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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Help a newbie

Old 06-22-16, 08:18 PM
  #26  
jethro56 
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I'd rather have cheap rim brakes than cheap disc brakes.
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Old 06-22-16, 08:38 PM
  #27  
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Hope this helps

Hello, I cant offer any help about the bikes as im a newbie myself. My response is about your bike shop. I would find another one and here's why. I just bought my first bike yesterday. I went to my local shop, told the girl I was fat and needed a strong bike lol. Told her my price range and also told her I had a bike in mind, she pulled it out aired up the tires, fitted it and told me to take it for a ride. When I got back she had 5 other bikes pulled out all with similar features in the same price range. She told me to ride all of them then we will make a decision. I was shocked at the time they invested in me. She didnt sell me on anything I wasnt looking for. When it was said and done she told me the bike I picked was a 2015 so it was 20% off!! All she suggested for an upgrade was a thicker tube and metal pedals. Pro shops should take the time to do it right with you. Good luck with everything.

(Ps. I left out my bike choice to not confuse you further lol.)
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Old 06-23-16, 03:14 AM
  #28  
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One GOOD thing about disk brakes is they push spoke counts up....in rim brake bikes lower spoke count wheels trickle down and are percieved as a "value"....my Fuji 1.5 has Sora mechanical disks which worked fine for me, and they usually bring 32 spoke front and rear wheels with them :-). The down side might be fewer off the shelf pre built wheels in disk Brake (but that will change over time) but being more on the stout side your not going to be happy with those anyway :-).
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Old 06-23-16, 07:50 AM
  #29  
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In defense of the local bike shop. I went in with the question, "What are my options as a 320 lb guy?" The sales guy showed me stuff to answer that question. I think I was so intimidated that i was not initially clear about what I wanted to do, which is ride for fitness, I'm just unsure what that initially looks like for a couch potato.

I am going back in to the shop this afternoon, their site says the fx 7.2 is now on sale for 449.99 so I was gonna ask about that. I have about $600 tops i can spend right now. That will have to include a helmet and whatever accessories are necessary.
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Old 06-23-16, 08:29 AM
  #30  
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Ok well in the necessary list is a floor pump :-). I have a cheap Walmart helmet I use when forced to (one group ride) and it is good to hold your hat on in the winter :-). Inexpensive tire levers, spare tube , patch kit, seat pack to put that in. CO2 and or mini pump...I carry both but started with just CO2. Some newer bikes now have "through axles" instead of quick release so you might need a wrench for removing a wheel. I carry a spare master link for chain too...very inexpensive.
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Old 06-23-16, 08:31 AM
  #31  
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Quite a few shops offer something like a 10% discount on any accessories bought with the bike so make sure you take advantage of that if offered :-).

Bill
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Old 06-23-16, 09:07 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by jgw View Post
In defense of the local bike shop. I went in with the question, "What are my options as a 320 lb guy?" The sales guy showed me stuff to answer that question. I think I was so intimidated that i was not initially clear about what I wanted to do, which is ride for fitness, I'm just unsure what that initially looks like for a couch potato.

I am going back in to the shop this afternoon, their site says the fx 7.2 is now on sale for 449.99 so I was gonna ask about that. I have about $600 tops i can spend right now. That will have to include a helmet and whatever accessories are necessary.
I agree with the suggestion to try a different shop. A good shop should ask pointed questions of beginners and offer reasonable options. Your shop seems to be more about pushing product out the door then about helping you find the right bike. Trek is a nice brand, but not necessarily any better than a dozen other brands it competes against.

As for what riding for fitness means, think of it this way. The good thing about cycling is, it is easy on the joints because it is not a weight bearing activity. (btw, something to consider as far as overall fitness. You need some weight bearing exercise and flexibility as part of an overall fitness plan).

Depending on the intensity, cycling can be as intense as running, or as leisurely as slow walking. On flat ground without wind as a factor, I find that cycling is about as difficult as a brisk walk. Going uphill or into a brisk headwind, cycling is about as difficult as climbing stairs. Going downhill, cycling is more like alpine skiing. More thrills, but not really all that brisk a workout. (of course, if you go downhill, you usually also have to go uphill so it evens out.

For general fitness, something analogous to brisk walking is probably the best thing to shoot for initially. Work up to riding at a slow/moderate pace (11 - 13 mph) for 45 minutes non stop 3 or 4 times a week, and do yoga/stretching and/or weights 2 to 3 times per week. Once you get there, you should be able to do more, maybe much more as far as distance and time on the bike. My local club does rides that average between 2 and 4 hours non stop, or maybe with a short break in the middle, and the people who do this kind of riding regularly are not pro cyclists by any stretch of the imagination.

For weight loss, go on a diet. I have found that though cycling is a terrific way to enjoy the outdoors and get in cardiovascular shape, the weight loss I achieve from cycling is temporary and usually comes back during the long cold winters we have here in the Midwest. Try as I do to ride in the cold weather, when the days get short my mileage falls and for some reason, cycling indoors just isn't the same.
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Old 06-23-16, 10:01 AM
  #33  
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I've found bike shops to be an expensive place to buy accessories. Bikes, Cycling Clothing, Bike Parts & Cycling Gear: Bike Discounts & Deals from Nashbar Jenson USA - Online mountain & road bike parts, clothing and accessories shop | Jenson USA are a couple places I buy from and Jensonusa will price match which is handy to get a large enough order for free shipping. A floor pump is an absolute must as proper inflation is doubly important for a Clyde. Trek's hardcase tires are well named as they're very puncture resistant. They also are expensive and ride harshly. You could wait on tools and stuff until you can ride further than a walk of shame from home.
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Old 06-23-16, 10:24 AM
  #34  
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Cycling on flat ground without wind as a factor CAN be a heart rate 180+ level deal for a 52 year old guy :-)....rider decides whether to drope the hammer or not :-)...
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Old 06-23-16, 12:16 PM
  #35  
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Yes the local shop gives a 10% off all accessories with bike purchase. I figure helmet and whatever I need to deal with a flat tire is bare minimum on accessories. I just spoke with a guy from my church who is into cycling to see what store he recommends (he was excited to hear that I wanted to get into riding), he really likes the local store I went to, knows the owner fairly well and spoke highly of their customer service. He also gave me some tips on what to ask for, particularly that I want a bike that will suit me well that I can grow into a bit.

My goal with cycling is ultimately fun, adventure and a good way to burn off stress, seems like a great way to spend and afternoon or weekend. Exercise to increase energy, endurance and fitness would be a shorter term goal and burning calories for weight loss are just a side benefit.

As far as weight loss I understand all too well that what I eat has a bigger impact on my weight than how much I exercise. Counting calories is not where I am at right now but I have got a few rules that guide me well. One does not get to 320 lbs without some skill at eating garbage. Some of my rules are, If it comes through my car window I should not eat it. No soda. Period. It is my great achilles heel, only water and milk right now. No eating after 8pm. Each week I try some new fruit of vegetable in place of something processed I was eating before. If it comes out of a frier I should not eat it. The fresher and less processed something is the better. If I can cook it and know whats in it and control whats in it, then I can eat it. Seconds are a no no, they are now called leftovers for another day.

So far these rules and a little intelligence helped me through losing 30 lbs. At some point I am going to count calories but right know I am teaching myself how to chose and like healthy options instead of just eating a bag of doritos by myself.
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Old 06-23-16, 03:21 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by jgw View Post
Yes the local shop gives a 10% off all accessories with bike purchase. I figure helmet and whatever I need to deal with a flat tire is bare minimum on accessories. I just spoke with a guy from my church who is into cycling to see what store he recommends (he was excited to hear that I wanted to get into riding), he really likes the local store I went to, knows the owner fairly well and spoke highly of their customer service. He also gave me some tips on what to ask for, particularly that I want a bike that will suit me well that I can grow into a bit.

My goal with cycling is ultimately fun, adventure and a good way to burn off stress, seems like a great way to spend and afternoon or weekend. Exercise to increase energy, endurance and fitness would be a shorter term goal and burning calories for weight loss are just a side benefit.

As far as weight loss I understand all too well that what I eat has a bigger impact on my weight than how much I exercise. Counting calories is not where I am at right now but I have got a few rules that guide me well. One does not get to 320 lbs without some skill at eating garbage. Some of my rules are, If it comes through my car window I should not eat it. No soda. Period. It is my great achilles heel, only water and milk right now. No eating after 8pm. Each week I try some new fruit of vegetable in place of something processed I was eating before. If it comes out of a frier I should not eat it. The fresher and less processed something is the better. If I can cook it and know whats in it and control whats in it, then I can eat it. Seconds are a no no, they are now called leftovers for another day.

So far these rules and a little intelligence helped me through losing 30 lbs. At some point I am going to count calories but right know I am teaching myself how to chose and like healthy options instead of just eating a bag of doritos by myself.
That is GOOD on the food changes....but the body is really dead set on staying a given size in my experience, and it will find a way to get the calories it has decided it "needs"....sadly.

As time has went on it was really eye opening to see that fat in food is NOT a bad thing, ....right now in fact I'm eating 30-50g carbs a day....about 80g Protien, and the rest of my intake is healthy fats.

Bill
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Old 06-25-16, 08:16 PM
  #37  
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Hey all, just wanted to update you on what I got. Went back to the local bike shop, different sales guy who was really helpful. Really walked me through what i should look for in a bike and what to think about with accessories. Didn't try to sell me anything I didn't want, It was a really great experience.

I ended up settling on the trek 7.2. I remember my old bike from high school days (18 years ago) I cannot believe how much faster and light the trek is. It is awesome.

I took it on a quick spin this evening 2 miles in about 15 minutes to get used to shifting and braking. I am glad to say I think I could have rode longer but i didn't want to push it. The seat will take some getting used to but it was not too bad, but I wonder what my body will tell me tomorrow.

I would post a pic but I have no clue how.
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Old 06-25-16, 08:26 PM
  #38  
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Congrats on your purchase. A good sales person can make all the difference.
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Old 06-25-16, 10:37 PM
  #39  
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Congrats! Hope you love riding it and get a lot of good miles in!

On a related note, the puncture-resistant tires are a major plus in my book. I chose to ride to my LBS last Thursday for my first tune-up. Along the way I got a thorn in the rear tire. I couldn't afford to have it changed (don't have my spare kit together yet either), so it was taking a chance to ride on it back home in the 100 degree heat. It did just fine though. Got back and picked out the thorn, which did not puncture. So, really great feature on the 2015/2016 models!
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Old 06-26-16, 08:12 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by jgw View Post
Hey all, just wanted to update you on what I got. Went back to the local bike shop, different sales guy who was really helpful. Really walked me through what i should look for in a bike and what to think about with accessories. Didn't try to sell me anything I didn't want, It was a really great experience.

I ended up settling on the trek 7.2. I remember my old bike from high school days (18 years ago) I cannot believe how much faster and light the trek is. It is awesome.

I took it on a quick spin this evening 2 miles in about 15 minutes to get used to shifting and braking. I am glad to say I think I could have rode longer but i didn't want to push it. The seat will take some getting used to but it was not too bad, but I wonder what my body will tell me tomorrow.

I would post a pic but I have no clue how.
Myself I use Imjur for pictures. I prefer to send the pictures to my computer from my phone then post them, the phone ap the last time I tried to use it was a PITA for me anyway. Scale your pictures to 800 wide by 600 tall. If you get an Imjur account setup and get the picture in there I will show you how you post it here. Pretty easy :-).

If you want to win extra Bike Forums points "stage" the bicycle the following ways
Place it in front of a plain white garage door
Place it with "drive side" towards camera.....that shows the chain rings :-)
Place the pedals so they do not hide any frame tubes on drive side
Place the valve stems both at 6 O'clock
Remove any seat packs or the like unless your post is about seat packs :-)

This one is staged pretty good...........
https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/023...G?v=1432246329
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Old 06-26-16, 02:12 PM
  #41  
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Fellow newbie here as well! I weighed 310 pounds in April, now down to 287. I just started riding again at the end of May on my old trek 3900. I rode a few miles and liked it, but knees were a bit sore and it wasn't the ride I was looking for. So like you, I went looking at a Trek FX7.2. The sales people were helpful and had me test ride that and the V2 as well. I bought the FX 7.2 and haven't looked back since! I love the bike, it's everything I was looking for at this point of my riding. Everything is stock on it and will stay that way. I already have logged 319.11 miles since June 1st and set a goal of 1,000 miles by end of August. I started with a few low mile rides and have since worked upto 20-30 miles per ride.

So, with that said, I highly recommend the FX7.2 but again, I'm just a newbie as well! Good luck to you!
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Old 06-26-16, 08:27 PM
  #42  
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Sigfan, that is awesome! Keep it up. I went on another ride today about three miles. I was definitely feeling it, though more winded than anything. I planned poorly and ended coming up more hill than I should have.

Is there some kind of guide on good technique for shifting gears? usually I let it sit in the 2nd gear and move up and down on the rear gears as needed. At one point I moved up to 3rd and there was significant chatter as I rotated the pedals. Also the chain did not want to go back to 2nd, but eventually did. The chatter also came up again when I moved to the 1st gear. In the middle its smooth as butter. I am not sure if this is user error on my part or something that needs adjusted at the shop.
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Old 06-26-16, 09:03 PM
  #43  
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I have the same shifter on my 7300. When shifting the front chainring you need to kinda over-shift. Keep putting pressure with your thumb until the shift is done. Front shifting is a much slower operation than shifting the rear. With the rear you may only be going between a 17 tooth sprocket to a 19 tooth. The front sprockets have 10 to 16 teeth differences. There's also cross-chaining (google it)to consider. I rarely go above 4th gear while in 1st up front
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Old 06-27-16, 07:16 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by jgw View Post
Sigfan, that is awesome! Keep it up. I went on another ride today about three miles. I was definitely feeling it, though more winded than anything. I planned poorly and ended coming up more hill than I should have.

Is there some kind of guide on good technique for shifting gears? usually I let it sit in the 2nd gear and move up and down on the rear gears as needed. At one point I moved up to 3rd and there was significant chatter as I rotated the pedals. Also the chain did not want to go back to 2nd, but eventually did. The chatter also came up again when I moved to the 1st gear. In the middle its smooth as butter. I am not sure if this is user error on my part or something that needs adjusted at the shop.
Possibly user error, possible also that your front derailleur needs an adjustment. That said, the bike companies often do down a step or two in quality for the front derailleur on the theory that it gets used a lot less. (I don't personally agree with this approach. Others have already noted that when you do use the front derailleur, it is big jumps of 10 to 16 teeth, rather than the 2 or 3 tooth jumps you are asking a back derailleur to do) But that said, there is nothing wrong with even entry level Shimano front derailleurs, but you need to baby them a little. On my current bike, I needed to learn, or re learn how to shift the front derailleur as it was slightly different than it had been on my old bike. Once I did, it became as automatic as shifting the rear derailleurs.

As for how to shift, you will get a sense of that. Your 7.2 is a triple, which trips some up but using a triple is quite simple. First, if you are doing a mostly flat ride (no real hills or at most, slight changes in grade of 3% or less) you might not need to shift the front derailleur at all. I do rides of up to 2 hours sometimes and never shift the front derailleur. On climbs with grades steeper than 3% for longer than 20 or 30 seconds of riding (and in time you will learn where those hills are), I will shift down in the front and up one in the back, then as I go up the hill, shift down in the back to keep my cadence up as I approach the top of the hill. Hopefully, I have enough gears in the back to do this before my legs or heart gives out. Then as I crest the hill, I shift back to the middle ring.

As far as when to use the big ring, it is mostly for picking up speed on rolling hills, or for long, slight downhills, or fast riding with a group.

Even after riding for years, I still use the middle ring more than 90% of the time.
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Old 06-27-16, 10:18 AM
  #45  
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The Trek 7.2 is my standard recommendation for someone who is just getting started. Beach cruisers and pedal forward designs seem to be OK for someone who never wants to bike more than 5 miles once or twice a year. It is clear that you would like to bike more than that. And I wouldn't recommend suspension on a bike in this price point, or for the larger rider. It's more trouble than it's worth (because it's not worth much).

The 7.2 (and the FX line, or similar bikes from other manufactures) is a great place to start. Good luck and have fun!
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