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Saddle Question

Old 08-26-15, 05:22 AM
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scott757
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Saddle Question

I bought a big, comfy C9 saddle for my bike at the suggestion of the LBS where I purchased my bike. They suggested the saddle because I was starting out and they thought it'd be more comfortable given my experience and size. I've not had any issues with it and it has been comfortable. However, last night I was riding with a friend who works at a different LBS and he suggested that I get a smaller saddle because it'll get me in a better position on the bike and it will help relieve the pressure on my hands. Right now my hands hurting are the only thing that really bothering me. After riding for about 30 mins some of my fingers are tingling/going numb. What are your thoughts on this? Would getting a smaller, less cushy saddle possibly help? If so what are some suggestions? I've included a link to my current saddle for reference.


Current saddle:
Amazon.com : Cloud-9 Saddle C9 GS CRU VAR ES BK-EM 11.25x9 : Bike Saddles And Seats : Sports & Outdoors
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Old 08-26-15, 05:27 AM
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What type of bike do you ride?
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Old 08-26-15, 05:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Wingsprint View Post
What type of bike do you ride?
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Old 08-26-15, 06:29 AM
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I doubt that a new seat is going to help your hands much. It does look like the nose of the seat is pointed down some and that would push you forward onto the handlebars more.

I'm assuming that you have some good padded gloves. Make sure that they are too tight. I've made that mistake. Take your hands off of the handlebars every so often and shake them out. Also make sure that you don't have a 'death grip' on the handlebars.

I sympathize. I've had hand problems for years. Aerobars have helped me out the most by taking pressure completely off my hands for a while.
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Old 08-26-15, 07:04 AM
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My handlebars are thin so I used a foam grip set and then bar taped over them. I recently re-wrapped my bars without the foam and I am missing it.

something like this https://www.amazon.com/Grab-Comfort-D...=foam+grip+set
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Old 08-26-15, 07:14 AM
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Were you fit on the bike? Saddle looks pretty far back on the rails.
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Old 08-26-15, 07:17 AM
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Originally Posted by JerrySTL View Post
I doubt that a new seat is going to help your hands much. It does look like the nose of the seat is pointed down some and that would push you forward onto the handlebars more.

I'm assuming that you have some good padded gloves. Make sure that they are too tight. I've made that mistake. Take your hands off of the handlebars every so often and shake them out. Also make sure that you don't have a 'death grip' on the handlebars.

I sympathize. I've had hand problems for years. Aerobars have helped me out the most by taking pressure completely off my hands for a while.
Maybe I bought the wrong pair of super padded gloves, but I bought the most padded pair of Bontrager gloves from LBS and they made it worse. It seemed that the pressure on the pads compressed them to the point of adding to the problem. It felt like I had hard lumps under my hands instead of a cushy grip.
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Old 08-26-15, 07:47 AM
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Originally Posted by scott757 View Post
Maybe I bought the wrong pair of super padded gloves, but I bought the most padded pair of Bontrager gloves from LBS and they made it worse. It seemed that the pressure on the pads compressed them to the point of adding to the problem. It felt like I had hard lumps under my hands instead of a cushy grip.
More padding isn't always better as it can result in nerve compression.

Try using batting or driving or golf or other less or not padded gloves for a few rides.
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Old 08-26-15, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by ShortLegCyclist View Post
More padding isn't always better as it can result in nerve compression.

Try using batting or driving or golf or other less or not padded gloves for a few rides.
I have a pair of general exercise gloves with very light padding. I've been wearing those and that helped, but didn't fix it entirely.
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Old 08-26-15, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by scott757 View Post
I have a pair of general exercise gloves with very light padding. I've been wearing those and that helped, but didn't fix it entirely.
If that helped, it does imply that the heavier padding isn't the right choice for you. Either tilting your saddle slightly nose up or raising your handlebars would be the next thing I would try, to unweight your hands.
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Old 08-26-15, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by JReade View Post
Were you fit on the bike? Saddle looks pretty far back on the rails.
I am wondering if this frame is too small. The saddle looks way back, which could have been an attempt to reduce pressure on the hands. Also, use of that stem results in an extremely short reach to the bars, which could result in being crunched up on the bike and the arms supporting too much body weight.

OP- How tall are you? What size frame is that?
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Old 08-26-15, 08:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Wingsprint View Post
I am wondering if this frame is too small. The saddle looks way back, which could have been an attempt to reduce pressure on the hands. Also, use of that stem results in an extremely short reach to the bars, which could result in being crunched up on the bike and the arms supporting too much body weight.

OP- How tall are you? What size frame is that?
I'm 5'10". Short legs. Long frame. I believe this is a 52cm frame.
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Old 08-26-15, 08:21 AM
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Originally Posted by scott757 View Post
I'm 5'10". Short legs. Long frame. I believe this is a 52cm frame.
If it's a 52 and you are 5'10", I agree it's too small. Your saddle should be level, but otherwise it won't help your hands. Your rear may like a narrower saddle. And your hands will appreciate some good cycling gloves.

I would strongly suggest a bike fit.

I like to ride on the hoods, with them level with the bar. Riding on your hoods it looks like you would be putting more weight on the hands. (Numbness is caused by putting too much pressure/weight on the hands.) Let your butt support your weight and keep a light grip on the bars. And frequently change positions with the hands.

Again get a bike fit from a good bike shop.
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Old 08-26-15, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Cychologist View Post
If it's a 52 and you are 5'10", I agree it's too small. Your saddle should be level, but otherwise it won't help your hands. Your rear may like a narrower saddle. And your hands will appreciate some good cycling gloves.

I would strongly suggest a bike fit.

I like to ride on the hoods, with them level with the bar. Riding on your hoods it looks like you would be putting more weight on the hands. (Numbness is caused by putting too much pressure/weight on the hands.) Let your butt support your weight and keep a light grip on the bars. And frequently change positions with the hands.

Again get a bike fit from a good bike shop.
So the answer is get a new bike?
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Old 08-26-15, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by scott757 View Post
I'm 5'10". Short legs. Long frame. I believe this is a 52cm frame.
A 52 cm road bike is a small frame. It may fit your legs but it's not fitting your torso. You are all hunched up and putting most of your weight on your hands rather than using your core muscles to hold yourself up. You need a larger frame with a better standover height. A sloping top tube bike in a "56cm" would fit you better. The "56cm" really isn't the length of the seat tube but is the length of a virtual seat tube. However, the top tube is proportionally longer on that kind of bike.

Something is hinky with the Haro website, however. They say that a 53cm frame has an effective top tube of 597mm with a head angle of 70.5 and a seattube angle of 74.5. That a slack headtube angle and a very steep seattube angle which should make the bike have a very short top tube...which you can see in your picture. A Trek 1.1 has a head angle of 72.8 and a seat angle of 73.7 for a 54cm bike with a toptube length of 543mm. I don't think that the Haro's toptube is 54mm or 2.1" longer than the Trek with that slack a head angle.

Either way, you would benefit from a slightly larger bike with a longer top tube.
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Old 08-26-15, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
A 52 cm road bike is a small frame. It may fit your legs but it's not fitting your torso. You are all hunched up and putting most of your weight on your hands rather than using your core muscles to hold yourself up. You need a larger frame with a better standover height. A sloping top tube bike in a "56cm" would fit you better. The "56cm" really isn't the length of the seat tube but is the length of a virtual seat tube. However, the top tube is proportionally longer on that kind of bike.

Something is hinky with the Haro website, however. They say that a 53cm frame has an effective top tube of 597mm with a head angle of 70.5 and a seattube angle of 74.5. That a slack headtube angle and a very steep seattube angle which should make the bike have a very short top tube...which you can see in your picture. A Trek 1.1 has a head angle of 72.8 and a seat angle of 73.7 for a 54cm bike with a toptube length of 543mm. I don't think that the Haro's toptube is 54mm or 2.1" longer than the Trek with that slack a head angle.

Either way, you would benefit from a slightly larger bike with a longer top tube.
Getting a new bike isn't really an option at this point.
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Old 08-26-15, 08:45 AM
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Originally Posted by scott757 View Post
I'm 5'10". Short legs. Long frame. I believe this is a 52cm frame.
Based on the geometry of those frames, I am thinking the frame is too small. If you cant change the frame now, you could try a seat post with a bunch of setback along with a longer stem. But understand this is not a good solution...
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Old 08-26-15, 09:16 AM
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Longer stem? Setback seatpost? I seriously doubt that moving from a 52cm to a 54cm (or even a 56cm) frame would solve all of your problems. Moving the seat back 1-2cm and the bars forward 1-2cm would be the same as a 2-4cm longer top tube. Will the fit be perfect? No. Is it doable for a little money? Sure.

As a person who has dealt with tingly fingers, it's all about the saddle to bar drop-- you're resting more weight on your hands than your hands are happy with. If you don't have discomfort in the elbows or shoulders, it might be a "toughen up" situation. As my core strength increases, the number of times my hands get numb decreases. Many rides I have zero hand discomfort, despite my saddle being almost 1.5" higher than when I started riding (increased flexibility.) As to the Cloud9, with my first saddle, I found that I was unconsciously putting more weight on my hands and feet because my butt didn't want to rest all of my weight on the saddle-- so even though your seat is padded, your body might not like it, and you're transferring weight without even noticing it.
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Old 08-26-15, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Longer stem? Setback seatpost? I seriously doubt that moving from a 52cm to a 54cm (or even a 56cm) frame would solve all of your problems. Moving the seat back 1-2cm and the bars forward 1-2cm would be the same as a 2-4cm longer top tube. Will the fit be perfect? No. Is it doable for a little money? Sure.

As a person who has dealt with tingly fingers, it's all about the saddle to bar drop-- you're resting more weight on your hands than your hands are happy with. If you don't have discomfort in the elbows or shoulders, it might be a "toughen up" situation. As my core strength increases, the number of times my hands get numb decreases. Many rides I have zero hand discomfort, despite my saddle being almost 1.5" higher than when I started riding (increased flexibility.) As to the Cloud9, with my first saddle, I found that I was unconsciously putting more weight on my hands and feet because my butt didn't want to rest all of my weight on the saddle-- so even though your seat is padded, your body might not like it, and you're transferring weight without even noticing it.
This seems to make sense. I don't have any issues with my shoulders or elbows. So maybe it is just a deal with it thing. I also found a stem riser that I might try. But we'll see what happens.
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Old 08-26-15, 10:38 AM
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Originally Posted by scott757 View Post
I bought a big, comfy C9 saddle for my bike at the suggestion of the LBS where I purchased my bike. They suggested the saddle because I was starting out and they thought it'd be more comfortable given my experience and size. I've not had any issues with it and it has been comfortable. However, last night I was riding with a friend who works at a different LBS and he suggested that I get a smaller saddle because it'll get me in a better position on the bike and it will help relieve the pressure on my hands. Right now my hands hurting are the only thing that really bothering me. After riding for about 30 mins some of my fingers are tingling/going numb. What are your thoughts on this? Would getting a smaller, less cushy saddle possibly help? If so what are some suggestions? I've included a link to my current saddle for reference.


Current saddle:
Amazon.com : Cloud-9 Saddle C9 GS CRU VAR ES BK-EM 11.25x9 : Bike Saddles And Seats : Sports & Outdoors

The biggest issue in dealing with hand numbness and the easiest to correct is learning how to hold the handlebar correctly. There are subtle differences, but they are exceedingly important. If you wind up putting pressure on the nerves in your hand, you *will* experience numbness. You need to pressure the parts of your hand that are the same ones you use in doing pushups.

Read this article and note the anatomy of the hand. Don't put pressure on the center of the palm, the area between the thumb and index finger or the area between the two pads on the heel of your hand. At first it will feel quite unusual and non-intuitive, but it works. A good thing on mountain bike bars can be to add some of the ergo grips that have a large landing pad for the heel of your hand.

If that doesn't do it, then it's bike fit time. The actual saddle itself is not going to be an issue (although I would think you do need a different saddle - a complete topic on it's own). Saddle placement, stem length and bar height are all big parts of fit that can matter but are a lot harder to deal with than hand position and bar grip (which is a HUGE issue).

J.
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Old 08-26-15, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by scott757 View Post
Getting a new bike isn't really an option at this point.
I understand but don't waste a lot of money at trying to find a solution to your problem. It would be a band-aid at best. Save your money for a properly sized bike...that you buy from a good bike shop that will fit you properly.
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Old 08-26-15, 11:52 AM
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looking from your picture and not knowing you and trying to make your bike work.

You have a little valley between the bar tops and the hoods, you hand fits in there bit it also focuses all that weigh on one part in that valley.
Rotate the bars up so that it's a bit flatter if possible or a smaller dip between then tops and the hoods making this pressure point larger displaced over your hand.

Unwrap your bar tap, try not to rip it so you can re use it. Rotate your handlebars up, move the brake hoods down. the drops won't be as parallel to the ground as they are now, but that's not needed when in the drops anyways. Do not wrap the bar tape yet. Go ride the bike naked and bring tools with you. Make adjustments on the ride and see how it feels. When you get to a nice happy spot, than you can wrap the tape.

Another tip would be to point the tip of the saddle up a tiny amount so you're not sliding weight into the handlebars. Good luck and report back
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Old 08-26-15, 11:52 AM
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At least it's a threadless steerer, so you can swap a few lengths and see what works/doesn't. Do you ride on the hoods? Tops?
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Old 08-26-15, 12:05 PM
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I had some issues with hand numbness and elbow pain when I first got back into riding. For me (your milage may vary) doing some core excersises helped solve my hand and elbow pain. Basically I wasn't supporting myself and was leaning too hard on the bars. Once my core got a bit stronger my hand and elbow pain went away. Just food for thought.

Best of luck!
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Old 08-26-15, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by JReade View Post
At least it's a threadless steerer, so you can swap a few lengths and see what works/doesn't. Do you ride on the hoods? Tops?
All of the above. Since that picture was taken I have brought the handlebars up some.
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