Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

orthotics

Old 04-24-16, 12:06 PM
  #26  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
orthotics

Update: after repositioning of cleat all the way to outside of sole...I'm 23.34 miles into ride and virtually no pain and numbness.

I'm going to look into the suggestion of a running shoe store. And get in to podiatrist.
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 02:00 PM
  #27  
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 3,999

Bikes: N+1=5

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
Update: after repositioning of cleat all the way to outside of sole...I'm 23.34 miles into ride and virtually no pain and numbness.

I'm going to look into the suggestion of a running shoe store. And get in to podiatrist.
Just to make sure - did you mean that you have narrowed your stance or widened your stance on the pedals?
JohnJ80 is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:21 PM
  #28  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
Update: after repositioning of cleat all the way to outside of sole...I'm 23.34 miles into ride and virtually no pain and numbness.

I'm going to look into the suggestion of a running shoe store. And get in to podiatrist.
Just to make sure - did you mean that you have narrowed your stance or widened your stance on the pedals?
Thinking narrowed. The inside of my shoe is now closer to cranks.
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:40 PM
  #29  
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 3,999

Bikes: N+1=5

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
Thinking narrowed. The inside of my shoe is now closer to cranks.
Hmm. Most often for Clydes it's the other way around where a wider stance is more comfortable. Has me wondering if you need wedges etc.. and if it's more of a pronation issue.

Might want to give some serious consideration to a pedal fit at an LBS that is trained in it. Could save you a lot of time and future problems. For example, when I was fooling with this stuff, I started playing with my Q factor (essentially distance between feet) to solve a foot problem simlar to what you are doing. Fixed that but in the process caused a hip problem. Getting this right is a matter of millimeters.

Speedplay has a kit that is really helpful for that, it's a kit of pedals that are 1/8" shorter, nominal, 1/8" longer, 1/4" and 1/2" longer spindles. Speedplay road cleats are adjustable enough that they can bridge much of the difference between spindle lengths. If you have someone watching your leg biomechanics while you pedal your bike on a trainer, you could probably nail this problem quickly.

As for insoles, do a good set regardless of the pedal issue. The ones that come in most shoes are just about worthless (or worse). Your feet will thank you for the proper support.
JohnJ80 is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:47 PM
  #30  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
orthotics

I'm an Athena not a Clyde.

That said I was previously told my fitter to move my feet closer to crank but when I got my new shoes I did it backwards and just now figured that out
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 07:48 PM
  #31  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
orthotics

I have hip issues from birth that mess with my biomechanics and I've had fittings done
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 04-24-16, 08:03 PM
  #32  
v402872
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Tampa, Land O Lakes
Posts: 40

Bikes: 2016 Escape 1, Scott CR1 20

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I agree with the Superfeet concept. Plantar Faciitis is a bear,m those are the best Orthodics
v402872 is offline  
Old 04-25-16, 09:14 AM
  #33  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
orthotics

I'm going to check out the various options for inserts and see how that goes. My 46+ mile ride was more comfortable but not 100%.
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 04-25-16, 10:19 AM
  #34  
Secret Squirrel
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Southern Calif
Posts: 554
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 77 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 4 Posts
I think you are on the right track with adjustments to your cleat position. I had similar issues over the years. Side to side adjustments and cleat wedges addressed my inside knee pain. Fore/aft cleat adjustments corrected my metatarsal arch issues and toe numbness. I ended up adding a Speedplay extension plate to get more adjustment than the shoe would allow. I moved the cleat back from the metatarsal arch and took the pressure off of my fore foot. A DIY arch support also moved the pressure from my metatarsal arch and gave me stability from the arch to the heel. As you get older, you lose the padding on the pads of your feet and the things like Morton's neuroma came flare up.
Any adjustments to your cleat position should be methodically implimented over a extended period. You can make short cuts to this process by throwing money at the problem with the aid of a good cleat fitting.
This article helped my toe numbness:

https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com...leat-position/
Secret Squirrel is offline  
Old 05-08-16, 08:49 PM
  #35  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
I have some SuperFeet Carbon on the way.
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 05-23-16, 12:56 AM
  #36  
JakiChan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 809

Bikes: Specialized Sirrus Comp

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My podiatrist looked at my bike shoes (S-Works road, natch) and didn't think I needed my orthotics in them, FWIW. I've also had a BG Pro fit done by an epic fitter who correctly diagnosed a leg-length discrepancy. (In fact she started a betting pool at the sho which she lost. "1.5cm? No way. I need to see the radiologist report....wow, really....") She has me pretty well dialed in with cleat placement. As much as she can, anyway. I'm a "challenge".
JakiChan is offline  
Old 05-30-16, 05:59 AM
  #37  
v402872
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Tampa, Land O Lakes
Posts: 40

Bikes: 2016 Escape 1, Scott CR1 20

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Superfeet, best stuff out there
v402872 is offline  
Old 05-30-16, 10:08 AM
  #38  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Superfeet did not help. Dr appt Wednesday and will be asking for referral to podiatrist. Was looking at my insoles that came with my Shimano R321-W (bought wide for my foot issues). Heat molded with tune able arch support (three options). In looking at the stuff I noticed there were two little half moon shaped pads and realized they are a metatarsal button and there is outline on insole bottom to stick them. I put them on the insoles.

Did 46 miles yesterday. Not a fix but not worse.

My next step along with podiatrist is a fitter who can look at issues like leg length and whether I need shims and such to adjust cleat.

My friend (who hates Speedplay) is blaming the pedals (I use Speedplay Zero's)
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 05-30-16, 11:26 AM
  #39  
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 3,999

Bikes: N+1=5

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by v402872 View Post
Superfeet, best stuff out there
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
Superfeet did not help. Dr appt Wednesday and will be asking for referral to podiatrist. Was looking at my insoles that came with my Shimano R321-W (bought wide for my foot issues). Heat molded with tune able arch support (three options). In looking at the stuff I noticed there were two little half moon shaped pads and realized they are a metatarsal button and there is outline on insole bottom to stick them. I put them on the insoles.

Did 46 miles yesterday. Not a fix but not worse.

My next step along with podiatrist is a fitter who can look at issues like leg length and whether I need shims and such to adjust cleat.

My friend (who hates Speedplay) is blaming the pedals (I use Speedplay Zero's)
Superfeet and not all that great of an orthotic. Typically, they provide only moderate support to the main arch of your foot. If you have, or are supposed to have, high arches, they won't work well for you. They also provide no metatarsal support.

Having not enough arch support is pretty much the same as having none. If your arch still has to collapse to hit the orthotic, then it didn't help. You'll probably need orthotics that will feel to you as if the arch is too high. You're now used to having nothing touching your arch in your shoes but it neds to be up to fill that empty spece. Buy the Sole insoles and get a heat gun and then with your fingers (wear gloves) progressively heat and shape the insole under the arch and forward to the metatarsals to get a higher arch and solid metatarsal support. It's not hard and takes about 10 minutes of work. You'll get perfect insoles. If your podiatrist gives you insoles you can model the Sole's after those so that you get the same shape. The prescription insoles are going to be doubtful for a cycling shoe fit (like about a certainty they will be too thick).

If you really want insoles that would be perfect and fit in a tight fit situation like a cycliing shoe, go to a ski shop with your prescription insoles and have them make custom insoles for you. They'll use the prescription ones as a guide. They are used to making thin insoles that fit into tight places - a racing ski boot fit is much more precise than a cycling shoe with less room.

It's not the pedals but the pedals can be part of the solution. For a clyde, I'd almost certainly recommend moving your feet out as far as they go (i.e. cleat in to the instep as far as it will go). Usually (like almost always) clydes need a wider Q-factor. Speedplay has the largest platform out there between the cleat and the pedal which is good for supporting your feet/arches. I can conjecture that moving your pedals out may have been tougher on your if your arches are unsupported and sore. You may find pedaling on the largely/overly outside of your foot to be more comfortable (although wrong) because your arch is sore. If your arches were not supported and you put your pedals in the proper position for you (more even across the bottom of your foot), your arches would suffer. Support the arches then open the Q factor (wider) and see what happens.

If that doesn't work, then get the wedges from BikeFit and try those. Put them between the cleat and the sole of the shoe. Speedplay supports this nicely and it's easier to maintain the cleat position than any other pedal system (use a silver magic marker to note screw position). Also move the cleat as far back as you can - which is considerable with Speedplay.

The next step - and probably the most important - is pedalling technique. Raise your cadence and lighten the pressure on each pedal stroke. I learned this a number of years ago and it had a profound impact on foot comfort. Think about it for a minute - if you are putting serious pressure on each pedal stroke especially with insufficient arch support, you're going to really be putting the wood to those arches. Reduce the pressure and keep the power the same by more RPMs with less power per revolution. Try and work up to a cadence of 85-90rpm keeping to your same average speed or speed on sections where you know what your speed is. I think you'll find a dramatic improvement in foot comfort especially if you are riding with a cadence in the 60's to 70's.

Either way, the right first step is going to get good supportive arches. I highly doubt superfeet would do the job for you from what you've described.


J.
JohnJ80 is offline  
Old 05-31-16, 08:54 AM
  #40  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by johnj80 View Post
superfeet and not all that great of an orthotic. Typically, they provide only moderate support to the main arch of your foot. If you have, or are supposed to have, high arches, they won't work well for you. They also provide no metatarsal support.
I put arch supports in with the custom soles that came with shoes. I may try the medium arch that was included.

Originally Posted by johnj80 View Post
having not enough arch support is pretty much the same as having none. If your arch still has to collapse to hit the orthotic, then it didn't help. You'll probably need orthotics that will feel to you as if the arch is too high. You're now used to having nothing touching your arch in your shoes but it neds to be up to fill that empty spece. Buy the sole insoles and get a heat gun and then with your fingers (wear gloves) progressively heat and shape the insole under the arch and forward to the metatarsals to get a higher arch and solid metatarsal support. It's not hard and takes about 10 minutes of work. You'll get perfect insoles. If your podiatrist gives you insoles you can model the sole's after those so that you get the same shape. The prescription insoles are going to be doubtful for a cycling shoe fit (like about a certainty they will be too thick).
Sounds complicated

Originally Posted by johnj80 View Post
if you really want insoles that would be perfect and fit in a tight fit situation like a cycliing shoe, go to a ski shop with your prescription insoles and have them make custom insoles for you. They'll use the prescription ones as a guide. They are used to making thin insoles that fit into tight places - a racing ski boot fit is much more precise than a cycling shoe with less room.
Good idea

Originally Posted by johnj80 View Post
it's not the pedals but the pedals can be part of the solution. For a clyde, i'd almost certainly recommend moving your feet out as far as they go (i.e. Cleat in to the instep as far as it will go). Usually (like almost always) clydes need a wider q-factor. Speedplay has the largest platform out there between the cleat and the pedal which is good for supporting your feet/arches. I can conjecture that moving your pedals out may have been tougher on your if your arches are unsupported and sore. You may find pedaling on the largely/overly outside of your foot to be more comfortable (although wrong) because your arch is sore. If your arches were not supported and you put your pedals in the proper position for you (more even across the bottom of your foot), your arches would suffer. Support the arches then open the q factor (wider) and see what happens.
I'm not a Clyde. I had them all the way in and that was not good. I moved them out and felt better. Work in progress

Originally Posted by johnj80 View Post
if that doesn't work, then get the wedges from bikefit and try those. Put them between the cleat and the sole of the shoe. Speedplay supports this nicely and it's easier to maintain the cleat position than any other pedal system (use a silver magic marker to note screw position). Also move the cleat as far back as you can - which is considerable with speedplay
Already there

Originally Posted by johnj80 View Post
the next step - and probably the most important - is pedalling technique. Raise your cadence and lighten the pressure on each pedal stroke. I learned this a number of years ago and it had a profound impact on foot comfort. Think about it for a minute - if you are putting serious pressure on each pedal stroke especially with insufficient arch support, you're going to really be putting the wood to those arches. Reduce the pressure and keep the power the same by more rpms with less power per revolution. Try and work up to a cadence of 85-90rpm keeping to your same average speed or speed on sections where you know what your speed is. I think you'll find a dramatic improvement in foot comfort especially if you are riding with a cadence in the 60's to 70's.
Why assume I mash? I pedal at 80-90 cadence unless climbing

Originally Posted by johnj80 View Post
either way, the right first step is going to get good supportive arches. I highly doubt superfeet would do the job for you from what you've described.
Already learned they did not help. Hence going back to the custom insoles that came with the shoes. I may look into finding a shop that does the heat molding better than shop I got shoes from. I don't think they got shoes hot enough.

j.[/quote]
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 05-31-16, 09:16 AM
  #41  
JohnJ80
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 3,999

Bikes: N+1=5

Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 537 Post(s)
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
I put arch supports in with the custom soles that came with shoes. I may try the medium arch that was included.
Good idea. Experimentation is really key in this. There is no magic in even prescription orthotics. For example, I had some made and they did nothing. This is really one of those "listen to your body" things and you need to understand your feet and then figure out what to do about it. A podiatrist can help and I think they get what is going on, but it's the orthotic process that I think is flawed. When they have you stand on something to make an impression, then you're just as likely to be collapsing the arches than making a good impression. I think the right process is a vacuum bagging process with no weight on the foot. That used to be how some systems worked and I found them to give better results.



Sounds complicated
With regards to shaping the Sole insoles yourself - it's not and sounds a lot worse than it is. It's really about 10 minutes with a heat gun and you can shape them to give you the shape and support you want.



I'm not a Clyde. I had them all the way in and that was not good. I moved them out and felt better. Work in progress
I was presuming you were since this is a Clyde forum. Many Clydes can benefit from adjusting their Q-factor wider. Good to know that part is figured out.

Why assume I mash? I pedal at 80-90 cadence unless climbing
Excellent to know this can be ruled out too. The reason I assumed that was that most people are and it's a clear tendency for Clydes (Clyde forum thing again...). This works for a lot of people to get their cadence up and the foot pressure down but it means concentrating on technique.

Already learned they did not help. Hence going back to the custom insoles that came with the shoes. I may look into finding a shop that does the heat molding better than shop I got shoes from. I don't think they got shoes hot enough.
In general, I find the heat molding process that most shoes and insoles suggest to be seriously flawed (see above). All you wind up doing is molding the shoes/insole into the shape you don't want them in. It's almost like you force them into the exact wrong shape - at least when you are talking arch support.

It's really easy to do insoles yourself with a heat gun. It's not like they get all floppy and lose their shape, you're just softening part of it and then pushing it into the shape with your fingers. I just put on a pair of leather gloves since the insole gets warm (~200F) and then push with my fingers. I find that all I need to do with most is to make sure the main arch is high enough and then extend it out along the center of the insole towards the metatarsals. It's like pushing in the shape you would have if you put in one of those Dr. Scholl's metasaral pads. It's not hard.

Looking at this, I'd say you are making a lot of progress in your experimentation. Just keep at it and you'll get it dialed.

J.
JohnJ80 is offline  
Old 05-31-16, 02:19 PM
  #42  
arex
Abuse Magnet
 
arex's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,649

Bikes: '91 Mtn Tek Vertical, '74 Raleigh Sports, '72 Raleigh Twenty, '84 Univega Gran Turismo, '09 Surly Karate Monkey

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
I use green Superfeet in all my walking shoes, but not any shoes I ride with (not actual bike shoes). I haven't noticed a problem being without them while riding.
arex is offline  
Old 05-31-16, 08:16 PM
  #43  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
orthotics

@JohnJ80

Thx for all the info!

I'm in this forum because I'm an Athena. But I get the assumption LOL
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 06-01-16, 11:37 AM
  #44  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
orthotics

Saw Doc. Referral to podiatrist in works. May look at ways to massage feet to alleviate nerve pressure.
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 07-24-16, 06:30 PM
  #45  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Had a dental issue come up preventing me from going to podiatrist. I got to thinking about my shoes. I have several pair now. My Fizik Carbon sole shoes I got in 2013 never bothered me while riding only when walking. So with being unable to get in to foot doc...I decided give those a shot and see. Turns out I'm not having the pain I was having. Still experimenting with climbing + distance to see if I'm back to my old self. Maybe my LG and Shimano shoes are just crap fitting on my feet.
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 07-25-16, 11:30 AM
  #46  
Yendor72
Senior Member
 
Yendor72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Minnesnowta
Posts: 881

Bikes: 2013 Masi Premiare PC3, 2016 Framed Wolftrax, 2016 Trek Emonda SL

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
Had a dental issue come up preventing me from going to podiatrist. I got to thinking about my shoes. I have several pair now. My Fizik Carbon sole shoes I got in 2013 never bothered me while riding only when walking. So with being unable to get in to foot doc...I decided give those a shot and see. Turns out I'm not having the pain I was having. Still experimenting with climbing + distance to see if I'm back to my old self. Maybe my LG and Shimano shoes are just crap fitting on my feet.
What is the difference in fit between the shoes? I hope you have it figured out.
Yendor72 is offline  
Old 07-25-16, 03:29 PM
  #47  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Yendor72 View Post
What is the difference in fit between the shoes? I hope you have it figured out.
I'm not sure what specifically is different. Wish I knew too as I'd like to not waste $ in future on shoes
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Old 07-26-16, 10:04 AM
  #48  
Yendor72
Senior Member
 
Yendor72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Minnesnowta
Posts: 881

Bikes: 2013 Masi Premiare PC3, 2016 Framed Wolftrax, 2016 Trek Emonda SL

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 5 Posts
Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
I'm not sure what specifically is different. Wish I knew too as I'd like to not waste $ in future on shoes
One thing that I noticed between shoes is that some manufactures make a lip on the edge of the sole that points up, this presses the foot inward causing me pain. My new Lake shoes are flat, my feet can spill over the side if they need to. Both pairs are carbon fiber soled so they are both very stiff. That is comparing my Serfas to my Lake's, I am glad I found a shoe that works for me. It's little things like that which can cause discomfort and be hard to troubleshoot.
Yendor72 is offline  
Old 08-08-16, 10:15 PM
  #49  
Beachgrad05
Just Keep Pedaling
Thread Starter
 
Beachgrad05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Lakewood, CA
Posts: 3,240

Bikes: 99 Schwinn Mesa GS MTB, 15 Trek Domane 5.9 Dura-Ace, 17 Trek Emonda SL6 Pro & 18 Bianchi Vigorelli

Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 216 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
I really have no idea what is issue with the Shimano and LG shoes.

The Fizik shoes are such a relief. I have been wearing them every ride lately. Last week was 64 miles and 3200 feet of climbing with ZERO issues that were making it so difficult to pedal and put pressure on forefoot when climbing.

Guess I will be a Fizik customer for next pair
Beachgrad05 is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Richk
Mountains-Plains Regional Rides and Events
0
01-11-14 09:02 AM
obie
Foo
0
01-09-09 07:51 AM
oldacura
Recumbent
4
09-10-07 02:12 PM
Timo
Road Cycling
0
05-14-05 02:14 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.