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Thinking about new bike, possibly salsa fargo.

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Thinking about new bike, possibly salsa fargo.

Old 03-11-16, 12:29 PM
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Thinking about new bike, possibly salsa fargo.

Hey folks, I want to get suggestions on bike options. To start I'm about 6'4" and 300lbs and I picked up a Felt V85 gravel bike almost a year ago and haven't been completely satisfied with it. Its fine for my commutes and weekend road rides on level ground. Trouble is the gearing isn't nearly low enough for some of the near by foot hills, at least not for me. 34x32 is as low as it goes, and I find myself avoiding the hills and trail rides I had envisioned. Plus, I like being more upright, so I'm looking at the fargo or the like as something to replace it with. Wondering what other tips or bikes you might suggest. 90% of my riding is in pavement and mostly commuting, but the Sierras are virtually in my back yard and it would be fun to do some off road trails.

Last edited by jbandt; 03-11-16 at 12:31 PM. Reason: Typo
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Old 03-11-16, 01:20 PM
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You can check out the Surly Long Haul Trucker (Long Haul Trucker | Bikes | Surly Bikes). Nice upright position and a steel frame that can handle some poundage. You can alos fit up to a 2.1" tire. I was looking to buy this bike a few months back but I figured my wife would kill me if I bought another bike!

Can't go wrong with Salsa, they makes nice stuff to![h=1]Long Haul Trucker[/h]
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Old 03-11-16, 01:22 PM
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The ECR might be geared better for climbing...

ECR | Bikes | Surly Bikes
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Old 03-11-16, 03:01 PM
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I think the fargo would be a good fit. AKA monster cross bike. and comes with a nice Carbon front fork to help with chattering and high speed frequency bumps over time
FARGO X9 | Bikes | Salsa Cycles

Allows you to use a MTB crankset + rear gearing 11-36 cassette and the 29er wheels can run knobbies or 32c street tires on the same rims. (check rim spec before mounting high PSI 25c tires, some rim locks don't hold the bead at high psi)
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Old 03-11-16, 03:07 PM
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Well I'm not a fan of that handlebar on the ECR, but it's worth checking out. Gearing actually seems too low for the flat, but it probably works well given the weight and tire size.

I do have a question about steel though. How compliant is it? I like the fargo because it has carbon fork option and I really like that feature as it's on my current bike and it really smooths out the road. But I've never really been on a steel bike before.
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Old 03-11-16, 03:28 PM
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For ME and offroading...steel forks was good up to about 90min rides. I've tried straight leg and curved leg from Voodoo, straight leg from Soul Cycle. Some of the washboard bumps at high speed would shake me so bad, through the frame down to the pedals. Flat out would beat me up after 2hrs and was training for a 12hr event at the time. I switched to a Niner 29er carbon fork (straight steer tube) it was like heaven on a bike. I PR'd down hill segments the first time out with it and thru nasty stuff that should have a suspension. The vibrations and ruts hits was mutted up front and never traveled past the head tube. The long term rides of using the carbon fork allowed me to focus on other parts of riding vs how is that bump going to beat me up. I did 7hrs of the 12hr endurance on the singlespeed & carbon fork. Legs gave out before my back and upper body did.

Steel frames are nice, rides a bit like carbon muting vibrations, but just not as light and snappy as carbon. That said, I own 5 bikes, 2 carbons, 2 alum, 1 steel
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Old 03-11-16, 03:43 PM
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I had a hunch the carbon fork was the way to go. My weekend rides can range from 2-4 hrs so comfort is pretty important. I know the fargo has a front suspension option, but with most of my time on the road I don't think I'd get mugh benefit there. I don't care for the weight penalty of steel but I'm starting to think it's worth checking out. Its not like I'm that fast anyway. I just know I want mtb gearing, a mostly comfy ride, and I'd like to have drop bars.
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Old 03-11-16, 04:38 PM
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This is certainly the first time I've heard the idea that a carbon fork absorbs more road buzz than a steel fork! Generally I would say that CF forks are mainly about reducing buzz while having a lightweight fork. My experience is a steel fork still provides a more cushy ride, but you pay a weight penalty. BTW out of the three bikes in my current Arsenal, 2 have CF forks and one steel.
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Old 03-11-16, 05:06 PM
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Can't you switch out to a mountain cassette and derailleur on your Felt? I know there are some compatibility issues doing this with 11 speed, but there has to be a way to do this that would be cheaper than purchasing an entirely new bike.
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Old 03-11-16, 05:30 PM
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I suppose I could switch out parts, but don't know what that would entail. Since I want lower gearing I'd have to switch the cassette, fr and rr derailleurs, new brifters that would be compatible, new chain rings and probably cranks. Based on my limited understanding of shimano components, I'd have to get a whole new moutain drive train since road and moutain parts are not interchangeable. Then to have lbs do all the work, it's hard to say what the total cost savings would really be. Then again, maybe all that work isn't needed.
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Old 03-11-16, 06:09 PM
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Sram road and MT are interchangeable given same speed count. Lots of the Pro tour guys mix and match setups for steep mt climbs of the Giro for their 2nd bike.

Plus the added Torque that the 36t cassette makes can shred the guts of a weak hub.

Sram Grouppo pls labor is half the Fargo...N+1 rules in full effect

One for roadie, one for dirt adventure bike w/ better gearing
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Old 03-12-16, 12:33 AM
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Originally Posted by jbandt
Hey folks, I want to get suggestions on bike options. To start I'm about 6'4" and 300lbs and I picked up a Felt V85 gravel bike almost a year ago and haven't been completely satisfied with it. Its fine for my commutes and weekend road rides on level ground. Trouble is the gearing isn't nearly low enough for some of the near by foot hills, at least not for me. 34x32 is as low as it goes, and I find myself avoiding the hills and trail rides I had envisioned. Plus, I like being more upright, so I'm looking at the fargo or the like as something to replace it with. Wondering what other tips or bikes you might suggest. 90% of my riding is in pavement and mostly commuting, but the Sierras are virtually in my back yard and it would be fun to do some off road trails.
OK, and I say this delicately... gearing is not your problem for riding in the Sierras.
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Old 03-12-16, 12:54 AM
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Agreed. But gearing does present a solution which is why I'm looking for bikes with lower gearing.
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Old 03-13-16, 09:05 AM
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Look at a mountain crank and see if it would work on your bike.
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Old 03-13-16, 09:15 AM
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Could you have different bikes? One for road/town smooth surface riding and one for mountain stuff? You know? N + 1 ?
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Old 03-14-16, 09:06 AM
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Multiple bikes really isn't an option. I enjoy cycling but more as a source of exercise than for the sport itself. Plus, I don't like having invested into stuff where I'm not getting enough use out of it, and to have multiple would mean one would be mostly sitting around. I did think about buying a low end mountain bike for trail use, but I know how I am and I would barely touch it.
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Old 03-16-16, 03:26 AM
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Instead of a new bike, maybe Google "Wolftooth Tanpan," a device that will allow you to keep your STI shifters and run an MTB rear derailleur and cassette.

SKS cycles in the UK also sells the shiftmate online, virtually the same thing. The amount of cable your levers pull is less than the MTB rear derailleurs need.

Those devices change the pull ratio so you can use MTB components out back to give you a wider range and are a viable alternative to the hassle of a whole new bike.

Edit: Some links.

Tanpan
https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/p...py-of-roadlink

Shiftmate
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/jtek-shif...19044/?geoc=kr

Bonus:
https://www.cyclingabout.com/wider-ge...hill-climbing/

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Old 03-17-16, 11:08 PM
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As a Clyde and as a Fargo owner, I will highly advocate the Fargo. I have the steel fork and love it. I can use it to mountain bike, tour, commute, or throw on skinny tires and do about as well as my road bike, all while being waaaaaay more comfy. Feel free to PM me of you have questions. I think everyone should have a Fargo.
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Old 03-18-16, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by PDKL45
Instead of a new bike, maybe Google "Wolftooth Tanpan," a device that will allow you to keep your STI shifters and run an MTB rear derailleur and cassette.

SKS cycles in the UK also sells the shiftmate online, virtually the same thing. The amount of cable your levers pull is less than the MTB rear derailleurs need.

Those devices change the pull ratio so you can use MTB components out back to give you a wider range and are a viable alternative to the hassle of a whole new bike.

Edit: Some links.

Tanpan
Tanpan ? wolftoothcomponents.com

Shiftmate
Jtek Shift Mate Straight 6 shifting adaptor - 29.99

Bonus:
Low Gear Range: Road Shifters & Gears For Easier Hill Climbing - CyclingAbout CyclingAbout
BTW I don't know much about the OP's bike, but if it's 10 speed, then you can buy a 9-speed Mountain Bike Derailleur ($32 Deore is good, $55 XT is better, yes a 9-speed derailleur will work with a 10 speed road shifter and you'll get 10 gears), and it will allow you to run 10 speed wider range cassettes. If you're 11 speed, then another option is the Wolftooth RoadLink, which allows your current derailleur to use a cassette with a larger big cog:

RoadLink ? wolftoothcomponents.com

You need to pay attention to derailleur capacity though.
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