Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
Reload this Page >

Heavy duty triple drive train replacement options for LHT?

Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Heavy duty triple drive train replacement options for LHT?

Old 12-24-15, 01:34 PM
  #1  
whistlerbrk
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Heavy duty triple drive train replacement options for LHT?

I think I'm around 5000 miles into my Long Haul Trucker. Maybe more.

I noticed embarrassingly late that my chainrings are in very bad shape and it's causing some dangerous problems at this point (feels like the chain is skipping when I stand with my weight over the front of the bike, sudden loss of traction/momentum as it skips a tooth).

Surprisingly, my cassette looks to be in fine shape but I am going to replace that as well.

My chain is also getting stretched far too easily. I do tour loaded on this bike, and get that will cause additional wear, but I want a little more life out of these parts in general.

I'm 6'2" / 200lbs.

So one scenario is I'm replacing:

* the chain rings whose gearing is fine for me at 26 / 36 / 48t
* and my cassette which is a Shimano HG-50. I'd like to bump up to a 10 speed since there are no 11-speed triples
* the chain

I'd also like to dump the bar-end shifters which I can't stand and don't think are even that much easier to repair (or whatever reason they are on touring bikes) which will be necessary anyway if I bump up to 10 speed.

Any ideas?

The *other* scenario is if Clydesdales' gives the thumbs up on the durability / rider weight on the 105 11-speed doubles which I think have an excellent price point, I might just upgrade my whole groupo if I can get the gearing right which will still let me haul weight. I like this route as well because I can dump my stock Sora FD which is total trash.

This later scenario I recognize might be a silly idea.
whistlerbrk is offline  
Old 12-24-15, 01:39 PM
  #2  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 15,111

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 107 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3607 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 55 Posts
I'd keep the triple on the LHT but 5k miles seems pretty fast to wear out chainrings. I rode an old crank across the US and the rings were fine when I finished.

If replacing, I'd go with a shimano type trekking crank which is available in the chainring sizes you like (48/36/26). I like the sugino square tape bb triple as well but since you're going with STI, you'll want the shimano trekking triple.

On the rear, 11 speed is a no go in all likelihood since your hubs are probably 8-9-10.
bikemig is offline  
Old 12-24-15, 02:32 PM
  #3  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,928

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 188 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6832 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 210 Times in 175 Posts
Keeping friction bar end shifters for the FD. so adaptable (and you never have the cage drag/scraping the chain
because You can trim the position)

It sacrifices the shifting ramps and pins But Steel chainrings ... like Surly sells in Stainless steel ,

are super long wearing.. though they dont make the 26t granny . but other companies Do.. [TA , France for 1]

next longest wearing is 7075-T6 aluminum, used by the best manufacturers.. They have to be Machined

low cost Sugino chainrings the teeth are Die cut in a stamping press , softer alloy but also less dear to toss and replace..


Gear ratios and their range , matter more than "speeds" .. which is a quantity of cogs stacked up.
but Marketing is obviously Effective.

Last edited by fietsbob; 12-24-15 at 02:39 PM.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 12-24-15, 02:36 PM
  #4  
whistlerbrk
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Hmm interesting. Yes, I actually do like the friction shift for those reasons... thinking thinking...

Last edited by whistlerbrk; 12-24-15 at 02:38 PM. Reason: new reply...
whistlerbrk is offline  
Old 12-24-15, 02:45 PM
  #5  
bikemig 
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 15,111

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 107 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3607 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 55 Posts
If you're comfortable doing your own work, the British online vendors have great prices on shimano gear,

Shimano Deore M590 9 Speed Triple Chainset | Chain Reaction Cycles

The nice thing about the deore is that it has an AL outer and steel rings for the middle and inner; you'll get long life from those. The XT version has I believe all aluminum rings.

There is a thread here where people talked about running STIs with this crank and it works. I'm running 8 speed shimano brifters on a ritchey crank which is essentially a copy of this shimano crank and it works fine.
bikemig is offline  
Old 12-25-15, 08:59 AM
  #6  
indyfabz
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 22,414
Mentioned: 163 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8569 Post(s)
Liked 327 Times in 206 Posts
You own a a cruise ship. Trying to convert it into a performance craft would be, IMO, a waste of money. And do you think converting to 10 or 11 speed is going to lessen the frequency of drivertrain issues?

FWIW, I have had my current LHT since 2011 and have done at least 4,000 of fully-loaded touring on it plus I don;t know how many commuting, etc., miles without replacing the chain rings., and I am 6'2", about 215 lbs. If you are doing loaded touring and carrying a lot of weight, 5,000 out of a chain is pretty good, especially if you mash gears and/or climb a lot of mountains.
indyfabz is offline  
Old 01-11-16, 11:01 AM
  #7  
ypsetihw
Senior Member
 
ypsetihw's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 1,110

Bikes: s-1

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 221 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm 210lbs and ride a 105 5800 compact double 11 spd on my road bike and it works great and I love the way it performs. no issues with my weight in terms of drivetrain performance. but yeah you might need a new rear wheel and BB and will need a new chain and so and and so forth.
ypsetihw is offline  
Old 01-11-16, 11:16 AM
  #8  
Sirrus Rider
Velocommuter Commando
 
Sirrus Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 2,648

Bikes: '88 Specialized Sirrus, '89 Alpine Monitor Pass, two '70 Raligh Twenties, '07 Schwinn Town & Country Trike, '07 Specialized Sirrus Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
I'm watching this thread with rapt facination. I'm the guy who burns up chain within 100 miles from the commuter board.
Sirrus Rider is offline  
Old 01-11-16, 07:58 PM
  #9  
PDKL45
Senior Member
 
PDKL45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: South Korea
Posts: 336

Bikes: Specialized AWOL

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
*Edited for clarity.

I have been doing quite a bit of thinking on this topic recently, due to owning a Specialized AWOL with a 30-39-50 crankset and a 9-speed 11-32 cassette. I am fine for commuting and general riding at the moment, but in the future, if I want to tackle some bigger hills with a heavier load I am going to need a couple of lower gears. Being a Clyde, I prefer strength to lightness in my components.

I think the European Shimano Deore and Deore XT Trekking components (26-36-48 crankset with an 11-36 10-speed cassette) available from online retailers in Europe such as www.bike-discount.de and www.starbike.com are a great idea for heavy duty replacement parts, but there are some issues with using these components as they are designed for flat bar bikes, rather than the dropbars of a LHT.

You can keep your bar end shifters (and maybe change the right hand one for a 10-speed indexed shifter or put the old one in friction mode) and use all Shimano European trekking components, which have a 50mm chainline, different to the 45 mm chainline common on road components, shifted by your bar end shifters.

Other options for shifters are getting a light mounting rail like the Problem Solvers' light mount for your drop bars and mounting MTB trigger shifters on it, using a second stem with cut down MTB flat bars to mount MTB trigger shifters or using Gevenalle Cyclocross shifters (drop bar brake levers with bar-end type shifting levers mounted on them, getting the levers away from your knees).

In this regard be wary of buying a 26-36-48 Deore crankset from Chain Reaction Cycles. They have a well-priced crankset, but they don't seem to sell a compatible front derailleur (see here: 2015-2016 SHIMANO Product Information Web). The German online sellers I mention above have the correct 66-69 degrees derailleur available.

Last edited by PDKL45; 01-12-16 at 10:55 PM.
PDKL45 is offline  
Old 01-11-16, 09:52 PM
  #10  
sstorkel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5,427

Bikes: Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
FWIW, my touring bike uses Ultegra components: 10-speed triple shifters (ST-6603), an Ultegra 10-speed FD (FD-6603), Ultegra 10-speed RD (RD-6600GS), Shimano 9-speed Deore MTB trekking triple crank (FC-M590? 26/36/48), a 10-speed road cassette (11-28), and a 10-speed chain. The only trick to making it work was to remove one of the drive-side spacers from the BB included with the crank. That brings the chainline in to 47.5mm, which is close enough to the 45mm road standard for the Ultegra FD to work. The gearing I've used is about as low as you can go with this setup, and it's not terribly low. It works for me as long as I don't try to carry a lot of gear and do a lot of climbing; one or the other works, but not both. Not having to use bar-end shifters makes it all worthwhile, though! When I'm not actively touring I switch back to the Ultegra triple crank (FC-6603; 52/39/30) and use the bike for commuting or rain rides.
sstorkel is offline  
Old 01-12-16, 02:03 AM
  #11  
PDKL45
Senior Member
 
PDKL45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: South Korea
Posts: 336

Bikes: Specialized AWOL

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
My friend was telling me about the spacer trick just the other day. There are maybe three 2.5 mm spacers on some cranksets? It's a good thing to know and I will look into it more.

Right now, I am planning an upgrade (side grade?) for when my current cassette (11-32 9-speed) wears out. I am going to keep the road triple crankset up front with the Sora 9-speed triple STI shifters and front derailleur, but replace the stock rear Sora derailleur with a long cage 9-speed Deore derailleur. I am going to use one of the new Alivio 12-36 9-speed cassettes and a common HG chain.

I am really happy with the solution, as the new chain is common to all of the Sora, Tiagra, Alivio and Deore groupsets, the derailleur numbers are all within their stated limits and Alivio cassettes are commonly used with Sora components, so all of the components will play together nicely and I gain a much more reasonable low gear to get me up the passes in the Taebaek mountain range.

Edit: There was mention of a 105 Double. As we're talking LHT/tourers, you could check this out:

http://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/c...ducts/roadlink

It offsets the position of your road derailleur on a road compact double drivetrain and allows you to run a 10-speed 11-36 cassette (or a 11-40, with limitations).

Last edited by PDKL45; 01-12-16 at 02:31 AM.
PDKL45 is offline  
Old 01-12-16, 02:16 AM
  #12  
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Posts: 5,447
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 289 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Knowing what brand of crank you have would be useful, If Shimano, the rings have worn very quickly, if FSA, from experience, you have done about right with them for distance.

What ever you have, would be looking at the possibility of just replacing the rings, although this may not be cost effective vs just buying a new crank.
jimc101 is offline  
Old 01-12-16, 02:24 AM
  #13  
PDKL45
Senior Member
 
PDKL45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: South Korea
Posts: 336

Bikes: Specialized AWOL

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
The LHT comes stock with an Andel RSC6, 26/36/48t road crank, a Taiwanese OEM component that looks a bit like a lower-end Sugino crankset, but that's if OP has a stock LHT.
PDKL45 is offline  
Old 01-17-16, 05:53 PM
  #14  
nkfrench 
Senior Member
 
nkfrench's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,841

Bikes: 2006 Specialized Ruby Pro aka "Rhubarb" / and a backup road bike

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If I recall correctly, my bike's chain is usually stretched by the time I wear down a tire.
nkfrench is offline  
Old 01-18-16, 12:24 AM
  #15  
PDKL45
Senior Member
 
PDKL45's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: South Korea
Posts: 336

Bikes: Specialized AWOL

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 104 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 4 Posts
That can depend on the tire, though. When I put them on my bike, I fully expect Schwalbe Marathons (and Marathon Plus/Plus Tour) to last significantly longer than a single chain.
PDKL45 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Gary Fountain
Classic & Vintage
16
07-02-11 09:44 PM
mzeffex
"The 33"-Road Bike Racing
0
01-13-10 08:15 PM
wheel
Commuting
0
09-28-09 08:55 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.