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Tire pressure for 220lbs rider

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Tire pressure for 220lbs rider

Old 02-25-16, 01:40 PM
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Tire pressure for 220lbs rider

Hello,

I weigh 220lbs and I was wondering what tire pressures should I run for the following tires?

Specialized S-Works Turbo (700x26)

Continental 4000S II (700x28)

Thanks and cheers!
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Old 02-25-16, 01:45 PM
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There are quite a few bike tire pressure calculator/charts available.

This one popped to the list.
Bicycle tire pressure calculator

Putting in 240 lbs, 28mm, it came up with 71 psi front, 109 psi rear.

That would get you in the ballpark. I'd probably go up a little from that on the front. 90?
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Old 02-25-16, 01:48 PM
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28c I'd run 95 rear and 5# less in the front. If you pinch flat than bump it up 3psi. You won't know until you flat and how they corner when you lean on them.

S-works turbo is race tire, I'd run a bit harder pressure but read this tire won't last long due to the soft compound and thin ness to make it lighter
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Old 02-25-16, 01:52 PM
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I run my 25mm clinchers at 110 in the rear and about 95-100 in front. (also 220) No pinch flats.

My 28mm tubeless I run at 90 R/ 80F and I could probably go lower.
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Old 02-25-16, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse
My 28mm tubeless I run at 90 R/ 80F and I could probably go lower.

Yes you could. That's tubed pressures, MAN
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Old 02-26-16, 09:49 AM
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I'm 224 w/ clothes and shoes and rack/trunk has at least 10lbs in it. I always crank my 700x23s to the max 120psi. a tiny bit bleeds out when I take the chuck off so maybe they're at 115? 110?
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Old 02-29-16, 11:23 PM
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I run about 100 psi on my 28 mm tires. I weigh 220 as well.
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Old 03-01-16, 01:50 PM
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Well I suppose I'll ask. Why not just max the PSI? I'm asking, not saying "Duh, do this!" I usually max mine out. Am I doing something that is contrary to what is usually done?
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Old 03-01-16, 02:10 PM
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I'm in the 220 to 230 Lb weight range. I'm using 100 front and 115 rear on lightweight high performance tires in the 27 to 29mm width range.

Lightweight high performance tires with a high tpi count of 120 or more need a higher psi than a stiffer tire with a lower tpi and extra flat resistant material.
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Old 03-01-16, 06:48 PM
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Best (correct) tire pressure is not a guess. Michelin, Schwalbe & Continental, et all, have engineering data and a hellevalotta of testing experience behind their tire pressure recommendations. They all say that the correct pressure is directly related to "tire drop", a measure of how much a tire 'flattens' under load.

The industry standard, agreed upon by the people who design, test & manufacture bicycle tires, is that a tire is correctly inflated, under load, when it becomes compressed by 20% (15% measured from the rim to the ground). Of course this is a starting point and not a rigid rule; however, they know what they are doing while most of us are merely guessing.

A majority of road, MTB and touring bikes have a weight distribution of about 40% front and 60% rear, plus or minus 5% or so. This means that front/rear tire pressures need to have a similar pressure ratio. The same pressure, fore and aft, is always wrong; one or the other is either under inflated or over inflated, perhaps both ;o)

I offer the following links to bolster my argument:

Bicycle tire pressure calculator
https://www.bikequarterly.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
https://bccclub.org/documents/Tireinflation.pdf

My Cannodale Synapse is fitted with Conti "Gatorskin" tires, 28 front & 32 rear. The various calculators suggested 75psi front and 90 rear; I use those pressures and performance is excellent. If both tires were 28s, the pressure distribution would be 75/112 or so.

I strongly recommend that Y'all look at those links listed above and consider that they are not guesses but formulae based upon extensive testing and engineering prowess. Witness how the TDF 'experts' have caved to engineering data these past several years; they now use larger tires and less pressure. The bikes are faster and safer than they were with really skinny tires that were over-pressurized.

End Of Rant LOL ;o)

Joe

Last edited by Joe Minton; 03-01-16 at 07:11 PM.
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Old 03-02-16, 10:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Joe Minton
Best (correct) tire pressure is not a guess. Michelin, Schwalbe & Continental, et all, have engineering data and a hellevalotta of testing experience behind their tire pressure recommendations. They all say that the correct pressure is directly related to "tire drop", a measure of how much a tire 'flattens' under load.

The industry standard, agreed upon by the people who design, test & manufacture bicycle tires, is that a tire is correctly inflated, under load, when it becomes compressed by 20% (15% measured from the rim to the ground). Of course this is a starting point and not a rigid rule; however, they know what they are doing while most of us are merely guessing.

A majority of road, MTB and touring bikes have a weight distribution of about 40% front and 60% rear, plus or minus 5% or so. This means that front/rear tire pressures need to have a similar pressure ratio. The same pressure, fore and aft, is always wrong; one or the other is either under inflated or over inflated, perhaps both ;o)

I offer the following links to bolster my argument:

Bicycle tire pressure calculator
https://www.bikequarterly.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
https://bccclub.org/documents/Tireinflation.pdf

My Cannodale Synapse is fitted with Conti "Gatorskin" tires, 28 front & 32 rear. The various calculators suggested 75psi front and 90 rear; I use those pressures and performance is excellent. If both tires were 28s, the pressure distribution would be 75/112 or so.

I strongly recommend that Y'all look at those links listed above and consider that they are not guesses but formulae based upon extensive testing and engineering prowess. Witness how the TDF 'experts' have caved to engineering data these past several years; they now use larger tires and less pressure. The bikes are faster and safer than they were with really skinny tires that were over-pressurized.

End Of Rant LOL ;o)

Joe
Agree that you should try to set the tire pressure to the optimum tire pressure by some of the calculators. Although I have heard that slightly less pressure may be better of slick conditions.

But a lot of us Clyde may have to use the Max pressure to get close to the ideal pressure. I know that I do for my rear tire.

GH
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Old 03-02-16, 11:02 AM
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I would suggest trying all different pressures within the constraints of the rec. min and max. I usually keep my front closer to the minimum recommended pressure maybe 5-10 PSI over. If you are going to use wider tires, may as well take advantage of being able to run lower pressure!
Check out this link from Bicycling.
4 Ways Your Tire Pressure Is Wrong | Bicycling
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Old 03-02-16, 12:32 PM
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ColaJacket:

If the max recommended tire pressure is too low to fit the calculators, it is likely that you need to fit larger tires, and --- you may not be able to do that.

The problem for folks like us (I'm 6'1", 230#) is that road bikes and even mountain bikes are designed and tuned to carry much lighter people. Many if not most road bikes simply cannot accommodate us larger riders. It is very difficult to find a 'road bike' that was designed for us Clydesdales.

Many, perhaps most, mountain bikes can be fitted with larger tires, tires that conform to the standards encouraged by bicycle tire engineers.

My 'everyday' bike is a full suspension Gary Fisher "HiFi Deluxe" from 2008. I have modified it to become my "everyday/all-round" bike/transportation device" I have fitted Schwalbe Kojak tires (50X559/2.0"x26") and they are simply wonderful for what I do and what I require of a street tire. I have tuned the suspension for how and where I ride.

You might consider going to a mountain bike: They more easily accommodate our size/bulk, ride easier/softer and are simply a lot of fun to ride around.

Joe
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Old 03-03-16, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Joe Minton
ColaJacket:

If the max recommended tire pressure is too low to fit the calculators, it is likely that you need to fit larger tires, and --- you may not be able to do that.

The problem for folks like us (I'm 6'1", 230#) is that road bikes and even mountain bikes are designed and tuned to carry much lighter people. Many if not most road bikes simply cannot accommodate us larger riders. It is very difficult to find a 'road bike' that was designed for us Clydesdales.

Many, perhaps most, mountain bikes can be fitted with larger tires, tires that conform to the standards encouraged by bicycle tire engineers.

My 'everyday' bike is a full suspension Gary Fisher "HiFi Deluxe" from 2008. I have modified it to become my "everyday/all-round" bike/transportation device" I have fitted Schwalbe Kojak tires (50X559/2.0"x26") and they are simply wonderful for what I do and what I require of a street tire. I have tuned the suspension for how and where I ride.

You might consider going to a mountain bike: They more easily accommodate our size/bulk, ride easier/softer and are simply a lot of fun to ride around.

Joe
The calculator recommends 125, and the max psi is 100. So I normally inflate to about 105/110. I'm running 700c x 28mm. The rear might be able to handle 700c x 30mm. When I need to get new tires, I'll probably still get 28's, but I'll see if I can get some that handle a slightly higher pressure.

I have a Fuji Sportif.

GH
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