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Hybrid Bike Inner Tube Suggestions For Overweight

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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Hybrid Bike Inner Tube Suggestions For Overweight

Old 07-30-16, 11:44 PM
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jays4lyfe
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Hybrid Bike Inner Tube Suggestions For Overweight

Hi there all;
Im new to this forum and new to cycling. I just purchased a Schwinn 28" OCR Hybrid Bike. Im 5'11 and weigh 280lbs and have to loose weight for my job so I purchased this new bike, only drawback is that when I ride the bike the rear tire goes down like its on a flat but its not.

The tires are 700cc. My question is; is there a tire and inner tube that I can purchase where the tire won't go down and I can get a smoother ride? If so can you all please provide the names and links to the product if at all possible?

Thank you in advance guys!
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Old 07-31-16, 12:48 AM
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StephenH
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On our tandem, we run 32x700 Gatorskins at 100 psi with no problems. That's me at about 193 lbs and stoker at maybe 140 lbs.
It sounds like you just don't have enough air in the tires. Check carefully on the sidewall, it should show maximum pressure somewhere, use that if you're on the heavy side.
There is some variation in the maximum pressures on different brands and models of tires.
If you don't have enough air pressure in a tire, you'll get "pinch flats" from going over a big bump- where the tube gets pinched with two holes in it. If you're not having that problem, and using the maximum recommended pressure, don't worry too much about how the tires look- they're supposed to deflect some when loaded.
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Old 07-31-16, 10:51 AM
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Old 07-31-16, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by jays4lyfe View Post
Hi there all;
Im new to this forum and new to cycling. I just purchased a Schwinn 28" OCR Hybrid Bike. Im 5'11 and weigh 280lbs and have to loose weight for my job so I purchased this new bike, only drawback is that when I ride the bike the rear tire goes down like its on a flat but its not.

The tires are 700cc. My question is; is there a tire and inner tube that I can purchase where the tire won't go down and I can get a smoother ride? If so can you all please provide the names and links to the product if at all possible?

Thank you in advance guys!
What pressure are you running? I'm heavier than you and I don't see the phenomenon your experience. Pinch flats are mostly a question of not enough inflation; so keep the pressure up to the tire's maximum.

As for the actual tire, it depends how big you bike can take. The bigger the tire, the more air, and the smoother the ride. I have two bikes and both are on 32mm Specialized Roubaix, inflated at 95 psi.
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Old 07-31-16, 03:30 PM
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Originally Posted by PatrickR400 View Post
What pressure are you running? I'm heavier than you and I don't see the phenomenon your experience. Pinch flats are mostly a question of not enough inflation; so keep the pressure up to the tire's maximum.

As for the actual tire, it depends how big you bike can take. The bigger the tire, the more air, and the smoother the ride. I have two bikes and both are on 32mm Specialized Roubaix, inflated at 95 psi.
Thank you for your response, The tire pressure is currently the same as it was when I purchased the bike and I have yet to experience any pinched flats. The problem is that the tire goes low when I put my weight on the bike causing me to pedal harder and the ride is not so smooth.

The info on the side wall is posted below;
INNOVA 40-622\700x38c Inflate to 50-75 PSI

From the info you posted on your tire I assume I need a tire and tube that can hold a max of 95 PSI. Im seeking information because I know nothing about this subject and when I go to the bike shop I would like to be able to specify to them what it is that I want them to do for me. Below is a link to the bike I have;

https://m.target.com/p/schwinn-mens-o...B&gclsrc=aw.ds
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Old 07-31-16, 03:41 PM
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Bicycle tires aren't like a car tire that may only need air a couple times a year. I have a floor pump with a gauge similar to this https://www.performancebike.com/bike...514&cadevice=c and I have to add air twice a week. With a 38 mm tire and a 300# rider, 70 psi on the rear and 55 psi on the front should be adequate.
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Old 07-31-16, 04:07 PM
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Bicycle tires are inflated to different pressures, depending on the weight of the rider and the width of the tire. So, for your weight, you would inflate different width tires to different pressures. The width is the XXc number (XX being the width in mm).

So, your tires are 38 mm wide. The narrower the tire, the more pressure you require. So, the 32c tires may have a max of 95 psi, but the 38c tires will support you at 75 psi. Even as low as 65 psi.

You need to get a pump with a gauge, or use a pump and a separate gauge to ensure that you got the pressure to 65-75 psi. Your index and thumb pressure gauge will get 'calibrated' after you go through the exercise a few times.

Bicycle tires do not keep their pressure. In the summer, I have to pump them up every couple of days. In the winter, I can get away with pumping them up every couple of weeks.

When I was 265-270 I used to pump my 35c to 80 psi and you could hardly see any flattening of the tire.
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Old 07-31-16, 08:30 PM
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Originally Posted by GerryinHouston View Post
Bicycle tires are inflated to different pressures, depending on the weight of the rider and the width of the tire. So, for your weight, you would inflate different width tires to different pressures. The width is the XXc number (XX being the width in mm).

So, your tires are 38 mm wide. The narrower the tire, the more pressure you require. So, the 32c tires may have a max of 95 psi, but the 38c tires will support you at 75 psi. Even as low as 65 psi.

You need to get a pump with a gauge, or use a pump and a separate gauge to ensure that you got the pressure to 65-75 psi. Your index and thumb pressure gauge will get 'calibrated' after you go through the exercise a few times.

Bicycle tires do not keep their pressure. In the summer, I have to pump them up every couple of days. In the winter, I can get away with pumping them up every couple of weeks.

When I was 265-270 I used to pump my 35c to 80 psi and you could hardly see any flattening of the tire.

GerryinHoustin,

Thank you so much Im going the purchase a good pump with a gauge and make certain I inflate the tire to 75 PSI.
I'm learning from this forum and so happy to be here.
Thanks again!
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Old 08-01-16, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by jays4lyfe View Post
...

The info on the side wall is posted below;
INNOVA 40-622\700x38c Inflate to 50-75 PSI

...
The original tires on my hybrid were Schwalbe 700x38c, so very similar. I switched to Roubaix 32c tires because I ride on road and the tires have lower rolling resistance, and noise than blocky, off-road tires.

Us guys are pretty much stuck at the higher pressure, and has others have mentioned, bike tires lose air pressure fairly fast. I pump up to the right pressure before every ride. I don't know what type of valve you have on your inner tube, but assuming they are Presta (Google it), they need to be unscrewed before you pump them up, you can Google that too if needed.
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Old 08-07-16, 06:55 PM
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Originally Posted by PatrickR400 View Post
What pressure are you running? I'm heavier than you and I don't see the phenomenon your experience. Pinch flats are mostly a question of not enough inflation; so keep the pressure up to the tire's maximum.

As for the actual tire, it depends how big you bike can take. The bigger the tire, the more air, and the smoother the ride. I have two bikes and both are on 32mm Specialized Roubaix, inflated at 95 psi.
So heres the update. I went and purchased a good quality tire pump with a psi guage and found that I only had 40 psi, so I pumped the tire to 70 psi and to my suprise I now have a very smooth ride. For my first ride I rode 4.5 mi.

Thanks guys for all your help!
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Old 08-08-16, 04:09 AM
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Originally Posted by jays4lyfe View Post
So heres the update. I went and purchased a good quality tire pump with a psi guage and found that I only had 40 psi, so I pumped the tire to 70 psi and to my suprise I now have a very smooth ride. For my first ride I rode 4.5 mi.

Thanks guys for all your help!
Super!
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