Bike Forums

Bike Forums (https://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   My intro and confusion (https://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/1070903-my-intro-confusion.html)

dc1503 07-03-16 12:18 PM

My intro and confusion
 
Hello !
My backstory, 7 weeks ago I weighed 320# Today I weigh about 280, I'm 6'3 and I'm 44 years young.
I've been dieting and walking daily for exercise, and I would like to get into biking.
Here is where the confusion begins, never really ridden much, since I was young . At 1st I started looking towards beach-cruiser style bikes, I stopped into some bike shops, 1 showed me a Electra townie 7D, the other pointed me in the direction of a fitness oriented, comfort-hybrid, Specialized bike called "Roll". Since that time I've ridden both of these, as well as , a Specialized 'Expedition" which is a comfort bike also. All of these bikes, rode well, and fit me well.. But my question is, after reading many , many post on this forum, does anyone have any recommendations for a bike, anyone been in a similar situation ? Thanks in advance.

10 Wheels 07-03-16 12:23 PM

Go with a used bike for your first one.

Once you get in shape and learn about riding you will know what to look for in the second bike.

You will need one this size. 62 CM

https://wilmington.craigslist.org/bik/5631666500.html

nfmisso 07-03-16 01:11 PM

The most important thing is selecting a bike: Will you ride it ? Nothing else is really critical.

Pick the bike you like the best that is under your budget and ride.

If you know little about bikes - pick the bike shop you like first. Pick a bike shop in the same manner you'd pick any other service professional: check out a few, get opinions, how do they treat you and other customers? What about service and tune up - EVERY bike needs a 30 day / 100 mile tune up and adjustment - it should be included in the purchase price.

Then work with the shop you have chosen to pick a bike that you like. Make sure to get one with a strong rear wheel.

Remember to budget for accessories: lights, mirrors, bottle cage, some way to carry stuff.

Once you know bikes, then CL might become a viable option for you. Of course at that point, you'll have a couple hundred dollars in specialty bike tools and metric wrenches.

Personally, I am one who purchases bikes on CL and ebay, and have the skills and tools to take a bike all the way to a bar frame, and build it back up again as something different. My Trek 720 is an example, it started out as a 21 (3x7) speed flat bar bike with twist grip shifters, and now is 16 (2x8) speed, bike with butterfly bars, friction shifters, double brake levers, 40 spoke wheels, etc. Only the frame and fork remain from the original.

jethro56 07-03-16 01:16 PM

Those of us that really get into biking will have at least two bikes. One will be somewhat like a Trek 7.2 FX and another will have drop handlebars and will be either a roadbike, cyclocross or touring bike. Since I don't like ridding when it's cold, riding is a seasonal activity. I will begin the season riding the FX style bike for the first 200 miles or so. After that I will transition to a Cyclocross bike for the rest of the season. The cyclocross bike is easier/faster/more comfortable once I get my "core muscles" back in shape. I do do core exercises in the winter but it's not the same as actually riding.

dc1503 07-03-16 01:42 PM

Thanks for the response guys, I will continue my search. Unfortunately, my closest lbs is 40 miles away and craigslist is pretty dead in my area for used bikes .

dagray 07-03-16 02:26 PM

First off I am 6'3" and 360 pounds. I ride a carbon road bike (Orbea Orca) and my bike size is 60cm or XL.

Second the wheels will be your weakest point on the bike so if you buy a road bike you may have to upgrade the wheels with ones that have 32 spokes or 36 spokes in the rear (My current bike is 32 spokes front and rear, but my old bike had 28 spokes on the front and I upgraded to 32 on the rear).

third, go make friends with the bike shop that is 40 miles away and let them know it is okay to refer items to you that they would refer to a fat person so they don't try to sell you something that won't last (My shop kept telling me the 28 spoke rear wheel would work, and I was taking it in all the time to be re-trued... when they got it through their head that I know I am fat and to get me something that wasn't costing me time and money to get repaired we would get along better...My shop is 30 miles away).

fourth: figure out what type of bike you want, and remember bikes with drop bars (road bike style) give you more options for your hand placement.

fifth: buy the bike you will ride and then get it properly fitted to you (which is more than raising the saddle).

sixth: enjoy.

Willbird 07-03-16 03:46 PM

40 miles away is not too bad for distance :-). I have a small lbs about 8 miles away but they do not carry much besides bikes. Most bigger shops are 1-2 hours away. We just make a day trip out of it :-).

rnothog 07-03-16 10:23 PM

I'm starting with a hybrid. Wanted smooth shifting, disc brakes, and that's what I got. Take a look at Giant, Trek, Specialized. You'll find something you like.

MRT2 07-04-16 12:44 AM


Originally Posted by jethro56 (Post 18886567)
Those of us that really get into biking will have at least two bikes. One will be somewhat like a Trek 7.2 FX and another will have drop handlebars and will be either a roadbike, cyclocross or touring bike. Since I don't like ridding when it's cold, riding is a seasonal activity. I will begin the season riding the FX style bike for the first 200 miles or so. After that I will transition to a Cyclocross bike for the rest of the season. The cyclocross bike is easier/faster/more comfortable once I get my "core muscles" back in shape. I do do core exercises in the winter but it's not the same as actually riding.

True, I own one light touring bike, a Salsa Casseroll, and two flat bar bikes, a Trek 930 and a Bianchi Advantage. That said, the flat bar bikes are strictly backup and loaner bikes. Put another way, my Salsa gets ridden over 1,200 miles a riding season, whereas my Trek and Bianchi get, maybe 50 to 100 miles each.

dc1503 07-04-16 07:20 AM


Originally Posted by rnothog (Post 18887497)
I'm starting with a hybrid. Wanted smooth shifting, disc brakes, and that's what I got. Take a look at Giant, Trek, Specialized. You'll find something you like.

Thanks, this is the way I'm looking to go. I'm looking used but they are pretty limited in my area .

ColaJacket 07-04-16 04:15 PM


Originally Posted by dc1503 (Post 18887951)
Thanks, this is the way I'm looking to go. I'm looking used but they are pretty limited in my area .

It would help if you gave your location, as others might be able to help you.

GH

dc1503 07-04-16 08:42 PM


Originally Posted by ColaJacket (Post 18888872)
It would help if you gave your location, as others might be able to help you.

GH

Actually not too far from you. Duplin county, NC

ColaJacket 07-05-16 02:20 PM


Originally Posted by dc1503 (Post 18889326)
Actually not too far from you. Duplin county, NC

Spend a day in the Raleigh area looking at bikes.

I got my Fuji Sportif at the Performance Bikes in Cary. They are good for beginners as the prices are a little lower (10%-20%) than a lot of other bike stores. Plus you get free lifetime adjustments when you buy a bike there. Of course, being 1.5 hours from Raleigh, you'll probably want to learn to do your own wrenching for minor things.

Other good stores in the Raleigh area (and the major brand(s) they carry):

All-Star Bikes: Specialized and Giant
Bicycle Chain: Cannondale
Cycling Spoken Here: Trek
Oak City Cycles: Not sure, but here good things about them.

At 280#, you should be able to ride any type of bicycle that will fit you. Many others have started with road bikes at your weight. I was at 5'5" and 255#, and I went for a road bike. I got one with 28/32 spokes and 700x28 tires, and I haven't had any issues with the wheels/tires.

Now, if you want to start with a hybrid or a cruiser/comfort bike, and that will get you riding, then get one of those. The thing is to get a bike you WANT to ride, and that will fit you, and that you feel comfortable riding. If you feel comfortable on a road bike, and that excites you, then get one of those. Now cyclocross and gravel bikes look a lot like road bikes, but normally can fit slightly wider tires. That may be a good compromise, as the wider tires will allow you to use less pressure, which will help the ride comfort. But they'll still have the more sporty feel of a road bike.

Go to several LBS's, road test different styles (e.g. hybrid, gravel, endurance road, racing road, etc.) of bikes in your size. Then see which fit your budget, and get the one that makes you want to ride it.

I'd also check out the Triangle Craigslist, as it is more active than those closer to you. I'm not sure what the market is in Fayetteville or Wilmington.

GH


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:04 AM.


Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.