Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
Reload this Page >

Mr. Tuffy versus Mr. Goat Head

Notices
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

Mr. Tuffy versus Mr. Goat Head

Old 09-19-16, 06:47 AM
  #1  
boozergut
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
boozergut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 377

Bikes: Kona Dew, Gary Fisher Paragon, Salsa Campeon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 36 Posts
Mr. Tuffy versus Mr. Goat Head

Hello:


I repaired a front tire flat this weekend from a goat head that went through the center of my 700C tire and through the Mr. Tuffy Tire Liner. I only pull off the MUP to take breaks at a picnic table etc. so this was a bit of bad luck.


What is the latest tire and or liner technology for this issue?


Thanks in Advance!


Boozer.....
boozergut is offline  
Old 09-19-16, 07:01 AM
  #2  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,482

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5001 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,524 Posts
Originally Posted by boozergut View Post
Hello:


I repaired a front tire flat this weekend from a goat head that went through the center of my 700C tire and through the Mr. Tuffy Tire Liner. I only pull off the MUP to take breaks at a picnic table etc. so this was a bit of bad luck.


What is the latest tire and or liner technology for this issue?


Thanks in Advance!


Boozer.....
You're looking at it. Many tires come with the liner integrated into the tire now but they really are just a fancier version of the Tuffy liner.

You could try sealants. They tend to be messier and cause valve sticking issues. Most everyone that I work with at my local co-op hates them with a passion because we have all been "slimed". I've tired sealants and not found them to be that effective. That may be how I was using it, however. I was told by a Slime sommelier that you should pull out the goat head and allow some air to push the Slime into the hole so that it seals. If the spine in still in the tube, it just reopens the hole all the time and never seals properly. I haven't tried it yet.

Someone will eventually come along touting the wonders of tubeless but that just the same thing as "Slime" and no necessarily fool proof. I've been on rides where the tubeless guys got flats due to goat heads and I didn't with Tuffy liners. I made the mistake of angering the Evil Goathead by boasting about it and ended up with 63 punctures the next year I did the same ride.

Don't anger the Evil Goathead
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 09-19-16, 03:10 PM
  #3  
Inpd
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 1,825
Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 401 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by boozergut View Post
Hello:


I repaired a front tire flat this weekend from a goat head that went through the center of my 700C tire and through the Mr. Tuffy Tire Liner. I only pull off the MUP to take breaks at a picnic table etc. so this was a bit of bad luck.


What is the latest tire and or liner technology for this issue?


Thanks in Advance!


Boozer.....
Heavier tires with built in flat protection are good at stopping goat head thorns in the very center part of the tire thread. Anywhere off to the side, good luck.
Inpd is offline  
Old 09-19-16, 04:29 PM
  #4  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4904 Post(s)
Liked 1,727 Times in 956 Posts
Originally Posted by boozergut View Post
What is the latest tire and or liner technology for this issue?
After a bout of front-tire flats on the wife's bike, including 2 on one ride, I went looking for Mr. Tuffy, but the local store only had something called Rhinodillos and it turns out that was a good thing. Currently passing 5,000 miles without a puncture, spread over two sets of tires. And her Clement Stradas were debris magnets.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Someone will eventually come along touting the wonders of tubeless but that just the same thing as "Slime" and no necessarily fool proof. I've been on rides where the tubeless guys got flats due to goat heads and I didn't with Tuffy liners.
User error, 100%. If properly mounted and maintained, it is virtually impossible to get a non-sealing puncture from a goathead (still weird for me to type, we've always called them bullthorns.) I have in excess of 10,000 miles on road tubeless, and have experienced zero punctures. I did once have a Schwalbe One keep going flat from an abrasion on the sidewall... because I forgot to check the sealant in the tire and it was bone-dry. So... user error.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 09-19-16, 05:00 PM
  #5  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,482

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5001 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,524 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
User error, 100%. If properly mounted and maintained, it is virtually impossible to get a non-sealing puncture from a goathead (still weird for me to type, we've always called them bullthorns.) I have in excess of 10,000 miles on road tubeless, and have experienced zero punctures. I did once have a Schwalbe One keep going flat from an abrasion on the sidewall... because I forgot to check the sealant in the tire and it was bone-dry. So... user error.
A goat head puncture has nothing to do with how the tire is mounted. It might has something to do with the way that the tire was maintained but that's a different issue. Personally, I can't see why a sealant inside a tire should need to be "maintained" at all. It's a sealed, air tight system. Slime tubes don't need to be "maintained" nor "refreshed" from time to time.

Chemically, I can see why the sealant for tubeless has to be "maintained" because they use the wrong solvent on it. If they used a different material that didn't dissolve into the tire, the sealant would never dry out.

Finally there is a difference between road and mountain bike flat frequency due to goat heads (we used to call them tackburrs). I can go for thousands of miles without a flat on road bikes even in goat head infested Colorado because I don't take the bike off roads. Even if I have to roll the bike off a road to fix something, I usually carry it to avoid goat heads because they tend to grow along the sides of roads here.

With a mountain bike, you just can't avoid them. But Tuffys work as well as sealants in my experience for off-road application.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 09-19-16, 05:11 PM
  #6  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4904 Post(s)
Liked 1,727 Times in 956 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
A goat head puncture has nothing to do with how the tire is mounted. It might has something to do with the way that the tire was maintained but that's a different issue. Personally, I can't see why a sealant inside a tire should need to be "maintained" at all. It's a sealed, air tight system. Slime tubes don't need to be "maintained" nor "refreshed" from time to time.

Chemically, I can see why the sealant for tubeless has to be "maintained" because they use the wrong solvent on it. If they used a different material that didn't dissolve into the tire, the sealant would never dry out.
If the tire isn't properly mounted, it's going to leakdown. As it leaks down, it takes a little bit of the sealant with it, because the sealant is constantly trying to seal the leak. Sealant has to be maintained because we don't ride our bicycles in the vacuum of space-- a tire is most certainly not an air-tight system. If it were, we could fill a tire once and then never need to bother with it again. I mean, it would be great if that weren't the case, wouldn't it? Balloons would be infinite. Let's call a typical tubeless tire "deflation resistant."

Slime tubes absolutely need to be refreshed. The stuff does dry out after awhile, you know. Same with latex. It's a liquid, inside a tire, to help with puncture resistance. It's not magic juice. Air gets out of a tire and sealant dries out because a tire is only making it's best effort at being sealed. Pressure moves from high to low, always, and so long as we all put more than 14.7psi in a tire, that air is going to find a way out.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 09-19-16, 08:41 PM
  #7  
dagray
Senior Member
 
dagray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Boardman, Oregon, USA
Posts: 1,748

Bikes: Orbea Orca,Raleigh Talus 29er, Centurion Le Mans 12 speed

Mentioned: 11 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 164 Post(s)
Liked 84 Times in 42 Posts
I live in goat head central and use Maxxis Padrone tubeless in 700x25. Yes I get goat head punctures, yes the sealant fills them.
dagray is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 06:51 AM
  #8  
Jarrett2
Senior Member
 
Jarrett2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: DFW
Posts: 4,126

Bikes: Steel 1x's

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 632 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Anyone have a picture of a goathead?

(I'm already regretting this...)
Jarrett2 is offline  
Likes For Jarrett2:
Old 09-20-16, 07:00 AM
  #9  
bwilli88 
Not lost wanderer.
 
bwilli88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Kampong Cham, Cambodia but I have quite a few in Lancaster, PA
Posts: 3,000

Bikes: Bikes in USA; 73 Raleigh SuperCourse dingle speed, 72 Raleigh GranSport SS, 72 Geoffry Butler, 81 Centurion Pro-Tour, 82 Raleigh RRA.

Mentioned: 68 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 769 Post(s)
Liked 654 Times in 369 Posts
Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
Anyone have a picture of a goathead?

(I'm already regretting this...)













__________________
Cambodia bikes, 83 Gazelle Opafiets, A Klunker, Maxwell All-road, Bridgestone SRAM 2 speed, 2012 Fuji Stratos.
bwilli88 is offline  
Likes For bwilli88:
Old 09-20-16, 07:22 AM
  #10  
Jarrett2
Senior Member
 
Jarrett2's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: DFW
Posts: 4,126

Bikes: Steel 1x's

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 632 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Dang those look scary. Both of them
Jarrett2 is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 08:22 AM
  #11  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,482

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5001 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,524 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
If the tire isn't properly mounted, it's going to leakdown. As it leaks down, it takes a little bit of the sealant with it, because the sealant is constantly trying to seal the leak. Sealant has to be maintained because we don't ride our bicycles in the vacuum of space-- a tire is most certainly not an air-tight system. If it were, we could fill a tire once and then never need to bother with it again. I mean, it would be great if that weren't the case, wouldn't it? Balloons would be infinite. Let's call a typical tubeless tire "deflation resistant."
So are you saying that every tubeless tire is mounted improperly? Tubeless tire sealant has to be replaced in all tubeless tires about every 6 months. That's a whole lot of leakage.

And, yes, air diffuses out of tubes and tires. There's a reasonable explanation for why that happens. But water and liquids don't...or shouldn't. You could fill a tube with water and come back years later and not see any appreciable loss of the water. You could fill a tube partly with air and partly with water and the water is still going to be there years later. Water doesn't diffuse out of the tube or tire because of it's surface tension.

The problem with the sealant currently used in tires is that the solvent used dissolves in the tire. That's where the sealant goes after only a short time...I consider 6 months to be a short time when it comes to liquids escaping from rubber containers. The other problem with the sealant is that the glycol they use doesn't evaporate since glycols don't have a very high vapor pressure. The solvent is actually just dissolving into the rubber. At some point, you would expect that the rubber would become saturated with the solvent and you would have to stop adding more but I have no idea how much glycol can dissolve in the rubber. It seems like a lot considering that a 600g tire can suck up 56g (2 oz) of low volatility solvent in short order.

I've observed this in tires that used to "blister" with tubeless tire conversions. I don't see blistering much anymore but the mechanism for the glycol to leave the tire is still the same one since the sealant has to be refreshed frequently.

Something else to consider on the weight wienie side, the glycol has a low volatility so the 2 oz of sealant goes into the tire and stays there. The next two ounces goes into the tire and stays there. And the next. And the next. Some gets ablated off but probably not a significant amount. The tire weight is increasing with each application of sealant by 56g. That could quickly become a significant weight gain on a part of the bike where gaining weight has more of an impact than anywhere else.

Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
Slime tubes absolutely need to be refreshed. The stuff does dry out after awhile, you know. Same with latex. It's a liquid, inside a tire, to help with puncture resistance. It's not magic juice. Air gets out of a tire and sealant dries out because a tire is only making it's best effort at being sealed. Pressure moves from high to low, always, and so long as we all put more than 14.7psi in a tire, that air is going to find a way out.
Slime doesn't dry out in my experience nor have I ever heard of someone needing to "refresh" it. I've been Slimed by plenty of old Slime tubes at my local co-op. We've had lots of old bikes with plenty of Slime left over even after the air has gone out of the tires.

And, again, gases and liquids operate under very different mechanisms when in a pressurized tire. Yes, gases diffuses out quickly and even at different rates. Carbon dioxide diffuses rapidly because it dissolves in the rubber like the glycol in tubeless sealants. Nitrogen takes longer. Oxygen in kind of in the middle. But liquids don't usually diffuse out of rubber containers.

Finally, the only reason that tubeless is slightly puncture resistant is for the same reason that Slime is slightly puncture resistant. It's the sealant. Without that sealant, tubeless isn't any more puncture resistant than a normal tire. Personally, I find the whole complicated procedure of mounting the tires and the need for constant maintenance to not be worth the marginal puncture resistance. I have some experience with mounting the tires at my local co-op. It took 2 hours and 4 people to get the old tire off and the new tire on and sealed.

I'll pass.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 08:27 AM
  #12  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,482

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5001 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,524 Posts
Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
Dang those look scary. Both of them
Assuming the DFW in your sig line is Dallas/Ft. Worth, I'm amazed that you've never seen them. I'm sure that you can get all you like just a bit to the north (Oklahoma City) and northeast (Amarillo) of you. Right now is prime goat head harvest season.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 08:44 AM
  #13  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4904 Post(s)
Liked 1,727 Times in 956 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Personally, I find the whole complicated procedure of mounting the tires and the need for constant maintenance to not be worth the marginal puncture resistance. I have some experience with mounting the tires at my local co-op. It took 2 hours and 4 people to get the old tire off and the new tire on and sealed.

I'll pass.
That's the beauty of it. You are absolutely entitled to be wrong... which you are. I mean, I recognize that the apocalyptic amount of flats/punctures you've gotten is some sort of point of personal pride, but I'll stick to 10,000+ miles without a puncture. I don't need anything to mount my Maxxis tubeless other than a couple of minutes and my thumbs. If your experience with tubeless is limited to mounting a few tires at the local co-op, maybe you should stick to things you actually know about?
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 09:36 AM
  #14  
PhotoJoe 
Just Plain Slow
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Santa Clarita, CA
Posts: 6,038

Bikes: Lynskey R230

Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 297 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 5 Times in 5 Posts
What was this thread about again?
PhotoJoe is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 10:06 AM
  #15  
LGHT
Senior Member
 
LGHT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Irvine
Posts: 1,416

Bikes: Specialized Tarmac SL3, Nishiki Pro Hybrid SL

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I ride with puncture resistant tubes and don't worry about tires, flats, goats, lion's, tigers. Some say it adds resistance, but I'm not racing and will never really be that fast so it's not a huge issue for me. However flats are and have been a constant problem so I choose to avoid them altogether with these heavy duty tubes. I have yet to get a flat in over 2 years now and I never even bother packing spare tubes, c02, etc etc...



LGHT is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 10:22 AM
  #16  
boozergut
Full Member
Thread Starter
 
boozergut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 377

Bikes: Kona Dew, Gary Fisher Paragon, Salsa Campeon

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 82 Post(s)
Liked 61 Times in 36 Posts
Originally Posted by LGHT View Post
I ride with puncture resistant tubes and don't worry about tires, flats, goats, lion's, tigers. Some say it adds resistance, but I'm not racing and will never really be that fast so it's not a huge issue for me. However flats are and have been a constant problem so I choose to avoid them altogether with these heavy duty tubes. I have yet to get a flat in over 2 years now and I never even bother packing spare tubes, c02, etc etc...



Your pic is that of a sandbur which is a little les deadly than a goat head.
boozergut is offline  
Old 09-20-16, 11:09 AM
  #17  
Milton Keynes
Senior Member
 
Milton Keynes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 3,807

Bikes: Trek 1100 road bike, Roadmaster gravel/commuter/beater mountain bike

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2173 Post(s)
Liked 1,542 Times in 856 Posts
Originally Posted by boozergut View Post
Your pic is that of a sandbur which is a little les deadly than a goat head.
Sand burs bring back bad childhood memories of walking around barefoot and then getting one stuck in the bottom of my foot. We had one electric pole on the corner which had sand burs growing next to the base. We quickly learned to avoid that area if barefoot, since it seemed like the burs liked to find their way away from the pole.
Milton Keynes is offline  
Old 09-21-16, 08:38 AM
  #18  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,482

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5001 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,524 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
That's the beauty of it. You are absolutely entitled to be wrong... which you are. I mean, I recognize that the apocalyptic amount of flats/punctures you've gotten is some sort of point of personal pride, but I'll stick to 10,000+ miles without a puncture. I don't need anything to mount my Maxxis tubeless other than a couple of minutes and my thumbs.
I fail to see the "beauty" of a 2 hour process that takes 8 man hours to achieve. A large part of the time was just figuring out how to get the bead out of the rim. It had a round bead on the tire that snapped into a round channel in the rim which made removal extremely difficult. Installation wasn't any easier and it was very messy. Even the paid mechanics at my local co-op dread tubeless installations given the mess and frustrating installation procedure.

As an aside, the rim that took so much time and man hours was brought in with another bike that used narrower road tires which had burped off the rim because they were trying to run them at 30 psi. They were easier to put back on the rim but nearly impossible to inflate because the tire had too large a gap. It was even messier than the other job because we had sealant leaking out all over the place.

As I pointed out, I can go just about as many road miles as you can with regular tubes and either liners or tires with integral liners. If I wanted to carry around the weight of sealant, I could install Slime and get just as good a result with less mess and fuss.

Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
If your experience with tubeless is limited to mounting a few tires at the local co-op, maybe you should stick to things you actually know about?
Ah, the subtle ol' "Don't pay any attention to this guy because he knows nothing" ad hominem. Classy.

My experience with tubeless is limited to mounting a few tires at my local co-op because I don't see the need for tubeless when I have other strategies that work just as well. Tubeless is a rather expensive proposition to just "try" on a whim. I have no problem adopting new technologies if they make my life easier but tubeless is just not one of those technologies. I don't have problems with pinch flats because I ride my tires with proper pressure to avoid them. I don't like extra weight and mess of sealant whether it's Slime or tubeless sealant nor do I relish the idea of tearing apart a difficult to install tire every 6 months just to replace something that shouldn't need replacing.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 09-21-16, 08:39 AM
  #19  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 25,482

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, a black and orange one, and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 138 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5001 Post(s)
Liked 2,582 Times in 1,524 Posts
Originally Posted by boozergut View Post
Your pic is that of a sandbur which is a little les deadly than a goat head.
Actually a lot less deadly to tires but not to bare feet or fingers. Damn those things hurt and the spines are smaller.
__________________
Stuart Black
Gold Fever Three days of dirt in Colorado
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 09-21-16, 09:00 AM
  #20  
DrIsotope
Non omnino gravis
 
DrIsotope's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: SoCal, USA!
Posts: 8,553

Bikes: Nekobasu, Pandicorn, Lakitu

Mentioned: 119 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4904 Post(s)
Liked 1,727 Times in 956 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I fail to see the "beauty" of a 2 hour process that takes 8 man hours to achieve. A large part of the time was just figuring out how to get the bead out of the rim.
If it took the group of you 8 man hours to unmount a tire, I understand why you all work for free.

As I pointed out, I can go just about as many road miles as you can with regular tubes and either liners or tires with integral liners. If I wanted to carry around the weight of sealant, I could install Slime and get just as good a result with less mess and fuss.
Further evidence you don't know what you're talking about. Slime ≠ Latex sealant. And dear lord, heaven forbid you burden yourself by carrying a 2oz bottle of latex with you. I'm sure you cancel that weight out with spare tubes, CO2, levers, etc, etc., and I'm sure that stuff totally weighs less (not that makes any difference whatsoever.) Oh, and around 6,000 miles on road tubeless this year for me. Zero punctures.

Oh, the subtle ol' "Don't pay any attention to this guy because he knows nothing" ad hominem. Classy.
You have never ridden on tubeless tires, yet you talk them down at every opportunity. You and your buddies had a hard time mounting them one time, "they must suck." If anyone wants to get into the business of logical fallacy, go grab a mirror, guy. You're dismissing them as an option out of hand, with no practical experience. So yes, absolutely, with regard to the matter in question, your opinion is less valid than my empirical evidence.

... nor do I relish the idea of tearing apart a difficult to install tire every 6 months just to replace something that shouldn't need replacing.
Replace sealant every 6 months? I genuinely wouldn't know. I've yet to have a tire last past 3 months. If I was putting on 60 miles a week like many of the BF elite, I might have a different view. But I ride quite a bit, and tubeless has positives that far, far outweigh the negatives.
__________________
DrIsotope is offline  
Old 09-21-16, 09:44 AM
  #21  
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Posts: 21,745

Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1121 Post(s)
Liked 684 Times in 464 Posts
MOD NOTE: Everyone, Please stay on topic, and not make it personal. Thanks
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike.

FYI: https://www.bikeforums.net/forum-sugg...ad-please.html
Homebrew01 is offline  
Old 12-07-21, 02:03 PM
  #22  
Jack Kessler
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Flat hazards on the GDMBR

Not to be narcissistic, but I do not care about flat problems in New England, Florida, or the DFW area. I intend to do the GDMBR, the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route, this summer. What can those of you who have done the GDMBR recommend about flat hazards there? Someone has already mentioned Colorado being the goathead capital of universe. But Colorado is vast and most of the bikes in it are around Denver and Boulder. What tires should I consider for the GDMBR? I expect 29ers between 2" and 2.5".
Jack Kessler is offline  
Old 12-08-21, 10:20 AM
  #23  
Altair 4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Along the Rivers of Pittsburgh
Posts: 1,220

Bikes: 2011 Novara Forza Hybrid, 2005 Trek 820, 1989 Cannondale SR500 Black Lightning, 1975 Mundo Cycles Caloi Racer

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 233 Post(s)
Liked 229 Times in 125 Posts
Originally Posted by DrIsotope View Post
After a bout of front-tire flats on the wife's bike, including 2 on one ride....
In 11 years of riding, I've had two flats, both on rear tires, so they were messier changes (after the second one, I put a pair of vinyl painting gloves in my saddle bag). I bought Mr. Tuffy liners and that seems to have helped. It's been years since I had a flat ('Course, I've just doomed myself).
Altair 4 is offline  
Likes For Altair 4:
Old 12-08-21, 02:13 PM
  #24  
giffenf
Full Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Southern California
Posts: 268

Bikes: Specialized Aethos Pro, Specialized TriCross Sport, Specialized Tarmac Expert, Trek Fuel EX 9.8, Medici Pro Strada

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Liked 1,065 Times in 247 Posts
I went looking for Mr Tuffys but only found Rhinodillos, so I put them inside the Gatorskins on my commuter bike. Only one flat so far and that was because a seam on the rim side of the tube gave out. My commute goes through East and Central L.A., which has pavement so bad I call it the Cobblestones Stage of my ride. I got some more Rhinodillos and some Michelin Protek Max tubes for my MTB and haven’t had a flat since. When I wear out the rims on my commuter bike, maybe I’ll buy a tubeless wheelset, but I suspect I will retire by then and not need to commute anymore. And when I upgrade to a better MTB, I’ll go tubeless there, too. My new road bike is ready for tubeless, but came with tubes. I’ll wait until I wear out the tires before upgrading that one. No flats yet on it, either, but it’s only been 2 months.
giffenf is offline  
Old 12-08-21, 09:53 PM
  #25  
canopus 
Senior Member
 
canopus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Kingwood, TX
Posts: 1,587

Bikes: Road, Touring, BMX, Cruisers...

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 133 Post(s)
Liked 168 Times in 107 Posts
Originally Posted by Jack Kessler View Post
Not to be narcissistic, but I do not care about flat problems in New England, Florida, or the DFW area. I intend to do the GDMBR, the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route, this summer. What can those of you who have done the GDMBR recommend about flat hazards there? Someone has already mentioned Colorado being the goathead capital of universe. But Colorado is vast and most of the bikes in it are around Denver and Boulder. What tires should I consider for the GDMBR? I expect 29ers between 2" and 2.5".
Please start a new post as you have pulled up a 5 year old thread to start a new conversation...
__________________
1984 Cannondale ST
1985 Cannondale SR300
1980 Gary Littlejohn Cruiser
1984 Trek 760
1981 Trek 710
Pics

Last edited by canopus; 12-09-21 at 07:58 AM.
canopus is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
pennpaul
Bicycle Mechanics
6
06-18-18 01:04 AM
AdvXtrm
Touring
66
02-04-17 01:00 PM
Bmach
General Cycling Discussion
21
12-20-16 05:11 AM
gsa103
Road Cycling
16
04-13-15 08:43 AM
rydabent
Bicycle Mechanics
3
09-23-10 03:14 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.