be the ideal exercise for someone your size. You probably will have to get tandem wheels. Maybe an adult tricycle is the way to start
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Old 06-11-15, 08:09 AM
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You would probably need to get a trike to start with, something like m2020-3cb
the recumbent trikes max at 400 lb and there are only a few models the do 400. You might try a spin class until you get the weight down. The heavy duty industrial trikes are rated at 550 lbs but still should work. The main thing is getting on something to get you peddling, I'm a big guy as well at 400 and it is hard to find something. I want other bikes and trikes than what I have but those are not rated for my weight so I'm riding what I have until I get down to those limits.
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Old 06-11-15, 08:27 AM
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The problem I see is that at 6'6", bikes that fit properly and will allow comfortable riding are kinda rare, and heavier-duty bikes that can handle 600 lbs AND fit a 6'6" rider are even more so.

I am tempted to recommend a rigid mountain bike with wheels upgraded to use 48 spokes (tandem wheels), at least in the rear, but I would like to hear from some other 500lb + rider who has good experience with a standard frame. I suspect it shouldn't be a problem, but I have no direct knowledge. Most bikes have published weight limits of less than 300 lbs, but many people have ridden these bikes at 400 lbs + without issue. THe main problem is usually the wheels.

If you are ready to drop the cash, you can get a custom frame made to handle your weight, and this would also be a great way to go to get a bike that fits for your height, too, but this will be a much more expensive process than buying and upgrading an off-the-rack bike.
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Old 06-11-15, 08:39 AM
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The other issue I see with a custom frame is this: as you lose weight, especially if you get under 250, that heavy duty custom frame is now going to be a plain old HEAVY frame that you'll want to upgrade from
to something lighter. The used market for a bicycle frame made for someone 6'7" and 600 lbs is going to be slim to none. You could always convert it to a touring bike or something, but it'll still be heavy as heck. Wonder if a Long Haul Trucker could handle that much weight... They come in tall sizes and are built for loaded touring. That might be an affordable option if it can take the weight, and have some beefy wheels built up - Velocity Chukkers with 48 spokes or something...
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Old 06-11-15, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by bassjones
The other issue I see with a custom frame is this: as you lose weight, especially if you get under 250, that heavy duty custom frame is now going to be a plain old HEAVY frame that you'll want to upgrade from
to something lighter. The used market for a bicycle frame made for someone 6'7" and 600 lbs is going to be slim to none. You could always convert it to a touring bike or something, but it'll still be heavy as heck. Wonder if a Long Haul Trucker could handle that much weight... They come in tall sizes and are built for loaded touring. That might be an affordable option if it can take the weight, and have some beefy wheels built up - Velocity Chukkers with 48 spokes or something...
Even super-heavy duty Worksman bikes are only rated up to 500lbs "stationary weight". Nothing off-the-shelf is going to work for a 600lb rider, unless they are willing to risk the chance of it breaking.

FYI a LHT is rated up to 300lbs total.
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Old 06-11-15, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by dr_lha
Even super-heavy duty Worksman bikes are only rated up to 500lbs "stationary weight". Nothing off-the-shelf is going to work for a 600lb rider, unless they are willing to risk the chance of it breaking.

True, but many people vastly exceed the weight limits of their standard bicycles without problem. It is not an unreasonable assumption that the same could be done with a Worksman. Except that I don't think a Worksman bike (or trike) would be comfortable for a 6'6" rider.
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Old 06-11-15, 08:49 AM
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I'd get a nice trike.



I'm not sure it's rated for 600#, but one of those has a better chance of meeting that target than would a two-wheeler.
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Old 06-11-15, 08:54 AM
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I looked around for trikes, and the highest rating I could find was for a terratrike rover at 400 lbs. plus, most trikes have a crank arm that is only so long, so for a dude as tall as OP it would also likely need to be custom.
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Old 06-11-15, 08:54 AM
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The Workman's are rated for 550 lbs plus.

"Carrying Capacity: 550 Lbs**

Many upgrades and choices are available to customize your Worksman Industrial Tricycle.
**Notes about Carrying Capacities: While other companies put unfounded inflated weight capacity figures based upon no facts, we at Worksman Cycles actually put weight capacities far less than the true capabilities of the cycles, as we take into consideration not only what the cycle will be able to hold, but what is a safe operational weight. Worksman Industrial Tricycles are simply more durable than other brands and have a 100+ year track record to prove it. Specifications subject to change without notice"
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Old 06-11-15, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Wilfred Laurier
True, but many people vastly exceed the weight limits of their standard bicycles without problem. It is not an unreasonable assumption that the same could be done with a Worksman.
I'd be happy applying that logic to a 275lb guy on a bike with a 250lb weight limit. 600lb rider is so far out of the ballpark though, I would really not like to say. Honestly I don't think a bicycle is really what the OP needs.
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Old 06-11-15, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by baron von trail
I'd get a nice trike.



I'm not sure it's rated for 600#, but one of those has a better chance of meeting that target than would a two-wheeler.
The ICE is rated for 325 lbs.... sad not many heavy rated trikes.

I have a Terra Trike Rover rated at 400 lbs, I like it but its not really what I want. But it will get the weight off until I can get into something smaller. I ride a 02' Giant Boulder SE that does well, I never have hurt it under my 400 lb weight.
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Old 06-11-15, 09:29 AM
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I'd look into a stationary bike to get started, Stairmaster™ makes a good one that is prorated for up to 600# IIRC. Maybe join a gym if you're not too self conscious, just remember no matter how the gym rats look at you, all that matters is that you show up and are doing your best to improve your current situation. :-) Once you are down at least 100 pounds your options should open up.

Once you get below 500#, you should be able to find a rigid framed mountain bike *cheap* and invest a couple hundred on well built wheels for it :-)
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Old 06-11-15, 03:12 PM
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I agree with Workman cycles. Call them and ask for their advice. 800 962 BIKE(2453)
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Old 06-12-15, 02:57 AM
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Thanks a million guys. Sorry I didn't get back sooner. I am a tow boat captain so a gym membership is kinda a waste cause I am only home for 2 weeks at a time. I have been looking at trikes and I am probably going to go that way. I am still going to call the places each of you recommended just to see. I never realized how many options there is in biking equipment. When I get home I am going to look up a bike shop. Anyone know of any in the New Orleans or Mississippi Gulf Coast area? Thanks again
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Old 06-12-15, 04:56 AM
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Is it possible to bring a stationary bike onto your boat? And use it?

Is your riding area flat or hilly?

The sky is the limit for bike prices. However, personally I would probably go cheap. Then if the bike crumbles, either fix what breaks, or buy another bike if you like the first one. If the bike ends up sitting in the garage unused, then you aren't out much money.

A couple to consider:
Walmart 32" single speed cruiser.
32" Kent Men's Beach Cruiser Bike, Green - Walmart.com

Maybe a fat tire bike.
26" Kent Men's Devastator 7-speed Fat Tire Bike, Multiple Colors - Walmart.com
26" Mongoose Hitch Men's All-Terrain Fat Tire Bike, Red - Walmart.com
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Old 06-12-15, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by bassjones
The other issue I see with a custom frame is this: as you lose weight, especially if you get under 250, that heavy duty custom frame is now going to be a plain old HEAVY frame that you'll want to upgrade from
to something lighter. The used market for a bicycle frame made for someone 6'7" and 600 lbs is going to be slim to none. You could always convert it to a touring bike or something, but it'll still be heavy as heck. Wonder if a Long Haul Trucker could handle that much weight... They come in tall sizes and are built for loaded touring. That might be an affordable option if it can take the weight, and have some beefy wheels built up - Velocity Chukkers with 48 spokes or something...
I've got Phil Wood disc Tandem 48 sp on chuckkers (700c) for a built up Disc Trucker.
I was running 38's front and rear, now down to 240, and can skip carrying about 8 lbs of water, 32/38...
They are way over built for me but ride like a dream and still dead true. I'll carry the extra to be reliable. But I was 285, so figure ~370 GVR...

Discs will surely help you stop, long downhills and mass... Brakes are important...
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Old 06-12-15, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by MikeRides
I'd look into a stationary bike to get started, Stairmaster™ makes a good one that is prorated for up to 600# IIRC. Maybe join a gym if you're not too self conscious, just remember no matter how the gym rats look at you, all that matters is that you show up and are doing your best to improve your current situation. :-) Once you are down at least 100 pounds your options should open up.

Once you get below 500#, you should be able to find a rigid framed mountain bike *cheap* and invest a couple hundred on well built wheels for it :-)
As a gym rat (sadly reformed), when they look at you they're thinking something along the lines of being glad your there... Wondering if they could/should save you from the trainers who seem to think that the more they push you the more you've gotten your moneys worth... Neglecting the fact that the intensity will likely injure you such that you won't/can't be back... Puzzled why new people seem to think it has to be a gymnastic achievement to be effective when the big six will do wonders for anybody for the first few years...

Stuff like that...

Most of those who are there will be happy to see you make 3 months, knowing that if you make 3 months you'll likely make 2 years... and by then you're hooked...
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Old 06-12-15, 11:44 AM
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^Particularly when you've got somebody like me (or I'm sure a lot of us in this subforum), who may be further down the path, but remember being where you're at right now, and will gladly offer guidance and support. Don't go to a Gold's and avoid Planet F...(too far the other direction...a gym with a Pizza night?!?!), but most other places aren't full of 20-something hard bodies or a bunch of people who want to look like they're working out without actually doing anything...
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Old 06-12-15, 11:48 AM
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Wow! I used to be a gym rat. Could you generalize any more? (That's a rhetorical question.)
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Old 06-12-15, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by yumpc75
Thanks a million guys. Sorry I didn't get back sooner. I am a tow boat captain so a gym membership is kinda a waste cause I am only home for 2 weeks at a time. I have been looking at trikes and I am probably going to go that way.
Tow boat captain? Well, that complicates things. What's your work schedule like? Are you towing barges down the river for a week at a time or how does that work and when would you have a chance to use a bike? Do you have any down time to exercise and if so, are you tied up or is somebody else driving the tug while you're "off"?

Heck, skip the bike and get a dinghy and row that sucker around. No weight restrictions and plenty of exercise doing that.
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Old 06-12-15, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Null66
As a gym rat (sadly reformed), when they look at you they're thinking something along the lines of being glad your there... Wondering if they could/should save you from the trainers who seem to think that the more they push you the more you've gotten your moneys worth... Neglecting the fact that the intensity will likely injure you such that you won't/can't be back... Puzzled why new people seem to think it has to be a gymnastic achievement to be effective when the big six will do wonders for anybody for the first few years...

...
I don't think you've reformed. We've seen your ride log which has more weight entries than ride entries.


To the OP, the bike that mentions a 550# limit will probably work for you.

I can imagine with your weight that walking can be painful for your knees and ankles, and that jogging is right out of the question. I know that jogging/running is painful on my knees and ankles at 250#. That's one of the reasons why I bought a bike. It's a lot easier on my knees than running/jogging, and it takes a lot of walking to get a good workout.

Just start riding, my first few rides were only 1.2 mi. That was in April. Now I'll do a spirited (for me) 11 mi ride in the morning, and then do a 5.5 mi leisurely ride with my wife in the evening. And I'm tying to add more hills. I hate them, but what doesn't kill you makes you stronger (or is it weirder?). And the hills that I was already doing, I try to do a little faster.

GH

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Old 06-12-15, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
Heck, skip the bike and get a dinghy and row that sucker around. No weight restrictions and plenty of exercise doing that.
Put a scull seat into a rowboat, and you'll have a good workout.

Westcoast 11.6 Single Slide Seat Sculling Rowboat - Whitehall Rowing & Sail

Whew... not the cheapest boat in the world. But, it could double as a liferaft/dingy.

How is personal space on the boat?

If you want to go the custom route, perhaps contact a small frame builder and see if they wish to take on the project. For example Bike Friday. that makes semi-custom folding bikes here in the USA.
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